Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

On 6/3/2018 at 8:28 AM, Suzanne1228 said:

All great choices!  Begin the Beguine is, in my opinion, one of the greatest dance numbers ever and some of the greatest black and white photography in any film.  Outside of the Judy Garland segment in That's Entertainment! I think it was the sequence that intrigued and touched me the most.  It sparked my quest to see all those other movies that were featured in the clips.

Speaking of Broadway Melody of 1940, I have a small personal connection to this film. The couple in this scene are Arren and Broderick, their daughter Pat is my boss at a showroom in Las Vegas. She has a ton of stories from their vaudeville and showroom days. I get so tickled just thinking about it.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! The Unsinkable Molly Brown, The Sound of Music, Victor Victoria, almost everything with Gene Kelly...so many! For me it’s the music and lyrics... I love when they mad Tv renditions of musicals a few years ago. I even forgave them for casting Glenn Close as Nurse Nelly in South Pacific, because I loved that score.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/3/2018 at 1:10 PM, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:

We Judy fans are a special bunch. That woman was so unique. I will never forget the day we lost her. 

It was my 5th birthday. I used to wish I believed in reincarnation, just to get some of her talent. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/3/2018 at 1:04 PM, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:

So, then the fact that my son and I break out into song in NYC waiting for a train is, uh....a little bizarre is an understatement?

I tend to break out into song almost every time I hear anything remotely resembling a song lyric. It's almost uncontrollable. I also rewrite lyrics to fit the situation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love so many musicals - The Wizard of Oz, West Side Story, Here Comes the Groom, Singin in the Rain, That's Entertainment!, Meet Me in St. Louis, Oklahoma, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Guys & Dolls, An American in Paris, White Christmas, etc. I grew up watching these movies with my family, as well as many classic movies, and my love has continued to grow. I love discovering movies and musicals that are new to me, so I am looking forward to many new adventures during this course.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of my favorite are, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Seven Brides for seven Brothers and West Side story. I love the athleticism when it comes to the dances and the strength they have when dancing. 

Any musical with Gene Kelly, (American in Paris, Singing in the Rain) he always made dancing look so easy. I never danced as a child, but tried tap dancing as an adult because I love the dance routines in musicals. 

I thank my mom who I would watch musicals with and learned to love them!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

An American in Paris is my absolute favorite. All the songs in the musical are by Gershwin, and I love every single one. "Love is Here to Stay," "I'll Build a Stairway (to Paradise)," "S'Wonderful," "Nice Work If You Can Get It," "By Strauss," "I Got Rhythm," "Tra-La-La," "Concerto in F," and of course the two not used in the film ("Love Walked In" and "I've Got a Crush On You) are amazing compositions, and I find myself listening to them everyday. Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron work so well together; Georges Guétary and Oscar Levant are perfectly cast as well. I first watched An American in Paris on TCM, and I cannot wait to learn about it in the course! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Rosy Torres said:

Hello everyone:

As far back as I can remember I have always enjoyed a musical. I would have to say that "An American in Paris" and "Meet Me in St. Louis" are two of the ones I keep watching over and over. I'm filled with joy when when I'm watching them. It is definitely the optimism and overall good will portrayed in theses films that keep me coming back. Those fantastic musical numbers also play a part. They leave me in a great mood. I think that how a fillm makes us feel as we watch has a lot to with with how many times we see it.

These are two of my favorites as well! Love love love both! I am so glad they are part of the content in the course.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, gigiworks said:

Always on my list is An American in Paris, well basically anything with Gene Kelly, and I adore Funny Face with Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn. When you examine the styles of Gene and Fred, your first impression is they are different; but in actuality they are very similar in timeless perfection and joy in movement. 

YES! Funny Face is SO GOOD! "Bonjour, Paris," "S'Wonderful," "Funny Face," "Clap Yo Hands," are AMAZING songs! An American in Paris has my whole heart at well. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A little late to the table here but probably my most watched has been "The Wizard of Oz" and always seem to watch it in full or part. Must have seen it 50+ times.  My other favorites are "My Fair Lady", "West Side Story", "Robin and the 7 Hoods", "Carousel", and most of the Astaire/Rogers films.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Paint your Wagon & Into the Woods...these obv have nothing to do w/ these old black & white musicals yet I watch these over & over...Paint Your Wagon has some great music & singing & dancing & I strongly identify with this movie for some reason "Born Under A Wandering Star" stays with me & Into The Woods...well it's a fairy tale story & who doesn't like those...especially since I grew up on these re-telling of the Grimm tales & it has led me to others & to seek & find the originals...Disney re-told these of course in their own image but, it led to more research through all these years I have studied

Link to post
Share on other sites

Singin’ in the Rain, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, The Sound of Music, West Side Story, The Barkleys of Broadway, The Band Wagon, An American in Paris and currently The Greatest Showman are the movie musicals that I watch over and over again. I think it’s a combination of the music and choreography of the dances that draw me in.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Others have approached the question in the form of “What is your favorite musical?” but that was not the question. The question was “What movie do you find yourself watching repeatedly...?” The movie that I watch repeatedly is “Holiday Inn”. As others have stated, I have watched the movie so often, that although I may not be able to doall the dialogue as it happens, I can definitely sing each of the songs as they appear in their correct order.

