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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #1 (From The Great Ziegfeld)

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The perspective is extremely bright here. Anna is very light and carefree, showing no problems or worries. Her having a maid shows money which was in scant supply in those days for most of the American public. Essentially we are seeing a facade of the times, something that the public desperately needed in those days. They wanted to see a bright happy future w/love and romance, wealth and prosperity which is what is portrayed onscreen.

Themes I think would be naturally consistent and as the movie musical progressed, they usually followed a similar format. The idea of boy meets girl, boy chases girl, boy loses girl, and boy wins girl back. And especially in this period we see an idea of a wealthier, more cultured man romancing a beautiful girl with a backdrop of gorgeous sets and costumes. 

I think pre-code the song would definitely have been more suggestive, the men most likely would pursue the girl more suggestively, and the lady herself would be clothed more scantily. 

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This clip from The Great Ziegfeld (1937) a very light, happy-go-lucky view of life at time a number of years after the financial crash of 1929 but before the real drama of war in Europe would start in 1939.  It is an overly optimistic view from the perspective of upper class, well-to-do theater patrons giving the viewing audience an escape from their everyday problems and a visual idea of how grand and fun life could be, but most likely not so realistic for the average movie audience.

 

Had this been filmed before the motion picture code was enforced, we most likely would have seen more risqué costumes on stage and as mentioned in our daily lecture, an excuse to see the female performers in various phases of undress within (the excuse of) the dressing room.  The dialog would probably have been peppered with double entendres and more risqué humor. But we will have to wait another 20-30 years before the code is totally abandoned.

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I did last year's course but did not join in the forums,  which I'm hoping to do some of this year. Yay!  

So glad to see this film airing; in the time since I've seen this movie last I've read a gigantic biography of Zeigfeld, and his life with Anna Held (and Billie Burke and others).  There's a lot of his life that wouldn't have been approved for the movie! I agree that had this been made pre-code,  the costuming -especially on stage- would have been different.  And c'mon, she probably would have been a lot less reserved in the dressing room off-stage. 

I also watched Robert Osborne's interview with Louise Rainer at a previous TCM film fest.  She was 100 years old and still amazing!    

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I think I'm too jaded for this film,Held is stunning to look at but is her head full of fluff? Oh I am but a stranger in your country can you help a poor damsel out? I love musicals and if it weren't for William Powell it would not hold my interest. As for pre code films the only one I've seen is Night Nurse with Barbara Stanwyck so I have no clue,as for the uplifting movement of the film I think lighting made her seem like an innocent angel and the song made me want to say no I will not play with you. 

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Upon thinking about this further, one question I think that may be worth discussion is how movies benefitted from the Hays Code.  In the book version of Breakfast At Tiffany’s, the Holly Golightly character was much more salacious.  One wonders whether the movie (yes, released before the repeal of Hays) would have had the same appeal had that salaciousness been translated to the film version, especially with Audrey Hepburn in the lead role.  The same question with Grapes of Wrath - would the movie had been the same had Rose died in childbirth as in the book.

While I know this comment is not unique to musicals, I think it applies to them.  One of the reasons that musicals from nine decades ago are entertaining today is precisely because they have an innocence that the “good old days” are romanticised as having - whether that is true or illusory.  I’d like to hear others’ thoughts.  Please understand however, I am not advocating censorship.  I am glad Hays was repealed.

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1) I think that Held is more naive than a woman would have been in the 1920s - women understood their power with men - they were working toward and had achieved suffrage. She knew what was going on and would, in reality, have played them off each other much more; something that might have been emphasized more pre-code (question 3). Movies during the Depression were a mode of escape for almost all, so depicting a life that many were not able to live - the money, the prestige, etc - was part of that escape mode and would not have been the reality for the vast majority of the country at the time.

2) Musicals of the Depression era were, as mentioned above, a means of escaping. They would be something to inspire hope in the country and a thought that there will be a better time to come. That is one reason 'Somewhere over the Rainbow' quickly became so iconic (as well as the incredible talent of Garland). The hope of something better, a way to escape the problems of everyday life, will be depicted in the musicals to come.

3) Obviously the interactions between the men and women would have been far different pre-code. And as someone already mentioned, the costuming would be much 'less'. In many ways, it would be more 'realistic' concerning the relationships between men and women. Films during the time of the strict code regulations gave people a 'false' sense of what was really happening in America concerning relationships.

