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speedracer5

History of Blackface (Yellow Face, etc.) in Film.

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4 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I don't have any qualms about blackface in the movies, the times being what they were. My father was a Swede and there are several references in film how dopey the Swedes were. Are. Anyway,  sometimes I take offense to it, but again, those were the times. I went on a Star Trek themed cruise and hooked up with George Takai and his lovely mother. I had no idea at the time how he felt about the Charlie Chan films. If I did, I would have said something to him about it, because I just adore those movies. If you read the books, they are way worse, women having to walk ten feet behind their masters...

It's a shame you didn't ask George and his mother about their experience in the Japanese relocation camps during World War II.

I saw a documentary that he narrated and it was very enlightening about the kind of racism Japanese Americans experienced during World War II.

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14 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

It's a shame you didn't ask George and his mother about their experience in the Japanese relocation camps during World War II.

I saw a documentary that he narrated and it was very enlightening about the kind of racism Japanese Americans experienced during World War II.

I would have, but I wasn't sure it be the right subject. Besides, I was somewhat star struck. 

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14 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

It's a shame you didn't ask George and his mother about their experience in the Japanese relocation camps during World War II.

I saw a documentary that he narrated and it was very enlightening about the kind of racism Japanese Americans experienced during World War II.

The kind of racism the Americans suffered at the hands of the Japanese...WWII

https://time.com/3334677/pow-world-war-two-usa-japan/

 

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Yeah, I didn't really want to get into a political discussion, but since Princess was braver than me, I will now voice my support. Yes, the Japanese treatment of prisoners of war was horrible, but here in America we're talking about treatment of our own citizens because of their heritage or skin color, which is a shameful act that has repeated itself all too often. I don't necessarily see any moral equivalence.

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18 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I don't necessarily see any moral equivalence.

It would be:  Man's inhumanity to man*

*Robert Burns

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23 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

All American citizens deserve equal civil rights.

Maybe you don't agree with me.

There was some hypocrisy during WWII, we shot the Germans responsible for killing American POW's called the Chenogne massacre,  We did the same thing to Japaneses POW's and nothing was done.  

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On 5/30/2018 at 1:20 AM, speedracer5 said:

In the golden age of Hollywood, oftentimes actors were made up to resemble another ethnicity.  Typically it was white actors dressed up to look Asian, African American, Hispanic, etc.  Some of the portrayals are okay (read: not great) but at least they aren't presented as absurd caricatures.  Though many times, it is very apparent that the actor is not the ethnicity he or she is supposed to be--Shirley MacLaine in Gambit comes to mind (MacLaine, Asian? please).  Some of these portrayals are horrible--Mickey Rooney as Japanese Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany's is the most obvious example. 

I am bring this thread up again because it seems like a talking point right now, but also because I decided to do a bit of a test late last night. It involved Breakfast at Tiffany's and the unnecessary character of Mr. Yunioshi, a role that would have been ill-advised no matter who played it. If you count the times that he is heard but not seen in addition to the time he is on screen, Mickey Rooney's entire performance takes up a little shy of 2 minutes and 23 seconds, or not quite 2.1% of Breakfast at Tiffany's runtime.  The film could have spared itself a lot of controversy by cutting that time out. 

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3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I am bring this thread up again because it seems like a talking point right now, but also because I decided to do a bit of a test late last night. It involved Breakfast at Tiffany's and the unnecessary character of Mr. Yunioshi, a role that would have been ill-advised no matter who played it. If you count the times that he is heard but not seen in addition to the time he is on screen, Mickey Rooney's entire performance takes up a little shy of 2 minutes and 23 seconds, or not quite 2.1% of Breakfast at Tiffany's runtime.  The film could have spared itself a lot of controversy by cutting that time out. 

Edwards should have cast this guy in the role of the landlord;   the character was NOT 'unnecessary' since it was another way to show how entitled Holly felt she was and how she tended to treat everyday folks,  like a neighbor or landlord.     (but I assume you meant unnecessary to be Asian,  or from any specific ethnic group).

This guy was able to handle Benjamin,  as well as Jack Tripper!

