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Daily dose #2

 

Before I start answering the questions, I have one.  Does anyone else think Max Showalter could have replaced Nelson Eddy for better acting and just have him lipsync?

 

 

  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

in the canoe scene, Jeanette is very self assured and hardly takes notice of poor Nelson.  Then after he sings she makes fun of him.  She is very comfortable in the scene.

Nelson to me comes off stiff.  Even when lip syncing, he holds himself very ****, as if he needed to be bellowing the song loud enough for the back row to hear.  

Notice in this scene how many times the editor cuts to Jeanette instead of Nelson when he is singing.  

In the saloon scene, she is acting nervous, her operatic voice so out of place.  Nelson comes in and she really is ashamed, while he takes notice, but does not interact.  

Speaking as someone who has directing and editing experience, I find it interesting in the choice of shots.  The director shies away from close-ups of Nelson, having him in medium and group shots as oppose to the shot choices for Jeanette.

 

  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

Jeanette is a pretty actress with limited vocal skills.  By limited, she seems to have to sing everything operatic.  This may be why MGM didn't stick with Deanna Durbin.  They already had a soprano, and Judy Garland had more range (and was a favorite of Arthur Freed).  She does well with other actors other than Nelson.  Clark Gable in "San Francisco" and Maurice Chevalier in "The Love Parade" for example.  As an actress, she is capable, but she's no Hepburn (Katherine or Audrey).

As for poor Nelson (and their relationship was parodied by Jerry Herman in the song "Nelson" from his show

"A Day in Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine" and in "Jerry's Girls".  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vG76dD4jX8w for an example of this)

 

Alas, what can you say about Nelson.  Although I have seen a few of the Nelson/Jeanette films, the only other film I can remember him in is a cartoon - "Willie the Operatic Whale"  aka "The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met" by Disney.  Which sadly was Nelson at his most animated.  Looking at IMDB, it appears after 1950 Nelson was no longer making films, but appearing as himself on TV shows.  

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

While you still have the sass mouth dames, they are no longer the leading lady. Instead, the small miss will never succeed without the big strong tenor.  Just wait a few decades.  Then The Soprano's will take over.  at least on TV.

Sadly, under the film code, Good MUST triumph over evil. No bad deed goes unpunished (apparently the theft done by Mr. Potter in "It's a Wonderful Life" is an exception). And bad girls cannot get the man in the end.  

 

 

Nelson and Jeanette_.jpg

Maxshowalter_.jpg

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The films during this era, showed and taught audiences, the ways to behave around each other. In the past, courting was so strict and flirting was frowned upon, but now we see ladies being more independent and speaking their minds. In the first clip of Rose Marie, Macdonald mocks Eddy's song and she had no problem talking about another man. In the second clip, Macdonald was making her own money by singing, she was again showing independence. Macdonald still liked Eddy, but she wasn't going to be the type of woman who hung off his arm. But in keeping with the Hollywood code, Macdonald dressed more conservative, and her quiet glee at Eddy's song was also an indication of being proper and behaved. 

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I confess, this was my very first time seeing these two actors perform together and by golly I liked it. I want to see more so now I plan to find some of their films together because I loved their screen chemistry. I loved seeing how comfortable and playful they seem together in those two scenes. I looked up Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald so I could learn more about them and it seems they had a brief romance while filming Rose Marie (1936). Their onscreen chemistry came across as something you don't seen too often in films. They seemed relaxed and at ease with one another and had a connection that I wouldn't be surprised if it grew deeper offscreen. 

The relationships that were depicted seem to be clearly defined. There was a refined lady, a gentlemen who can be cad at times, and the overtly sexualized bar girl who thrusts herself into a round of applause. I noticed the men could have a duality to their personalities but the women were either ladylike or a party girl. She couldn't be both and I wonder why. 

 

 

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If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them: For me, it was an instant recognition of Jeanette MacDonald - of course, her amazing beauty, but the voice that was legend:

"Jeanette was a very talented operatic singer/lyrical soprano, with a wide vocal range, E above high C, close to 3 octaves.(IMDb - Jeanette MacDonald; Biography, Donavan Webber)"

Whenever I hear her sing, I am awestruck at her range, yet also reminded of the many cartoons we watched when a character would sing and glass somewhere would shatter - and, I often now wonder if the voice of Ms. MacDonald is/was used for those... :)

No matter where you are in your home, if a film comes on with Jeanette MacDonald in it, I find it instantly recognizable - some of my favorites from film are: San Francisco, Maytime, & Three Daring Daughters. Then, from TV, imagine my surprise to hear JM doing "Indian Love Call" on an episode of California's Gold with Huell Howser while he visited Yosemite for the "fire fall" at Yosemite Falls! AMAZING!