 I watch this movie repeatedly for at least the following reasons and perhaps others:

1. I recall watching it every December, sometimes multiple times from December through January, while growing up. The film therefore is nostalgic for me. I can vividly recall watching it with my family.

2. I also watch it to see if it continues to be edited like it was when I saw it for the first time after moving to Minnesota. The year was 1978, in the winter, likely after Thanksgiving but before the New Year. I noticed that the movie was to be played and sat down eagerly to watch and relive all the scenes. The holiday is Lincoln’s birthday and as was true of every holiday there was a song and dance number. For this particular holiday, Bing Crosby and everyone else was decked out in blackface. This was done in the movie in the hopes of hiding Bing’s newly found dance partner from Fred Astaire. The scene that was cut in this particular edit was that of the maid Mamie (Louise Beaver, I believe) singing to her children. She sings “Who was it set the **** free?” And they response “Abraham”. The entire scene with Mamie and her children was cut from the movie when I viewed it that year. In subsequent viewings sometimes the entire Lincoln’s birthday number is left in, other times the edit was like it was in 1978 and one year the entire Lincoln’s birthday number was deleted. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers , The Music Man and Calamity Jane - All are gorgeous to watch, beautiful to listen to and so much fun!

Fiddler on the Roof  - speaks to the soul, nightmare scene has no equal!

Oliver - great emotion, both tragic and triumphant, singable songs

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, JDC_NYC said:

A little late to the table here but probably my most watched has been "The Wizard of Oz" and always seem to watch it in full or part. Must have seen it 50+ times.  My other favorites are "My Fair Lady", "West Side Story", "Robin and the 7 Hoods", "Carousel", and most of the Astaire/Rogers films.

Forgot to add Robin and the 7 Hoods to my list - such a classy and enjoyable movie!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of my favorites are Music Man, The Sound of Music, Fiddler on the Roof, West Side Story, My Fair Lady, Holiday Inn, Mary Poppins, Gypsy, Hello Dolly, and Guys and Dolls. But there are so many more I could list! I think what makes me come back to these musicals are the stories and the songs. The songs stick with me and they come up in my brain as responses to situations I encounter. The stories often are an escape for me to either a simpler time or just a setting than one that is familiar to me. Whatever the reason, musicals bring me joy. I love them!

Link to post
Share on other sites

In middle school my choir teacher educated us by making us watch movie musicals at the end of every semester, and I loved all of them but my absolute favorite one that I can quote and watch at all times of the year is White Christmas (1954). There's something about Rosemary Clooney in this movie that I absolutely adore, and Vera Ellen's tap number in Choreography blows my mind every time. The chemistry between Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye in this movie is great as well. Outside of that, I could probably watch Mary Poppins (1964) for the rest of my life and never get bored, but White Christmas takes the cake.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This 1936 version of Broadway Meledy...a few notes on highlights that I found humorous & this assumes people have already watched this movie...this is not a true summary

Snoring dialogue turns up in two separate scenes w/ the same Professor of snoring providing the humor & he is a good snorer ...this supports the idea of separate sleeping chambers...for all of those people living w/ a ...snorer!!! No further comments from me on this!!! :) 

The skylight shadow dancing leads to a rooftop 'breakie'   the cute song & tap dance number 'sing for breakfast' w/ (Buddy Ebsen) Ted Burke character ...wiki reported this was Ebsen's first role

Doughnut dunking...um...made me want a doughnut...demo on doughnut dunkin' & this scene is also repeated like the snoring scenes...someone liked those particularly...they were great fun!!! :)

'choke the socks off you' Kitty Corbett (Una Merkel) & more doughnuts (2nd doughnut scene)

The La Belle Arlette 'cigar girl' is a nice plot twist & the foreign language practice scenes & the "Hi ya Kitty" gives the plot twist away to yet more characters in on it

The ticket-switch-a-roo & the tap number 'Sunday Afternoon' is cute...wow, Ebsen's bold pattern suit is hard to forget & more lace & ruffles for the ladies...seems to be a recurring dress requirement for these musical ladies

This movie ends w/ a BIG number & BIG sets

NOTE:  This movie & the others I have watched mentions motion pictures vs live performance & we can see how things were changing from silent film to 'talkies'...putting some people out of work who could not change w/the times or keep up the requirements for these changes

Frances Langford  (herself) in this film was dubbed here but wiki said she did record this song w/ a  big band afterward...so she could sing 

Harry Stockwell (himself) also in this film

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have probably seen Gigi more than any other musical.  I love the music.  The script is excellent -- I love the scenes with Aunt Alicia.  And I am a big fan of Hermione Gingold and Maurice Chevalier.  The way Vincente Minnelli just turns the camera on him and lets him work his charm is a joy.  Leslie Caron has never been better, and Louis Jourdan is just perfect as Gaston.  It is just so joyous.

