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2 minutes ago, rayban said:

Awhile back, I bought his "autobiography".

It was finished by another man.

I think a good TV movie could be made about Clifton Webb and his mother. He was unique among stars of the 40s and 50s

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On 5/29/2018 at 11:53 AM, TopBilled said:

Screen Shot 2018-05-29 at 8.36.00 AM.jpg

I've told you a hundred times, my book about Hummingbird Hill is not ready to be published yet. But when it comes out, you will each get a personally autographed copy. And when you turn to the index in the back, you will see that every one in the community has a score on the Kinsey scale. I try to be as accurate as possible in my research.

Not to get off topic here, the whole point being funny captions, but... Sitting Pretty is a movie that probably deserves a thread all its own in the "LGBT" arena. In fact, that might be a good idea. Feel free to move the discussion, because there is sssssoooooo much to analyze here.

For one thing, we have the timing of its release, being filmed in 1947 and shown in theaters in March of '48, only a month and a half after the Alfred Kinsey team's Sexual Behavior Of The Human Male rocked America like no other science book. Before this time, homosexuality was pretty much ignored. Now it was considered more... *gasp*... normal by some "expert" and his team. I suspect... OK, I know based on all that I have read and heard... that a major panic gripped this country thanks to both Kinsey books in '48 and '53 (female version suggesting lesbianism isn't a myth), which is why a major witch hunt investigated the workforce during the next decade and those in the closet had to keep their doors shut more tightly than in previous decades. That is, until the pressure got too great in the later sixties and it all exploded via Stonewall and Boys In The Band.

Yet there is so much good in this film that reflects a more broad minded thinking that was ahead of its time.

On the positive side, Maureen O'Hara and Robert Young do play a very accepting heterosexual couple popping out the babies to supply the post-war Baby Boom, but totally open to others into their home even if she initially thought Clifton Webb's "Lynn" Belvedere was a woman! (Well, he is no woman. He is a genius.)

I get a sense that, if one of their sons "came out" (since the oldest boy, Larry, would be in high school by, say, middle '50s), they might be fearful of his safety but would certainly support him. After all, they were comfortable with Lynn raising them AND declaring at the end of this movie that they are planning another child for him to raise.

As for Richard Haydn's Clarence Appleton and his obsession with "breeding" irises... and his equal obsession with another very "out" resident in this heterosexual baby farmland known as suburbia, when before he only had his mother as his friend...

Well, to put it bluntly. Lynn is Out & Proud. He is a genius, after all. He has NOTHING to be ashamed of. He speaks his mind regardless of what anybody thinks. He exposes all truths in his best selling book and... boy! Just wait until all of suburbia's secrets increase with the rise of McCarthysim in the next two years! Lynn Belvedere is exactly the type of role model any child should emulate. Certainly NOT Clarence, who is one "appleton" that doesn't fall far from his mother's wheelchair. I understand him helping her out with her health problems. All good sons do that for their mother. Yet morphing into her bigoted personality and eavesdropping on others' private lives???!! Well... he spread the pollen and Lynn reaped the harvest. ?

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20 hours ago, Jlewis said:

Not to get off topic here, the whole point being funny captions, but... Sitting Pretty is a movie that probably deserves a thread all its own in the "LGBT" arena. In fact, that might be a good idea. Feel free to move the discussion, because there is sssssoooooo much to analyze here.

For one thing, we have the timing of its release, being filmed in 1947 and shown in theaters in March of '48, only a month and a half after the Alfred Kinsey team's Sexual Behavior Of The Human Male rocked America like no other science book. Before this time, homosexuality was pretty much ignored. Now it was considered more... *gasp*... normal by some "expert" and his team. I suspect... OK, I know based on all that I have read and heard... that a major panic gripped this country thanks to both Kinsey books in '48 and '53 (female version suggesting lesbianism isn't a myth), which is why a major witch hunt investigated the workforce during the next decade and those in the closet had to keep their doors shut more tightly than in previous decades. That is, until the pressure got too great in the later sixties and it all exploded via Stonewall and Boys In The Band.

Yet there is so much good in this film that reflects a more broad minded thinking that was ahead of its time.

On the positive side, Maureen O'Hara and Robert Young do play a very accepting heterosexual couple popping out the babies to supply the post-war Baby Boom, but totally open to others into their home even if she initially thought Clifton Webb's "Lynn" Belvedere was a woman! (Well, he is no woman. He is a genius.)