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From watching the Ziegfeld clip, we can expect the spark of love to be a recurring theme in musicals.  Anna Held's mirror was an ingenious theatrical device.  It broke the fourth wall and involved the audience in the flashes of seduction as an illusion.  Suddenly we are all involved in the darting eye contact between Anna, Billings and Ziegfeld, the eternal triangle.  We are made participants in the pursuit and the pursuer.  Pre-code films may have shortened the skirts, intensified the seductive dancing with tap or jazz, but nothing could have worked better than the contrasting elegance of an Edwardian hourglass female figure flashing mirrored signals to hundreds of potential lovers.  Sometimes covering up is far more suggestive than exposing flesh. 

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16 hours ago, BlueMoods said:

Within the TCM course? I don't see anything that says Daily Dose.

 

In Canvas open Mad About Musicals course. Click on Modules. Click on 6/4 - An Historical Overview. Click on Week 1: Monday. Under Table of Contents, scroll down (quite a way down) to Daily Dose. Go down to the blue bar that says Launch External Tool. It will open a new screen where you can play the film clip.

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1.    Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic? Why or why not? 

I do believe that this clip focuses on the brighter side of 1930's life.  The people featured are obviously well off, with jobs and cash to throw around.  Most, if not all, of the audience members would have been, or know someone, struggling with unemployment or under employment, food shortages, etc.  The fantasy the movie portrayed was a way of helping audiences escape reality.

2.    What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression era musicals?

I think other movies of this era would want to focus on the accumulation of wealth, either from working hard or marrying right. The idea of the self-made man/woman getting to the top by his/her wits and charm alone.

3.    Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced, how might you imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code? Give specific examples.

Pre-code movies would more than likely have the gentlemen arrive backstage to present their tokens the young lady in person.  Instead of sly winks and nods between the rivals, I believe that the language would have been stronger.  Their posturing more physical.  She would have been in a thin dressing gown, or behind a screen with bare shoulders visible.  There would probably have also been show girls in various stages of undress lingering backstage between numbers.

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1. Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic? Why or why not?   

I do believe it is showing a brighter, cheerful, more optimistic view of the world instead of what is going on during real time at that moment. The film is offering an escape from problems/everyday life at that time, an escape that only costs pennies as opposed to what was needed to actually afford such luxuries in that day and age. Movie patrons could leave their worry filled lives and be transported to Hollywood or New York (or wherever the scene takes place), escaping the Depression (loss of income, loss of livelihoods, having to struggle for things which were easy at one time) raging on outside.  it's one reason we go to the movies no matter the year.  We go to relax and escape, be entertained by the story or type of move genre it is, while we traipse about with each actor through their adventure and/or struggle. 

 

2. What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression era musicals? 

The musicals during this period seem to use lavish sets and scenery to distract from the outside world. Also seen in these musicals tend to be struggles but more of the light, care free romantic type.  The romantic stories/settings portrayed are like fairy tales, with a romantic hero who wins the heart of the soft, very feminine, doe eyed, coquettish woman.  This combine with light and happy songs to whisk the everyday patron away from whatever reality they are facing.  There also seems to be no shortage of money which again contrasts with the economic crisis going on at that time.  I would venture that the themes which are forthcoming might be more romantic flamboyant stories to lighten the mood of the current situation, complete with songs to lift the movie goers spirit or heart.  Either that, or adventure filled movies with bigger than life heroes to take on whatever might come their way.  Both offer an escape from reality.

 

3. Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced, how might you imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code? Give specific examples.

If this had been pre-code, I think we would have seen the performer, Anne Held (Louise Rainer) dressed in a more scantily clad outfit on stage. Instead she was covered up with only the fit of the garment hinting at the curves hidden underneath.  What she performed might have been more risque and suggestive, instead of the mild flirtation she did with the mirror.  In the dressing room we more than likely would have seen her actually changing, instead of the hint that she was about to change (her stylist unbuttoning moving as if to unbutton her outfit).  They might have also had one of the men blunder into her dressing room, only to walk in on her and ogle her as she changed. The clips shown in today's lecture video (Broadway Melody 1929) highlight the contrast with a movie made after code (The Great Ziegfeld) rather nicely.

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In as much as most of the musicals of this era are lighthearted and frivolous - which is why I like them and find them so re-watchable - The Great Ziegfeld is no exception.  Musicals have never really been grounded in reality. The depression is nowhere to be seen nor is anyone looking for it.  With all due respect to Damien Chazelle (sorry to be getting way ahead of myself), I like knowing the lead characters will succumb to a happy ending - fall in love AND make it to Broadway/Hollywood.  