 

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Their interactions are flirtatious but not over the top. You can see and feel the chemistry between the two characters - their facial expressions, rather than their actions, show their humor, annoyance, flirtation, etc. They like each other but they are holding themselves back from that.

There seems to be a lot of 'wanting from afar' in their romance. The studio seems to want the audience to be aware of the love interest but they want it to be a wholesome, slow moving romance. In the clips you never see the two actors touch, either. They may be sitting closely in the boat together but they never touch - everything they're feeling is conveyed via their faces and body language. 

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1. What I noticed about the characters in these two scenes...

    clip #1:   The two characters are affected by each other but prefer to hide it from the other.  In this clip she is faced away from him so you can see her face but her words don’t reflect her feelings. She is obviously trying to keep him at a distance while finding him appealing. He is pursuing but holding back as reflected in being caught using his song as some sort of “form letter” he puts different women’s name into like a pick up line.  They are interested but holding back for their own reasons/agenda.  

    Clip #2:   This time the characters are put in a vulnerable position. She trying to earn money and clearly out of her element, getting coaching from the piano player. She is also embarrassed he is seeing her doing this and not well. He embarrassed for her in her position. They avoid eye contact while clearly being drawn to the other.

2. Do not remember seeing these actors previously. The clips makes me curious and I want to see the film.

3. What do these clips say about male/female relationships as depicted in the films of this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

     The relationships of male/female characters are hands off. The double entendres and word play as well as facial expressions are meant to tell the story more than physical contact.  The relationships are more puritanical or expected to be. The norms expected are a lightness to the relationships, more innocent in nature. Girls should be wholesome. Bad girls are vulger, crude and morally bad characters. Hands off, not as much physical touching. Lots of cheek to cheek.

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I've never cared for their type of singing, when I was a kid my sister and I wouldn't watch them. Now that I am much older I do believe I have given them the chance to grow on me. I can sit through the singing especially hers without turning the channel I do like his voice much better. I see the flirtatious way of him in the canoe and her trying not to show anything but indifference towards him but when he sings she loses it.

The saloon scene is showing a girl out of her element and doing what she has to to survive. She watches the old gal who knows what it takes and when she tries it her way she finds herself embarrassed but I don't think it's because she's prudish I think it's because she just looks like a utter buffoon alongside the hardcore expert of the saloon. When he sees her it's perhaps shock at first then you see his eyes soften and you get he sense that he sees her and what guts she has to go ahead and try and this only makes him more attracted to the young woman.

I enjoy their movies now, it's like watching instead of reading the old Harlequin romance novels way back when, boy meets girl they don't like each other, but you know they will end up together and you just can't put the book down because you want to see them make it, fall in love and be happy. I can only imagine their movies were that book during the depression, you walk in to a theatre spending that hard found change, you need to escape the harsh reality of your day if only for a few hours. You settle in and get comfy, you might have even purchased popcorn and there you sit. When the lights dim and the reel starts to chatter it goes black then boom there it is those two singing love birds that you know will get together but this time you wonder what and how it will happen. You become immersed in the flicker of the films light you slide down in your seat, take a deep breath and your there with them cheering them on and you forget what waits outside for you, if only for a little while.    

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1) The interaction between the characters Sergeant Bruce and Marie is coquettish yet reserved. The form in which they talk in the canoe shows they are interested in each other. When Bruce tells Marie she has romance around her and she says, "not quite" with a disappointment in her face. He smirks and tells her to look around as if he's what she is missing in order to complete the romantic evening. He asks Marie what the other man is like so he can know who he has to compete with. She looks uninterested in Bruce because she doesn't look at him again. She shrugs off his question, possibly thinking Bruce is just being annoying or nosy. Once he starts singing her face lights up as he describes her in song. When he sings that she has a "devil in her eye" Marie rubs her hands, raises her eyebrows and sort of nods as if to agree and imply she can fall in love with him and spend a romantic night together. She keeps her back facing him to hide her surprise and thrill of having Bruce interested in her. 

In the saloon scene Marie unexpectedly notices Sergeant Bruce walk in and she turns her back on him as she continues to sing but doesn't want to make eye contact with him. She seems to imply that she does not want him to know she is singing for money that perhaps she is making herself look ridiculous in front of him and the other guests who don't pay attention to her performance. Bruce simply looks at her and smiles when one of the saloon girls steals her spotlight and Marie bites her nail and tries to mimic the other woman's big dance moves that include hip jerking and breast touching. Marie sees she can't compete with the tight-dressed wiggler and the embarrassment shows on her face. She catches Bruce smiling at her and feels even more embarrassed because she was not able to seduce the crowd like the other woman, which also seems to me like she didn't win the performing battle like Bruce had won the singing battle in the previous scene.

