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Hi April,

 

I think Elwood says to Sanderson that Harvey likes Veta but that Veta doesn't seem to care too much for Harvey.

 

I believe they definitely have an ongoing relationship and that Harvey does indeed like Veta. Remember at the end she finally gives in.

 

She finally says it out loud:

harvey-47.jpg?t=1238907550

 

Elwood looks a little surprised:

harvey-48.jpg?t=1238907595

 

Maybe even proud:

harvey-49.jpg?t=1238907629

harvey-50.jpg?t=1238907671

 

So do Elwood, Veta and Harvey live happily ever after? :)

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Lol!! I forgot about the ending! I remember thinking how cute Veta looked,

standing up to the Judge and defending the Dowd Pooka Honor. :D

 

I think she and Harvey make an adorable couple. :)

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> So desperate to be accepted as normal and conforming, Veta would turn away something as miraculous as a Pooka, out of fear of not fitting in. She only wishes Elwood would do the same. Veta thinks people just shouldn't go around seeing pookas and such. It just isn't done, and it isn't normal, and it's kind of spooky and she doesn't want to deal with it. Harvey, for his part, is attracted to a side of Veta that she herself is always trying to suppress. I think this is actually addressed more in the play but there is plenty of it in the film.

 

It's not a bad point, there are many reasons why people desperately want to conform to society's norms, and she realizes that if she openly admitted seeing Harvey, she might not be so easily accepted by others.

 

On the other hand, she does seem to reach some kind of epiphany after she hears the cab driver who has taken them to Chumley's rest. The stuff about how "they" come there feeling a certain way, and how after they're injected, they become more irritable and grouchy and less able to see life in a whimsical kind of way. I think that's what convinces Veta that Elwood should not be injected.

 

And of course, she later realizes that the reason she couldn't find her coin purse earlier when trying to pay the taxi driver was that Harvey didn't want her to find it, because that's what leads to her having the longer dialogue with the taxi driver.

 

> So do Elwood, Veta and Harvey live happily ever after? :)

 

One can certainly hope so. Maybe they'll even have a new painting made? ;)

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Veta doesn't question so much whether Harvey is real, though I'm sure she hasn't come to terms with it, instead she is more concerned that Harvey has latched on to Elwood. This causes him to be an embarrassment to her and an impediment to how she wants Elwood to be and to the course she wants her own life to take.

 

So desperate to be accepted as normal and conforming, Veta would turn away something as miraculous as a Pooka, out of fear of not fitting in. She only wishes Elwood would do the same. Veta thinks people just shouldn't go around seeing pookas and such. It just isn't done, and it isn't normal, and it's kind of spooky and she doesn't want to deal with it.

She may wonder how he could be there, but I think she knows Harvey is there.

 

By George, I think you've got it! :-)

 

I think you are right and I would also say that the biggest problem Veta has w/ Harvey is that he makes Elwood seem even more "out of whack" and out of touch w/ the world than he likely already is. I think she wants Elwood to "conform" so that they can have all the trappings of polite society that she obviously is accustomed to (and that she thinks they all deserve) and that she's likely wanted this for a long while (even before Harvey showed up)

 

She wants Elwood to shape up and have a prestigious job. And she wants to be accepted by all the best women in society as much as she wants Myrtle Mae to have the best chance at a good marriage to the right man. And she also wants the "upper crust" folks that their aunt associates with to be a part of her life and her family's life... and for the all to "fit in" with that social circle.

 

And I think she would be bothered by Harvey whether he was a rabbit or just a guy... It's not him being an invisible bunny that upsets her so much as it is that Elwood has more or less settled in to his friendship with Harvey seemingly w/out a care in the world.

 

Oh sure.... she is likely bothered by the prospect of her brother's best friend being a big white invisible rabbit.... but mostly because Elwood (as you pointed out) doesn't keep it quiet. And she is likely bothered even more in being able to see him for herself as well.

 

But I think that the thing that bothers her most... more than all of that.. is that Harvey is the one that Elwood has chosen to relate to and be with, rather than living up to what she sees as his rightful place in society and fulfilling what she believes is his obligation to her and the rest of the family.

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> But I think that the thing that bothers her most... more than all of that.. is that Harvey is the one that Elwood has chosen to relate to and be with, rather than living up to what she sees as his rightful place in society and fulfilling what she believes is his obligation to her and the rest of the family.