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The clip (and of course, most of the movie - with the exception of Fanny Brice's "My Man" number) does indeed portray that "brighter perspective" that you talk about.  Much of the movie is pure nostalgic escapism - I also venture to say that it is elevated nostalgic escapism.  I guess what I mean by that is the subject matter itself deals very little with the common, everyday person.  Specific to the clip: look at the sets and costumes (not a blemish, very regal, clean, and luxuriant) and even the props (look at that flower arrangement!) and the song they chose to feature is also very light-hearted, sweet, kind of purposefully bumbling which is very endearing.  It's also in the acting style.  The two leads of the clip (Powell and Rainer) take on a very "devil-may-care" approach to their lines.  The only one who seems to exhibit any kind of anxiety at all is Billings (Frank Morgan) and even he gives it a comic, light-hearted touch.

I think that same light-hearted touch is pretty much a standard used in most of the musicals of the time period.  Certainly, because this is Hollywood, the glamour is something you see in practically every movie musical of the era.

Pre-Code, I'm sure the suggestiveness of the musical number would be amped up a bit.  The costume would probably have shown more leg or chest, the performance would have a lot of sex appeal, at least in a "nudge-nudge, wink-wink" kind of way.  Not to mention the dressing room scene would probably have actually featured her undressing.

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1.    Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic? Why or why not? 

I agree there are many aspects in this clip that show the "brighter perspective of life," than what was happening.  One example is the fact that they are at the theatre.  I imagine that even those who were frequently at the theatre during the prime of the economy likely had to cut back on entertainment during the depression.  Or, if they were going, it was merely to try and "save face," even though their bank accounts couldn't afford it.   Similarly, they are all dressed to the 9s with tuxes, fancy dresses, etc.  I'm sure the upper class still had many of their clothes available to them, but it would be much harder to keep up with the fashion without much of a budget.   Another example is the content of the song.  Held repeatedly asks for someone to come "play with [her,]" making life seem easy and care free, when the reality was many people waiting in lines to find work for the day, or in soup-lines to get fed.  Who actually had time to go and play?  Lastly, the tip Ziegfeld gives the door man is "5 pounds."  In today's currency, that would be $72 (thank you dollartimes.com for the conversion).  I don't know many people who would tip that much NOW, let alone when money was hard to come by.  It only further portrays how movies decided to forget about reality, and live through the fantasies of yester-year or in hopes of a better future.

2.    What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression era musicals?

I would anticipate most of the Depression era musicals would keep with this "money is of no concern" feeling and live life to the fullest.  I suspect one would go to the movies and see top hats and tails escorting jewel covered girls around a dance floor with champagne, and a fine dinner. 

3.    Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced, how might you imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code? Give specific examples.

Knowing that burlesque was very big in the 20s, I would imagine Held would be presenting her "Come Play With Me" song in a MUCH different manner than what is scene.  In the clip, she is dressed as if going to a fancy horse race, with light colors, lace, and covered from head to toe, saying "come play with me" in a very naive manner.  Pre-Code I imagine would have her being quite suggestive in what "come play with me" meant, with a burlesque, strip-tease feel, slowly revealing bits and pieces of dark lace, strategically placed on her body.  The dressing room scene would likely continue this concept with her returning in little to nothing, and either changing into something new, or slowly covering up.

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1. This movie definitely shows a brighter side of life considering the times. The average person wouldn’t have been dressed in that manner, nor would they have had the money to go to a show like that. The average person would also not have 5 pounds to give away like that.

2. I imagine that most depression era musicals would be in the same vein. I was just watching Auntie Mame this morning, and while not a musical, it also shows a lighter side of the depression in that Auntie Mame seemed to have no trouble finding a job even if she couldn’t keep it, and Beau kept a taxi meter running.

3. If this movie had been pre-code the actress onstage would have been more scantily clad, and backstage even more so.

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As with many of the depression-era musicals, the portrayal of life is dreamy and carefree. Anna Held seems to float through her daily performance and back-stage business as if there were no problems for her concerns. If you consider that people during that time period were jobless, hungry, and homeless, it is strange to see a lady being blasé about very expensive flowers in her dressing room and the fact that producers are lining up to offer her jobs.

The music in this clip is so light and joyous. It is such a contradiction to the sadness that was actually happening throughout the world. It was probably a wonderful distraction to the woes the audience members were experiencing, but watching and listening to it now is almost surreal to me. I have to watch the entire film to see if I still feel that way.

 

 

 

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1.  Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic? Why or why not? 