2) I have not seen Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald in previous films or shows. I did however research their list of work and they were paired again in other films. It seems as if they were the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers of musical films, but more romantic with perhaps more sexual implications based on the movie titles I found.

3) The clips during this era suggest female and male roles were capable of falling in love and competing for the other's affection even if it made one look silly or ridiculous. The idea I got from these clips is that men appear to be more open about their feelings toward a woman than vice versa. Also, the female characters (at least Marie) tried not to act interested in Bruce even though you can see it on her face. Females are portrayed to be more reserved and "playing hard to get" when it comes to a man flirting with her or trying to show his interest in her. The male character is more dominant and secure, and the female is reserved - which is something I expect was under the Hollywood Film Code. A woman could not be too seductive or show too much skin whereas a man could only imply his fantasies but not act upon them.

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1. The interaction between MacDonald and Eddy seemed comedic banter, the 1st clip shows the loving banter between the two actors, the 2nd clip showed how moved Eddy seemed towards MacDonald while she was attempting to sing to a barroom crowd. 

2. I have not seen these two actors before or any of their movies.

3. The Male/Female interaction seems to be downplayed, no real physical contact (like the passionate embrace of one another), what I expected as far as the Hollywood Film Code is that there are no women dressed in scantly outfits.

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1. The first was a total surprise to me - my impression of those two was always based on that clip of their famous duet which did nothing for me. They were like cardboard characters. This clip shows us an utterly charming guy hinting at a guy comfortable in his own skin while McDonald comes off as smart, sexy woman who acts like she’s in control but the scene hints things are going to change in their dynamic. It was kind of sweet and funny. 

The next scene shows us what was hinted in the first clip. She’s exposed as an ingenue and he’s embarrassed for her and wants to protect her from her humiliation at being out of her element and really out of touch with more carnal world she’s obviously been sheltered from.  Good stuff  good start for romantic film.

2. Never saw them except for afore-mentioned clip.

3. More of a clean more innocent approach to male-female relationship but does hint there’s something more there.

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1. There is a natural chemistry between them. They are both comfortable acting together and the viewer senses this. They parry like a good comedic team. One plays the pitcher and the other the catcher then it reverses. 

Take for example their playful banter in the canoe. With Eddy singing the song first to Rose Marie but than changing it to Caroline with MacDonald quickly reminding him her name is Rose Marie. Than she mimics him singing various names in place of hers quipping it is all rather convenient. Then Eddy teases back that the name change did not work with Maude. In fact, nothing worked with Maude intimating that he didn't get to first base with Maude. Macdonald just rolls her eyes.

In the second scene Eddy is mostly silent acting alone with facial expressions. Yet, he still conveys his empathy for MacDonald who is trying to engage her much distracted rough and tumble audience. One can't help but feel sorry for her as she so beautifully acts out the scene, trying desperately to sing in a style and cadence unnatural for her voice and talent. When the second singer gets up and sings in a bawdy manner, shimmying to win over the crowd it is heartbreaking to watch MacDonald trying to imitate her. Eddy feels it too as can be seen in his eyes. Even physically separated without dialogue the two are emotionally connected which connects them emotionally with the audience.

2. I can't say I recall seeing either of them on television shows. I did see Eddy in the 1943 version of "The Phantom of the Opera" but that really wasn't much of a boy chases girl love story film. More like boy helps save girl who then becomes a career woman. 

I saw MacDonald in a few other musicals without Eddy, the one I remember best was, "Three Daring Daughters," with José Iturbi as her love intetest. Sorry to any José Iturbi fans, he was a great pianist and musician but romance just wasn't his schtick

Male/female relationships in film varied at this time. Most were of the sort where a woman needed a man to protect her and take care of her but some showcased women as capable of being independent and able to run their own lives. But even these usually ended with the career woman admitting her dependence on the male sex and finding true happiness in traditional marriage. 

3. Marriage, platonic love, wholesome speech and mannerisms.  Proper courtships. Virginity. Faith, patriotism, high morals and the intact family. Men as the breadwinners, women as the dutiful housewives. Cute children with loving parents. Widows/widowers but no divorce. Criminals, if depicted, must pay the price for their crimes. No dark themes only sunny, optimistic storytelling with an upbeat ending.

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On 6/4/2018 at 9:51 PM, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:

Hi again. 

I am thrilled with the activity surrounding the first Daily Dose of Delight. Here is the forum for Tuesday's.