Mr Roper GIF | Gfycat

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3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I am bring this thread up again because it seems like a talking point right now, but also because I decided to do a bit of a test late last night. It involved Breakfast at Tiffany's and the unnecessary character of Mr. Yunioshi, a role that would have been ill-advised no matter who played it. If you count the times that he is heard but not seen in addition to the time he is on screen, Mickey Rooney's entire performance takes up a little shy of 2 minutes and 23 seconds, or not quite 2.1% of Breakfast at Tiffany's runtime.  The film could have spared itself a lot of controversy by cutting that time out. 

Mr. Yunioshi is a character in Truman Capote's original novel.  So I can see why he was in the movie. However, in the book, Mr. Yunioshi was a photographer, and was just another of Holly's neighbors.  He becomes irritated with Holly when she keeps losing her key and consequently buzzing his apartment over and over. In the film, the Mr. Yunioshi character could have easily been removed, or Blake Edwards could have cast anyone in the role (and changed the name if not casting an Asian actor).  It didn't require Mickey Rooney's horrible stereotypical portrayal.  Even in 1961, in the midst of the Civil Rights movement, Rooney's portrayal is offensive. 

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Yeah, or like Pat Morita wasn't available or somethin'???

IF Edwards wanted to stay true to Capote's novel, that it.

(...of course then again, Edwards didn't stay true to Capote's vision of who should have played the female lead in it either, and so there's that too)

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45 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, or like Pat Morita wasn't available or somethin'???

IF Edwards wanted to stay true to Capote's novel, that it.

(...of course then again, Edwards didn't stay true to Capote's vision of who should have played the female lead in it either, and so there's that too)

I'd be curious to know how many of Audrey Hepburn's "woke" admirers, especially those who idolize her iconic Holly Golightly aesthetic, have actually seen the film.  Would they feel conflicted idolizing Holly, but at the same time, being confronted with Rooney's offensive yellow-face portrayal?

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1 minute ago, speedracer5 said:

I'd be curious to know how many of Audrey Hepburn's "woke" admirers, especially those who idolize her iconic Holly Golightly aesthetic, have actually seen the film.  Would they feel conflicted idolizing Holly, but at the same time, being confronted with Rooney's offensive yellow-face portrayal?

Yeah, maybe, but then again personally I've never idolized Audrey's portrayal of Holly, as I'm one of those people who think she was badly miscast in the role, as there's no way in hell Audrey would've ever been from some little backwater town in Texas. Nope, no matter how much she tries, she still has Europe written all over her.

(...nope, I've always thought Capote was right and that MM would have been a much better fit)

 

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Mr. Yunioshi is a character in Truman Capote's original novel.  So I can see why he was in the movie. However, in the book, Mr. Yunioshi was a photographer, and was just another of Holly's neighbors.  He becomes irritated with Holly when she keeps losing her key and consequently buzzing his apartment over and over. In the film, the Mr. Yunioshi character could have easily been removed, or Blake Edwards could have cast anyone in the role (and changed the name if not casting an Asian actor).  It didn't require Mickey Rooney's horrible stereotypical portrayal.  Even in 1961, in the midst of the Civil Rights movement, Rooney's portrayal is offensive. 

Speedy, you're right, the neighbor was in the novel. Mickey Rooney has said in many interviews that Blake Edwards wanted him to play the character in an over the top way. As much as I think Blake Edwards has directed many wonderful films, if it's true that Edwards wanted this performance out of Mickey and I believe he did, then I think the fault lies with Edwards, not Mickey. 

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18 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Speedy, you're right, the neighbor was in the novel. Mickey Rooney has said in many interviews that Blake Edwards wanted him to play the character in an over the top way. As much as I think Blake Edwards has directed many wonderful films, if it's true that Edwards wanted this performance out of Mickey and I believe he did, then I think the fault lies with Edwards, not Mickey. 

Had Edwards decided to go another direction with the exasperated neighbor, and eliminated the part of “Mr. Yunioshi,” Paul Lynde would have been a great choice. 

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9 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Had Edwards decided to go another direction with the exasperated neighbor, and eliminated the part of “Mr. Yunioshi,” Paul Lynde would have been a great choice. 

Yeah maybe, but then you might be runnin' the risk of just replacing ONE stereotype with ANOTHER!

(...in this case of course, "the closeted gay neighbor")

LOL

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Wonder Bar (1934) has many blackface scenes but my favorite scene of the movie involves a different stereotype:

 

 

 

 

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