     Yes, I think it does give a brighter perspective, considering the Depression era has not ended just yet. The reason for this I think is because M-G-M specialized, better than nearly all other studios, in helping audiences forget their present troubles and enjoy a more glamorous side of life filled with beautiful women like Louise Rainer who exuded the utmost class and handsome, dashing men like William Powell who had a genius for clever repartee (i.e., his response to the doorman in front of the theater after giving him £5 - “yes, I’m trying to lose some weight”). Audiences certainly needed this kind of glamour and humor during the Depression as it bouyed their spirits in the face of considerable financial strain.

 

2.  What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression era musicals?

     One approach is one with the leading lady being more drawn to the idea of two men vying for her attention. Anna’s initial response to Ziegfeld is one of ignorance, assuming he’s a child simply because of the suffix at the end of his name. I was somewhat relieved that the beauty of the roses he sent her encouraged her to change her mind and see both men after all. It brings to mind all the romanticized concepts several different musicals from this era were known for, particularly the ones from M-G-M.

 

3.  Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced, how might you imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code? Give specific examples.

     One thing that would more than likely have been different would be Louise Rainer’s costume; it would probably have been more revealing, possibly one that would accentuate her bosom and maybe off the shoulder. Also, her maid would probably not have been European, but a Black maid or someone from Brooklyn or the Bronx, like a Thelma Ritter-type character actress with a penchant for making sarcastic wisecracks and maybe even be a little irreverent towards Rainer’s character.

 

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  1. Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic? Why or why not?

Absolutely. This film was made and released during the Great Depression -- a piece depicting "real life" would not hold great appeal for audiences who were wrestling with financial hardships and the repercussions of such. The movies, as a rule, provided a few hours of escape for people, showing plots and situations through rose-colored glasses. The world of entertainment is often (and stereotypically) seen as being glamorous -- and this film maintains that position. The women are beautiful; the men are charming; and both are impeccably dressed. The technical aspects of the movie contribute to this bright side of life as well: light incidental music; soft camera focus; attention to detail. 

2. What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

Money = power; forget-your-troubles; women having to choose between career and love; hope and optimism.

3. Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced; how might yuo imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code? Give specific examples.

• I believe Flo Ziegfeld wanted to model his Follies after the Follies- Bergere , which featured quite a different -- and more risque -- form of performance than the one Anna Held gave in the film. The double entendres in the song lyrics would have been emphasized; her costume would have shown a lot more skin; the audience would have been rowdier; and there's a good chance she would have been joined on stage by some scantily-clad showgirls.

• Anna might have been less coquette and more minx when faced with Ziegfeld's overture -- which might have been more overt than a bouquet of pricey, exotic orchids.

• The competition between Ziegfeld and Billings might not have been just reserved to a simple glare across theatre boxes -- there might have been more physical action and coarser language in this segment.

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1.    Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic? Why or why not? 

Yes, I agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective.  During the depression I doubt that most people were going to the theatre or dropping 5 pound notes to the doorman.

2.    What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression era musicals?

I believe the theme might be about power.  Who has it, how can they keep it.

3.    Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced, how might you imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code? Give specific examples.

This one is a tough one. I'm not sure.

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1. As with most Depression Era Musicals or movies, they were made to lift everyone's spirits so for an hour or so they could be entertained and not think of their reality, and enjoy a finer and lighter life even though it was on screen. Both my parents, born in 1917, lived through the Depression.

2. The flirtation of women to men to get what they want is a theme that plays throughout most of the Depression Era musicals and movies; and well into the 1940's. Usually the talented young waif comes from a poor family, out of town somewhere in ole USA, just dying to make it big in NYC. She meets a nice young guy, (or a scoundrel, no wait, that's the 40s) that introduces her to the guy running the show, he gives her a break, she's either in the chorus or an understudy, and ends up a star. We fade out thinking she'll be a star forever, or she'll marry the nice young guy, have kids, picket fence and live happily after ever. 

3. If this were pre-code, we'd have more back-stage scenes with low-cut tops, although smaller breasts than the 50's, undies as in short "bloomers, camisoles, etc. stockings, heels. More kissing near couches or, OMG beds. Images or scenes that led us to believe (always implied, which is sexier sometimes), that unmarried men and women may have spent the night together, or even have lived together. None of that after 1934!

Note: Even though Louise Rainier is fantastic, the overacting of this era is almost comedic. Also, William Powell in my eyes, can do no wrong no matter what character he plays! 