 

Recall that you watched two clips from Rose Marie and were directed toward the performances of Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald. Look at the three questions below, as I listed them below the clip on Canvas, and post your thoughts. 

I look forward to reading your responses. Remember, this Daily Dose is a Star Studies perspective.

 

Here are a few discussion starters (though feel free to come up with your own):

  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.
  2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.
  3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

 

See you on TCM.

Vanessa

1.  The interaction in the first scene is about "the courtship".  Nelson Eddy being the perfect gentleman trying to impress Jeannette McDonald.  Both playful and humoring one another in a suggestive way.   The boat and just the two of them makes for a romantic setting.  The second scene Nelson Eddy walks in with two ladies by his side, within a crowd while he sees Jeannette singing.  One of the ladies is dressed very risque and her movements which Jeannette mimics as to point out her contempt and dislike without saying anything.  it could only be for good/bad contrast of how a woman is depicted.  The gentleman that he is, walks out of the room to go after her.

2.  Never have seen them in film/TV but have heard their names before.  I may have seen "The Merry Widow".

3.  Mostly that men did the pursuing, and the women played hard to get.  Women shouldn't outwardly be sexually suggestive or speak profanities. 

 

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  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.  The most basic disernable interaction is that both pay full attention to the singing of the other.  It does speak of romantic tension between the two of them. 
  2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.  I have not seen other movies with them
  3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code? With the use of operatic voices, the film raises bar to what was known at the time as "long hair" music. The use of operatically trained voices added a level of education and social elevation.  Just as in the "Jazz Singer" pop music styles were considered low brow as opposed to music of the synagog, or cantorship. The raised level of music is equivilent to more gentile relationship of the male and female.

 

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Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald were an extremely popular movie duo. They made eight pictures together, and later they did some recording, radio, and television together. Of their eight, I’ve seen Naughty MariettaRose-Marie, and Maytime. I cannot remember having seen any other of Eddy’s films, but I have listened to several of his recordings, and in particular I love his work with Jo Stafford. I’ve seen and enjoyed MacDonald’s The Merry Widow with Maurice Chevalier, and San Francisco with Clark Gable. I have heard a few of her recordings as well. It is all utterly lovely. 

I always have the impression that for Eddy it is all about the music. The acting seems to be for him simply a vehicle to get to the next song. MacDonald, too, clearly a profound operatic talent, seems much more comfortable, more natural, with the non-singing parts of her film roles. Both were very professional and took pride in their work, and both maintained touring and recording careers while working in pictures. Eddy was actually one of the first crossover singers, able to entertain a group of teens with popular music just as well as he was able to move an audience with opera in his rich baritone. MacDonald was really only interested in regaining her opera career after she stopped making films. Both Eddy and MacDonald were role models for singers and actors who came after them.

The canoe scene from Rose-Marie is a good example of the differing comfort level between Eddy and MacDonald. As Bruce, Eddy is stiff and stilted in his performance but comes alive when he begins to sing. MacDonald’s posturing and actions as Rose-Marie are much more casual, playful, relaxed. Rose-Marie is in control of the scene, and of Bruce, but she plays it cool, acts as though it doesn’t really bother her that Bruce’s song could be styled for any woman. She seems satisfied with herself that she confronted Bruce with this fact, and though he plays along with her, trying to match her wit, he must admit that neither the song nor he could work with Maude. If a winner over this exchange were to be declared, it surely would be Rose-Marie.

But score a point for the other side with the bar scene. Rose-Marie is completely out of her element. She does try to find the right way to perform in that environment, but she lacks the background for the surroundings, the clientele, and even the song. She’s miserable. And Bruce is surprised and embarrassed at finding her there. To her credit, Rose-Marie does try to follow the (Gilda Gray) shimmy, but it’s too coarse for her, and she must flee. Rose-Marie is no longer self-assured as she was in the canoe, no longer the dominate partner in the relationship.

The contrast of these two scenes goes a long way to demonstrating the prevailing male/female interplay of films in this period. Men are expected to dominate, to lead women in all matters, especially in matters of love. Though women might flirt, even vamp, their attempts at exerting their wants or ideas are momentary and are always reigned in in deference to men. This attitude is expressed beautifully in Gold Diggers of 1933 when Joan Blondell sings that “a woman’s got to have a man” (“Remember My Forgotten Man”) in order for a woman to have a home, a life, a future, a sense of purpose. It is expressed as a need rather than a want, and that makes all the difference. 

 

 

 

 

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What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples. In the first clip, his singing is the mainstay of his courting her. He is expressing himself through his words to her. She seems nonchalant about his attempts of courting. Though she is really enjoying his attempt as well. In the second clip she was trying to avoid seeing him, but he was entranced with her, to the point of shushing the lady who sat with him at the table.