 

Harvey's certainly the part of Elwood's life that is most glaringly at odds with the upper-middle class respectability that Veta so desperately wants for herself and Myrtle Mae. And it's certainly the reason she becomes desperate enough to try to get him comitted at Chumley's Rest. Without Harvey, Elwood would just be the eccentric old uncle who spent perhaps a bit too much time at the bar but was otherwise totally harmless.

 

Also, I don't know that it's so much a matter of Elwood choosing to spend time with Harvey, but the other way around. After all, near the end of the movie Elwood tells Harvey it's perfectly OK if he wants to stay behind at Chumley's and spend some time shooting the breeze with Dr. Chumley, but eventually Harvey decides to leave and go back to Elwood.

 

It seems to me that for any number of reasons, Harvey and Elwood just happen to be in the same "wavelength" so to speak.

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I see a vague parallel between *Harvey* and another movie that was released that same year, the Disney version of *Peter Pan*. Both deal with a sort of "alternate reality" with fantastic things going on that the majority of people can't really see.

 

Or maybe they've just forgotten they can see them, like Wendy's father at the end of *Peter Pan*, where he sees Hook's ship and is immediately reminded of something that seems to have happened a long, long time ago.

 

So whether it's Harvey or Peter Pan, there is a common theme of benign forces that most people are unable or unwilling to acknowledge them, partly because they want to conform to society and they're afraid they might not be taken seriously otherwise, or they think they're being "smart" and "practical". They don't realize what they might be missing out on.

 

A similar theme was also expressed a decade and a half later, in *Mary Poppins*.

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Pretty sharp analysis, calypsogal! :D

 

(See? I can spell! :P )

 

The whole "living in denial of the magical/whimsical" genre is indeed a time-honored tradition, and one that continues to be popular today - just look at the success of the Harry Potter movies. They're all about magical stuff that regular humans can't see. Just like Harvey. B-)

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Molo - I absolutely adore what you wrote about Veta and Harvey.

 

Ro, I think you are right about Veta. But I think she cares about society because she sees it as the saving of her family and it's happiness. But of course, her family's happiness really depends on her acceptance of.......

 

So, is *Harvey* really the story of _Veta's_ redemption? :) That's it.... It's really Veta's story!

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One could certainly say that Veta is the character with the most interesting arc in the story. Elwood doesn't change very much during the course of the movie. Harvey doesn't change. But Veta does change, and (to a much lesser extent perhaps) so does Dr. Chumley.

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I guess that's what makes Harvey such a great movie. Elwood, Harvey, Dr. Chumley, Myrtle Mae, Veta, etc. are ALL such engaging characters. They can all stand alone in the movie and it's why classics are classics. I think a lot of today's movies are full of needless characters (just my opinion). I always love reading everyone's analysis of these movies. Someone is sure to bring up something I didn't think about.

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My fellow Harvey fans: *A word of caution. Please do not let this happen to you!*

 

I don't usually go to the mall but I had to take mom to get new glasses and that's where we had to go. While she was waiting I stepped out for some...um...fresh air. I went back in the mall and when I looked up, there was a giant white rabbit walking just a few feet ahead of me! Excited, but also a little nervous, I walked on toward him. It was then that I discovered that he was just a big ole' mall Easter bunny apparently returning from a break. I had forgotten they did that sort of thing for kids theses days. I should have known that Pookas probably don't frequent malls anyway.

 

Disappointed, I headed back to LensCrafters. It's a good thing I wasn't spiffed!! ;)

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there was a giant white rabbit walking just a few feet ahead of me!

 

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha and ha!!!!!

 

That is TOO funny... and PS... welcome to my world.... I have had NUMEROUS similar experiences in malls and stores with white rabbits, kindly and jolly rotund old men dressed in red, sporting flowing white beards .... even Tony the Tiger. And I am always compelled by the iron will of a VERY determined six year old child to not only "follow after" (out of curiosity) these sorts of "mall creatures" during a variety of holiday seasons... but also to stop, chat, and get our picture taken!! HA! :D

 

It's a good thing I wasn't spiffed!!

 

And your evidence for THAT would be.........?? :P

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hey larry and everyone!