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These escapist and softening features of musicals and almost all Hollywood cinema of this period continued through the 1960s when Italian neorealism and the French Novelle Vague would influence Hollywood filmmakers to break the tradition of classical narrative and pursue more complicated and heavy themes. That is why after the 60's the musicals lose popularity and also become. But escapism will always be inherent in this genre, as la la land recently proved.

 

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Utterly gorgeous, pure escapism!

Light-hearted, but with a heart of gold, look at the lives of the wealthy who can afford to drop pound-notes or dollars, purchasing frivolities like flowers..

Ms. Rainer captures the innocence of the pot-code era, but, had this been filmed before, the costumes would have been more daring, more flesh would have been on view in the dressing room and the lilting song would have been played a little more risque...

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1.  Do you agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic?  Why or why not?

I do agree that the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might be realistic.  When you are in the midst of the Depression, why on Earth would you want to go see a movie that is realistic.  People largely went to the movies then, and now, to escape.  We want to feel better, to be happy.  If a movie can divert us from our problems for even a brief period of time, that is wonderful!!  In addition, per my understanding, the movie generally white-washed Ziegfield's womanizing.  To have focused on that would have entirely changed the tone of the movie and taken away from the fact that Ziegfield was the showman that he was.  Finally, I think that one of the most interesting parts of the clip from "The Great Zigfield" is when Ziegfield slips the man outside 5 pounds, a great amount of money at that time, for information.  This only underscores Ziegfield's wealth.  The incorporation of the joke (to paraphrase, "Why did you give me 5 pounds, Sir? Z:  Because I wanted to lose some weight.") makes light of what might have triggered an intense audience reaction.  How many people would have given their eye teeth for 5 pounds at that time to have food on the table.  It seems a bit frivolous to pay someone that much just for information about an actress -- thus, the necessity for the interjection of humor.

2.  What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression era musicals?

Two-three recurrent themes are male competition, the idea that an attractive female has to choose between 2 suitors, and the fact that she often makes that choice based upon what the male can offer her.  Again, the fact that these themes are present in the musicals is not a surprise given the cultural norms of the day.

3.  Since this is a musical that was made after the motion picture code was enforced, how might you imagine it might have been filmed or scripted differently if it had been pre-code?  Give specific examples.

First, when the man outside the theater is describing the actress, he mentions that she has "eyes the size of walnuts."  I wonder how many men when describing an attractive woman would first mention her eyes as the most appealing of her attributes.  Second, when Louise Rainer is singing the provocative lyrics, "I wish you'd come and play with me," the music is very light-hearted and playful.  She is coquettish and demure as she playfully shines the mirror into Ziegfield's eyes as she suggests that he come and play with her.  A pre-code script of this scene may have Louise more scantily clad with dramatic pause after that line leaving no doubt to what she really meant.

4.  I was intrigued by the Lecture Video on Broadway Melody of 1929 about Dr. Avant's mention of the leit motiv used throughout the musical.  Could one of the reasons it was used be a reflection of, perhaps, his possible earlier training in music?  That is, if he grew up listening to the great composers of the preceding generation, such as Richard Wagner, who introduced the leit motiv, would it be natural for him to turn there?  Using leit motiv, or a repeated melody, is a great way to introduce characters and keep the audience, who was experiencing the new sensory experience of sound in this genre for the first time (speaking of Broadway Melody of 1929), grounded.

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Having not seen the entire movie, it is difficult to say if the “brightening” of the times carries on throughout, but this clip is certainly a bright time for Anna Held.  She’s courted by two men, given a tremendous opportunity, and performs in lavish theaters for audiences dressed in their finest.  If I were in the depression era audience, I would definitely see this as happier times  In Real Life (IRL) she did become a millionaire so maybe a contemporary audience would know that going into the theater and this would just be background info on Ziegfeld's love life.  And adjusting for inflation, that 5-pound note would get about $450 US today.  How aspirational (if not outlandish) that must have been for someone in the mid 30’s. 

I was also struck by the use of the doorman to give the pivotal piece of information to Ziegfeld.  A sort of finger in the eye of the bigwigs, letting them know that you don’t do this alone.  The working man is important to you in these times of hardship.  But fears allayed, the bigwig compensates the working man, and all is right with the world. 

Also, interesting that Anna uses the mirror trick to stir up the audience.  I’ve seen something similar portrayed that was used in a dark theater to catch couples making out in the back. My understanding is that IRL her performances leaned a bit more toward burlesque with naughty songs and showing more skin. Perhaps with code constraints impinging on a more realistic depiction of her performances and the type of audience that might have been there, the mirror trick lost some meaning.

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