I get a sense that, if one of their sons "came out" (since the oldest boy, Larry, would be in high school by, say, middle '50s), they might be fearful of his safety but would certainly support him. After all, they were comfortable with Lynn raising them AND declaring at the end of this movie that they are planning another child for him to raise.

As for Richard Haydn's Clarence Appleton and his obsession with "breeding" irises... and his equal obsession with another very "out" resident in this heterosexual baby farmland known as suburbia, when before he only had his mother as his friend...

Well, to put it bluntly. Lynn is Out & Proud. He is a genius, after all. He has NOTHING to be ashamed of. He speaks his mind regardless of what anybody thinks. He exposes all truths in his best selling book and... boy! Just wait until all of suburbia's secrets increase with the rise of McCarthysim in the next two years! Lynn Belvedere is exactly the type of role model any child should emulate. Certainly NOT Clarence, who is one "appleton" that doesn't fall far from his mother's wheelchair. I understand him helping her out with her health problems. All good sons do that for their mother. Yet morphing into her bigoted personality and eavesdropping on others' private lives???!! Well... he spread the pollen and Lynn reaped the harvest. ?

This film does deserve a thread of its' own.

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... or I can keep it brief so that the captions can continue on this thread.

Re-watched it again last night. Oh Boy! Even though I have seen it four times in two decades, it never fails to intrigue me. I only realized in this fourth viewing that Clarence's very first meeting with Lynn is a "hit-on", inviting him to visit him and Mother for sherry. (Perhaps Clarence overheard six-year old Larry tell Pop he thinks Mr. Belvedere is "cute"?) Yet Clarence does NOT turn Lynn on at all. (I think he would have favored Dana Andrews' Mark McPherson instead.) The way Lynn puts down Clarence is downright sadistic, especially in regards to how much he detests sherry. This begins the Great Revenge... and the scene of Clarence and Mother watching Lynn dancing with... with... Mrs. King... I mean, a woman!... is just priceless.

The theme song over the main credits is "Pretty Baby" which you can wikipedia for its own unusual history.

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4 hours ago, Jlewis said:

... or I can keep it brief so that the captions can continue on this thread.

Re-watched it again last night. Oh Boy! Even though I have seen it four times in two decades, it never fails to intrigue me. I only realized in this fourth viewing that Clarence's very first meeting with Lynn is a "hit-on", inviting him to visit him and Mother for sherry. (Perhaps Clarence overheard six-year old Larry tell Pop he thinks Mr. Belvedere is "cute"?) Yet Clarence does NOT turn Lynn on at all. (I think he would have favored Dana Andrews' Mark McPherson instead.) The way Lynn puts down Clarence is downright sadistic, especially in regards to how much he detests sherry. This begins the Great Revenge... and the scene of Clarence and Mother watching Lynn dancing with... with... Mrs. King... I mean, a woman!... is just priceless.

The theme song over the main credits is "Pretty Baby" which you can wikipedia for its own unusual history.

I like how you've been rediscovering SITTING PRETTY. I remember when I saw it on the old AMC in the late 80s.

At the time I was a teenager who babysat kids from some of the families at our church. One family lived around the corner and it was convenient for them to call me over frequently. The Skelton boys (no relation to Red) were holy terrors. So when I saw SITTING PRETTY, of course I immediately loved how Belvedere got control of the kids. 

The only way I could keep the neighbor boys from getting into mischief was to entertain them by putting things over my head. Things like water, funny hats and pajama bottoms. I was ready for vaudeville after testing out my shtick with the Skeltons.

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

I like how you've been rediscovering SITTING PRETTY. I remember when I saw it on the old AMC in the late 80s.

At the time I was a teenager who babysat kids from some of the families at our church. One family lived around the corner and it was convenient for them to call me over frequently. The Skelton boys (no relation to Red) were holy terrors. So when I saw SITTING PRETTY, of course I immediately loved how Belvedere got control of the kids. 

The only way I could keep the neighbor boys from getting into mischief was to entertain them by putting things over my head. Things like water, funny hats and pajama bottoms. I was ready for vaudeville after testing out my shtick with the Skeltons.

I will start a new thread. Can't resist.

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It looks like it's from one of the German Winnetou and Old Shatterhand movies. They were based on a series of popular German novels, and starred Pierre Brice as Winnetou and Lex Barker as Old Shatterhand.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winnetou#Karl_May_movies_with_Winnetou_character

Yes, that's it, "Winnetou", a film that Les Barker made in Germany with Pierre Brice.

 

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