 

thank you for inviting me to come join you.....i actually just got news that Harvey will be playing on the big screen at The Alamo Drafthouse Theater in Austin soon, so i might just have to go. i havent seen this one on the big screen yet.....its such a wonderful movie and one of the top Jimmy Stewart performances.i just loved his character in the movie....when i first saw it, grandmama had told me that it was about a man who saw an imaginary bunny and i thought it would be this too cheesy of a movie, but when i saw it, it quickly became one of my favorites to watch with grandmama and grandpapa. we just watched it the other day together and had mint chocolate ice cream and pineapple upsidedown cake with it. yummy! it was a grandparents, granddaughter kind of day. heehee!

 

what do you think of his character? what are your thoughts on how his family treats him? poor baby, i just wanted to give him a hug and a kiss on the cheek the whole time, b/c his momma wouldnt. heehee!

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Well looked who stopped by!!

 

Hi there Theresa, :)

 

Are you heading for Charlie's Bar or Chumley's Rest? ;)

 

Did you bring your pooka? You should definitely go see Harvey at the theater. I would love to see the film with an audience.

 

We are talking about Elwood, Veta, Harvey etc. from all kinds of different angles. I'll stop back by here tomorrow. Fortunately Charlie's stays open rather late. You might find Mr. Grimes, Kathy and the rest of the gang over there!

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Hey, look who it is!

 

RioBravo-165.jpg

 

Where have you been, stranger?

 

> {quote:title=butterscotchgreer wrote:}{quote}

> hey larry and everyone!

> thank you for inviting me to come join you.....i actually just got news that Harvey will be

> playing on the big screen at The Alamo Drafthouse Theater in Austin soon, so i might just have to go.

 

Rub it in, rub it in, rub it in! :P:P

 

> i havent seen this one on the big screen yet.....its such a wonderful movie and one of the top Jimmy Stewart performances.i just loved his character in the movie....when i first saw it, grandmama had told me that it was about a man who saw an imaginary bunny and i thought it would be this too cheesy of a movie, but when i saw it, it quickly became one of my favorites to watch with grandmama and grandpapa. we just watched it the other day together and had mint chocolate ice cream and pineapple upsidedown cake with it. yummy! it was a grandparents, granddaughter kind of day. heehee!

>

 

With rabbits!

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hi larry!

 

*Are you heading for Charlie's Bar or Chumley's Rest?*

 

definitely Charlie's Bar. which one are you heading for?

 

 

*Did you bring your pooka? You should definitely go see Harvey at the theater. I would love to see the film with an audience.*

 

oh goodness, how could i forget my pooka? im looking orward to seeing it on the big screen. i wish all of you could come with me. we could have a Harvey screening party and have some fun!

 

*We are talking about Elwood, Veta, Harvey etc. from all kinds of different angles. I'll stop back by here tomorrow. Fortunately Charlie's stays open rather late. You might find Mr. Grimes, Kathy and the rest of the gang over there!*

 

oh goodie! i guess we have a lot of chahtting to do!

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Hey Theresa,

 

*definitely Charlie's Bar. which one are you heading for?*

 

Well in the short term I'll head over to Charlie's, however in the not so long term you'll probably find me at Chumley's Rest! :)

 

*oh goodness, how could i forget my pooka?*

 

Don't worry. I'm sure your pooka will find you.

 

*i wish all of you could come with me. we could have a Harvey screening party and have some fun!*

 

Well that does sound like fun! I'm not sure what it would be like having us all in the same room. I have a feeling you ladies might gang up on a certain fellow poster. Long black gloves, cold ropes, everybody spiffed!! Hey that really does sound like fun!! :D

 

*oh goodie! i guess we have a lot of chatting to do!*

 

It's a great film. It gives you a lift but it also gives you a lot to ponder. We've talked about Elwood a lot. How he might have come to first meet Harvey. Why Harvey might have picked out Elwood.

Was Elwood sad? Was he lonely? Both? What was he like before he met Harvey? Is Elwood using Harvey to escape or to cope? Has Elwood really found a better way?

 

Now you ponder all that and get right back to me. :D

 

I think one of the messages of *Harvey* is to not always worry about what others think. Conformity is not always the best path. You have to find whatever joy and peace you can in life.