A close second must be The Music Man.  I love every song.  And Robert Preston, Shirley Jones, Hermione Gingold (again), Paul Ford, Buddy Hackett are joys to enjoy over and over.

I also love The Pirate for the wonderful score by Cole Porter.  It doesn't really matter if none of the songs became standards, they are all wonderful songs.  The script is one of the more literary of musical scripts with many twists in the action as a character puts together another piece of the puzzle.  And the performances by Judy Garland, Gene Kelley and especially the Nicholas Brothers are outstanding.

Others that I have enjoyed over and over are Singin' in the Rain, The Bandwagon, Silk Stockings and Easter Parade (as if Judy Garland and Fred Astaire are not enough, we also get the spectacular Ann Miller).  I guess I love the high gloss of the MGM musicals in their prime.  But I also love Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.  A guilty pleasure of mine is The Boyfriend, which pays loving homage to the Busby Berkeley musicals while keeping tongue firmly in cheek.

It is hard to pick a favorite Astaire and Rogers musical.  Most of the scripts are rather dated, so I have to choose based on my favorite dance numbers.  And I think my favorite is "Let's Face the Music and Dance" from Follow the Fleet.  The dancing is so exquisite and runs the gamut of emotions.

Finally, I love Saturday Night Fever.  The songs are great and the dancing inspirational.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/3/2018 at 12:26 PM, RTHardiman said:

I discovered Little Shop of Horrors when I was in 7th grade and it is, far and away, the most watched musical in my canon of films. I love acting and my dream role since then has been Seymour, and I often find myself singing Little Shop songs in the shower and at karaoke. It's my favorite!

"Skid Row" is one of the most jaw dropping numbers from any musical.  I could watch it over and over.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/3/2018 at 1:58 PM, Lover-o-Classics said:

Chicago was a fabulous movie musical.  In many cases, the film version doesn't measure up to the stage production of the show, even with all the visual effects that can be created (...though it really depends which stage production you've seen.  Dreamgirls was magnificent on Broadway... so-so in Toronto).  To me, the movie version of Chicago was brilliantly conceived and created, and one I can enjoy over and over.  Far superior to the stage version I saw.   

Chicago must have been a difficult show to transfer to the screen as it told its story using the conventions of a vaudeville show, which has deep roots in stage tradition.  This is much more tied to stage conventions than Cabaret, which used the conventions of a cabaret show to tell its story.  The film of Chicago stayed true to its vaudeville format more so than the film Cabaret which IMHO presented the cabaret as part of the story and downplayed its use as a story-telling device. 

I wonder if we will ever see a film of The Scottsboro Boys, yet another Kander & Ebb musical that told its story (and its a story that needs to be repeated often) using the conventions of a minstrel show.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite musical is Brigadoon.  The chemistry between Gene Kelly & Cyd Charisse leaves me as breathless as Tommy was when he dances with Fiona at the wedding!  Van Johnson in the role of Tommy's best friend Jeff plays his usual post-WWII somewhat world-weary, sarcastic character, but has a couple of truly touching moments, when talking about the character of Harry.  The lush Technicolor, memorable songs, beautiful dance numbers, and the story provide a wonderful escape for a few precious hours from our modern cares.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite musical - West Side Story! George Chakiris, the Shark's- and Jet's- dancing, and the turmoil of young star-crossed lovers, just - ever so slightly - beats out Singin' In the Rain and any Fred Astaire movie. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, my top three are: Sound of Music - all the songs we sang as children & now, love to go to a sing-a-long events! Wizard of Oz - great to sing along to, & I always wished, "...Somewhere over the rainbow, skies are blue and the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true. Someday I'll wish upon a star and wake up where the clouds are far behind me.Where troubles melt like lemon drops. Away above the chimney tops, that's where you'll find me.Somewhere over the rainbow, bluebirds fly,Birds fly over the rainbow, why then, oh why can't I? If happy little bluebirds fly beyond the rainbow, Why oh why can't I?"And, last, Meet Me In St. Louis - twist my arm to love a Judy Garland musical :) All of these are films I own, and watch and re-watch in my home - however, if they are on TCM or play in a theater or community event; I am very excited to participate! It is so nice to get out amongst fellow film aficionados and young families seeing the classics for their first times...Really looking forward to this class, the interactions with all of you, and being guided through watching so many great films this June!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...