 

As Veta says:

harvey-15.jpg?t=1239850944

 

Veta is a great character! She is just hilarious with all of her frantic gestures and her wonderful little comments throughout the film.

 

So do you have a favorite scene? Who is your favorite character?

 

Whatever you want to chat about regarding the film is fine by me. :)

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> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> Well in the short term I'll head over to Charlie's, however in the not so long term you'll probably find me at Chumley's Rest! :)

>

 

molo,

I think you'd be the last person anyone would expect to find at Chumley's Rest. ;)

 

> I think one of the messages of Harvey is to not always worry about what others think. Conformity is not always the best path. You have to find whatever joy and peace you can in life.

 

I think that's a great message. Giving in to conformity makes for a pretty boring life, imho! :P

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey there, Grahame's Guy -- Don't be thrown by these "ivory tower" types with

their four dollar words and their big "theories" about manifestations of the self conscious.

 

Ohhh, my goodness, I'm Lyman... without Nurse Kelly!

 

P O O K A - Pooka - from old Celtic mythology - a fairy spirit in animal form - always

very large. The pooka appears here and there - now and then - to this one and that

one - a benign but mischievous creature - very fond of rumpots, crackpots, and how are

you, Mr. Grimes?

 

:D Now that killed me! I do admit, I'm on the "Harvey isn't real" side of the aisle.

 

Is he really looking for Harvey? Is he? Again, I find all of this to be

rather sad and touching. Is Elwood truly happy? Is he at peace? He seems to be

a lonely man with many friends.

 

You ask a lot of good questions. Do you think Elwood, upon witnessing the blossoming relationship between Kelly and Sanderson, is longing, or maybe regretting, that he will

never have that kind of closeness? That he missed his chance? As for being happy and

at peace, I think Elwood copes well. He is still just coping though. Hey, aren't we all?

 

I feel Elwood does get a sense of longing and loss when he sees Kelly and Sanderson

dancing. He hasn't danced forever. Harvey can provide Elwood with great happiness

but not complete happiness. There are areas in Elwood's life where he is still going to

feel empty, with the love of a woman being a primary one.

 

Most of the characters are focused on something very particular in their life. Veta on

Myrtle Mae, Wilson on his job, Myrtle Mae on her future. Elwood doesn't have that sort

of thing driving him. He ponders the human condition, he ponders the roses, and when

you spend your time pondering life and the big picture, even to savor it, a little sadness

and loneliness has to come through. Doesn't it? Your last sentence speaks to that.

 

That was beautiful, and I think it really speaks to the heart of the film. Most of us

get caught up in chasing things that we believe will bring us "happiness" and many of us

end up losing sight of all the happiness that can be easily found all around us, every

day. Sure, some of us are more fortunate than others in certain areas of life, but not all.

 

My brother has told me about a mentally-challenged man who works with him. This man

always lights up whenever he sees my brother and they end up talking about things like

older television shows (70s and 80s) and toys. Yes, this man is a boy. I always tell my

brother, all I'd ever need to feel good about life is to spend one moment with a person

like that. It's also how I feel about young children. Just give me a moment with them, and

I will feel better.

 

And I'm glad you posted those critical screen caps of Elwood replacing the portrait of

his Mother with a portrait of he and Harvey. I believe we are being told of Elwood's emotional

state with that moment. Harvey IS filling the void of his mother. I believe Elwood always

turned to his mother for strength and encouragement and it's now Harvey who he turns to

for this. Harvey has replaced his mother.

 

I think that is a crucial point. It's something that my thoughts keep turning to as I think about Elwood's current situation. Everything points to Elwood and his mother being very close, though I don't think he ever mentions her. I do believe Elwood fell into a depression after his mother's death. He had no wife, no child to focus on. Harvey fills a void in Elwood's life that helps him greatly, but I still think that Elwood never really got past her death.

 

That is exactly how I feel about Elwood: the loss of his mother has greatly affected

him. And I believe you are correct, I don't think Elwood ever mentions his mother. That's

a nice catch.

 

One part of me believes Harvey came to be because Elwood's conscience caught up

with him. He saw himself headed down the same path as Ed Hickey and this brought

Harvey to life. Harvey had been there all along, but Elwood could never hear or see

him... until that night. For some reason, we are told of Ed Hickey and his being spiffed.

 

I was wondering what your take on that story would be. It's something that didn't occur to

me at first but I think it's a sound explanation. I tend to think that Elwood drinks more than

you and Jackie do. Oh wait...I mean more than you and Jackie think he does.

 

That made me laugh!

 

I do believe Elwood drinks but is no longer a drunk. Although, do we ever seen him take

a drink?

 

I think Elwood has been drinking to escape things for a long time, even before his

mother's death. I think he may have gotten worse after the loss, and quite possibly

saw himself going down the road of Ed Hicky but I think alcohol was, and remains,

a big part of his life.

 

I do believe Elwood was a drunk before but Ed Hickey's being "spiffed" woke him

up. But I wouldn't disagree with you saying he's still an alcoholic. Can a drunk all of a

sudden drink in moderation?

 

His greeting to Aunt Ethel is how he most likely always greeted her. She is quite

taken by him. He "hasn't changed." However, when he introduces her to Harvey, she

views him differently. In just a blink of an eye, something is revealed about Elwood,

and now Aunt Ethel wants nothing to do with him. He has changed. His pleasantness

goes right out the window. His "pooka" is how he is judged now.

 

She changes her disposition quite quickly. Is she in shock? For someone who loves

Elwood and is family, I wonder why she didn't take Veta aside for questioning. It's as

if the moment he introduces her to Harvey that's all she needs to know. She rushes

out immediately. It seemed counterintuitive to me. I guess his "pooka' was more than

she could deal with.

 

Many people judge others on the quick, especially those talking to imaginary "people."

I could share one opinion with many different people and they all would quickly process

that opinion and make a judgment on me. Is it a final judgment? It all depends.

 

The reason why I find Mrs. Chumley to be the most tragic figure in the film is

because she is being cheated on and I find her to be such a lovely woman. I find

this to be ironic and tragic. Mrs. Chumley is my third favorite character in the picture.

 

I will talk more about Dr. Chumley later. Now that you mention it, it is a sad situation for

her, even if she isn't fully aware of it.

 

That's an excellent point, and one I didn't think of. Mrs. Chumley's ignorance is bliss. Her

not knowing allows her to remain happy. Interesting.

 

What she must be aware of is how Dr. Chumley is so dismissive of her.

 

That's an interesting point, too. Does she actually think her husband is being dismissive of

her or does she view that as him being him? That's who he is, so she accepts that. Hmmm...

 

She does seem like quite a lovely and very open person. Contrast her to Aunt Ethel.

I wonder if Mrs. Chumley would have ran away? Notice how she doesn't flinch at Elwood's

rather forward manner with her. She also has an interest in things she doesn't understand.

This is evidenced by her curiosity, which seems quite intense, about what a pooka is.

Even if she doesn't allow her self time to explore it.

 

But here's the thing, Elwood doesn't tell her who Harvey is. He only tells her that he's a

"pooka." His missing friend is a pooka. What the heck is a pooka? If she were introduced

to Harvey, would she have reacted like Aunt Ethel? Again, what we don't know... That seems

to be what Mrs. Chumley's role is in the film.

 

That is a very good point. I wonder if she heads for the dictionary again when she get's

home.

 

I doubt it.

 

Going back to what I said earlier. Mrs. Chumley is responsible.She is "focused" on

something. Elwood is free. He is free to wonder and ponder it all. Maybe it's my own

neurosis, but that has to open you up to as much sadness as it does joy. Well, at least

some sadness.

 

I'm very similar to you with this, so I know of what you speak.

 

Anyhow, I still want to get to Veta and the Judge, among other things. I am learning a

great deal from reading your comments and those of everyone else. This is great people!

 

I've really enjoyed the discussion. It's been very deep.

 

And you know what's next from me...

 

harvey92.jpg

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Hi there Frank,

 

*Ohhh, my goodness, I'm Lyman... without Nurse Kelly!*

 

Haaaa!

 

*Now that killed me! I do admit, I'm on the "Harvey isn't real" side of the aisle.*

 

Well I guess there are two schools of thought out there. ;) Do you feel that Elwood believes Harvey is real in a literal sense. I still can't get past Veta and Dr. Chumley both having dealings with Harvey as well. It's an interesting difference in the way we view the film. I am one of those people who tends to believe in everything no matter how fantastic. It drives my more logical friends nuts because I'm otherwise a pretty logical person myself. I don't have any (real) proof of it but I want to believe.

 

*That was beautiful, and I think it really speaks to the heart of the film. Most of us*

*get caught up in chasing things that we believe will bring us "happiness" and many of us*

*end up losing sight of all the happiness that can be easily found all around us, every*

*day. Sure, some of us are more fortunate than others in certain areas of life, but not all.*

 

Now here we agree. I think that is the heart of the film. I also think that message really attracts people. They want to be reminded of this. People might not hold on to the message but after watching the film, you can't help but do a little self evaluating. It's universally human and very appealing.

 

*My brother has told me about a mentally-challenged man who works with him. This man*

*always lights up whenever he sees my brother and they end up talking about things like*

*older television shows (70s and 80s) and toys. Yes, this man is a boy. I always tell my*

*brother, all I'd ever need to feel good about life is to spend one moment with a person*

*like that. It's also how I feel about young children. Just give me a moment with them, and*

*I will feel better.*

 

I can really understand that. When the great-grandchildren come to visit my mom, it's like all her anxieties and pains melt away. She gets this big smile on her face. I wonder sometimes that after they leave, does a sadness creep in? I feel there is a joy of being in the moment and a melancholy that tries to take hold when the moment has passed. I guess the trick is to try and stay in the moment.

 

When Elwood is in the alley talking to Sanderson and Miss Kelly, he is pondering the past. Indeed, Sanderson encourages this. In the Doctor's view you have to reflect to heal.

 

*That is exactly how I feel about Elwood: the loss of his mother has greatly affected*

*him. And I believe you are correct, I don't think Elwood ever mentions his mother. That's*

*a nice catch.*

 

I think it is telling that Elwood never mention's his mother, yet we get the sense, listening to others; that it was a terrible loss for him. Elwood cannot dwell on it. He must try to stay in the moment. Harvey is there to fill the void.

 

*I do believe Elwood drinks but is no longer a drunk. Although, do we ever seen him take*

*a drink?*

 

This is another interesting aspect to me. I always took Elwood's drinking in stride but I would agree that he isn't necessarily a drunk. I don't think we ever see him take a drink. We do see him reorder though. Also who do you think is drinking Harvey's martinis? :)

 

*I do believe Elwood was a drunk before but Ed Hickey's being "spiffed" woke him*

*up. But I wouldn't disagree with you saying he's still an alcoholic. Can a drunk all of a*

*sudden drink in moderation?*

 

I'm not sure. I would certainly say it's not a common occurrence. AA is founded on the principle that you can't.

 

You brought up some very interesting points with regard to Elwood's drinking and how Harvey fits into all that. I still think social drinking is a "simple pleasure" to Elwood and something in life he enjoys. Taking it too far and being an out and out drunk wouldn't be very pleasant at all. I thought what you and Jackie said about Elwood heading down that road or even already being a drunk, and Harvey picking that time to appear made a lot of sense. Maybe with Harvey looking after him he has struck a balance with his drinking.

 

*Many people judge others on the quick, especially those talking to imaginary "people."*

 

Well you have a point there. :)

 

*I could share one opinion with many different people and they all would quickly process*

*that opinion and make a judgment on me. Is it a final judgment? It all depends.*

 

So you think Aunt Ethel may be ringing up Veta later with questions? Do you think she just needs time to process what has happened and that she might learn to accept Elwood's peculiarity to some degree? I think it is a shock and she has made a quick judgment. I never really thought about what she might do regarding Elwood once she exits.

 

*That's an excellent point, and one I didn't think of. Mrs. Chumley's ignorance is bliss. Her*

*not knowing allows her to remain happy. Interesting.*

 

Well it's a thought. The way she interacts with her husband and her general demeanor have always suggested to me that she is unaware of that side of her husband. I'm not even sure how successful Dr. Chumley is in his philandering.

 

*That's an interesting point, too. Does she actually think her husband is being dismissive of*

*her or does she view that as him being him? That's who he is, so she accepts that. Hmmm...*

 

When Dr. Chumley tells Elwood of his desire to go to Akron and not wanting the woman to talk, just beer and poor thing, well what does that say about him and his relationship to Mrs. Chumley? These are areas of the film that I haven't delved into that deeply but I have always noticed them on a surface level. I was always struck by how pleasant Mrs. Chumley seemed, how in their one scene together, the Doctor somewhat ignores her and takes her car. (Granted he has important things on his mind) and how he fantasizes of Akron, beer, and women who can't talk.

 

*But here's the thing, Elwood doesn't tell her who Harvey is. He only tells her that he's a*

*"pooka." His missing friend is a pooka. What the heck is a pooka? If she were introduced*

*to Harvey, would she have reacted like Aunt Ethel? Again, what we don't know... That seems*

*to be what Mrs. Chumley's role is in the film.*

 

That is a good point. I also like the idea of Mrs. Chumley and what we don't know. Interesting.

 

*And you know what's next from me...*

 

Well this is a whole new can of beans isn't it? Ha! I think that screencap you used is perfect. Veta mentions the word "sex" more than anyone in the film. Maybe she's the only one who does say the word. Veta seems to have definite opinions about it and also some issues with it. I've never seen all that much romantic in her relationship with the Judge though. I'm very interested in your take on this.

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>*It's also how I feel about young children. Just give me a moment with them, and I will feel better.*

 

Frank, are you free for babysitting? I have a pack of kids I'd like to introduce you to that just might change your mind... :D

 

>*I think it is telling that Elwood never mention's his mother, yet we get the sense, listening to others; that it was a terrible loss for him. Elwood cannot dwell on it. He must try to stay in the moment. Harvey is there to fill the void.*

 

I like your take, Molo, of Elwood needing to stay in the moment. Elwood is definitely different than most of us, or the rest of the people in the movie. Most people talk about their troubles at the drop of a hat. Especially in bars.

 

>*So you think Aunt Ethel may be ringing up Veta later with questions? Do you think she just needs time to process what has happened and that she might learn to accept Elwood's peculiarity to some degree? I think it is a shock and she has made a quick judgment. I never really thought about what she might do regarding Elwood once she exits.*

 

Aunt Ethel strikes me as the kind of person who would do one of two things: She would go home and forcibly put it out of her mind forever, maybe occasionally thinking of Elwood, then shoving that thought out of her mind quickly as she busies herself with something else.

 

Or, being a take charge kind of woman, she would not bother with Veta. She would call the best doctors on the east coast immediately to send someone out to take care of it. Only after that would she set foot back in that house. I think she has only been coming over to see Elwood anyway. Without Elwood, her visits are just an obligation.

 

 

>*When Dr. Chumley tells Elwood of his desire to go to Akron and not wanting the woman to talk, just beer and poor thing, well what does that say about him and his relationship to Mrs. Chumley? These are areas of the film that I haven't delved into that deeply but I have always noticed them on a surface level. I was always struck by how pleasant Mrs. Chumley seemed, how in their one scene together, the Doctor somewhat ignores her and takes her car. (Granted he has important things on his mind) and how he fantasizes of Akron, beer, and women who can't talk.*

 

Dr. Chumley has a lot of responsibilities, therefore, he dreams of being taken care of by a woman who can't talk... I am wondering if that is more due to his job as a psychiatrist than his relationship with Mrs. Chumley (who seems remarkably well adjusted). He must listen all day to people talking talking talking...... and though his wife is friendly and outgoing, she is not going to pat him on the head and say, there, there.... poor thing. She probably babbles about her day as he drifts off thinking of the beautiful woman who is there just for him. Unfortunately, they seem like every couple I know. Dr. Chumley is an everyman, beset by responsibilities he doesn't really want, including the responsibility of saying "Uh-huh..." occasionally to his wife.

 

>*Well this is a whole new can of beans isn't it? Ha! I think that screencap you used is perfect. Veta mentions the word "sex" more than anyone in the film. Maybe she's the only one who does say the word. Veta seems to have definite opinions about it and also some issues with it. I've never seen all that much romantic in her relationship with the Judge though. I'm very interested in your take on this.*

 

I think what Veta says is what we all think sometimes.... she is an everyman too. Or everywoman, anyway. I think her comments on sex and the psychological profession are pretty accurate, and they make me guffaw. But as a character, she also has a little small town fear of sex in her too. She is rather repressed, and the word just keeps popping out of her all the time.... I find this to be one of the funniest aspects of Veta and the movie.

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