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them. No I have never seen them before this clip.

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code? The lovemaking was done through song in the canoe, and in the second when she tried to copy the other ladies dance but failed. When she realized that her wooing wasn't having an effect or so she thought, the male lead went out to rescue her.

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1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes?

In the first clip, the characters seem to be quite playful in their interactions with the sense of flirtation that's being presented in the scene. The subtle humor and cheeky banter indicate that although on the surface they may seem ambivalent towards one another in reality, they're simply masking their true feelings for each other. Plus the fact that Nelson Eddy's character sort toys with Jeanette MacDonald's character by dropping that line about how he used his love song to woo other woman and couldn't get it past one of them indicates that he's starting to feel comfortable enough around her to slightly push the boundaries of his ribbing.

In the second clip, the intensity of their relationship is put to the test when Nelson Eddy's character conveniently shows up at the Saloon where Jeanette MacDonald's just happens to be working and clearly isn't doing too well at it either. While the character of Sergeant Bruce displays the fact that he can be a lady's man, he looks on to see Rose Marie painfully struggling to perform her classical rendition of the Sophie Tucker's "Some of These Days" to a less than enthusiastic crowd. When she finally notices him, her already mortifying discomfort transitions to utter shock and sheer embarrassment. Yet, she keeps pushing on like a trooper even though she's clearly dying up there. To make matters worse, when the bar maid comes up to take over and give the number a little more pep, it's more than apparent that she doesn't fit in but like any good trooper, she's still keeps pushing on to prove that she can be just as good as the rest of them. This in turn, causes her to win the admiration (and some what pity) of Sergeant Bruce for her audacity to keep on going despite being in an uncomfortable situation.

 

2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

Honestly, I've never really seen either one of these actors, (even though I've heard of Jeanette MacDonald), but they both seem to be quite gifted and talented performers. And, their singing voices are simply incredible to listen to. They just mesh so well together and their chemistry is obviously palpable. I can seen why they were both paired together in more than one film. Guess I'll have to go check out their films now.

 

3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

It's obvious that there is a very clear sense of decency being depicted here in both clips as far as courtship is concerned. How the characters interactions with one another is displayed as being very proper and well intentioned even though the main male character is a bit of playboy and the main female character is some what snobbish, it still works out because they're both equally matched and can't fight the overwhelming sense of attraction. Plus you can't deny that chemistry, right?

I actually do expect to see more male/female relationships to depicted like this in films under the code especially from this era specifically because after the seemingly questionable moral standards of the pre-code era, the Hollywood Film Code was created and enforced to encourage a more wholesome image for the public to embrace and ultimately fashion themselves after. This was especially important where young people were concerned since they made up the majority of audiences that were filling up the movie houses. By using characters like that Of Sergeant Bruce and Rose Marie as example to depict what a proper relationship with opposite sex should be like, there was hope that young people would be able to develop a sense of morality and ethics in order to avoid making the same mistakes of their predecessors. At least, that was the idea. Although, there was seemingly good intentions behind the development of the film code, unfortunately, many studios used it as a way to control and take advantage of the actors/actresses that were contracted under them.

 

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1. As you stated, Jeannette MacDonald was a much better actress than Eddy was an actor, but the dress of a Canadian Mountie would be somewhat inhibiting.  In the 1st clip, there were many emotions moving across MacDonald’s face as Eddy sang, and she was quite expressive with her hands.  It was obvious she wasn’t thinking of him, but heard the voice of her Italian tenor.  Only when she became aware that Eddy was flirting with her, that “Rose Marie” changed from just a song to a moonlight serenade.  Her whole demeanor towards him melted, and she was able to convey this with her expressions and face-to-face engagement.  Eddy’s most natural reaction was when they began to banter about using different girls’ names in the song, particularly when he spoke of Maude.

In the 2nd clip, I really felt for MacDonald.  My brother was a professional musician and I attended many gigs.  I remember a few where the band and the audience were definitely out of sync.  I could relate to Jeannette’s discomfort and frustration, as an audience in such a scene can go from oblivious to rowdy to outright hostile, especially when alcohol is present.  MacDonald would just want this whole thing to be over, especially when Eddy sits with the dolls.  Knowing someone in an audience usually makes the performer more nervous.  MacDonald is adorable when she tries to perform like the swingin’, singin’ doll.  As she makes her exit, she and Eddy look at each other, and she is embarrassed.  Eddy just keeps the same look on his face as he watches her exit and leaves to follow her.

2. I have never really watched an Eddy/MacDonald film.  The few scenes I did see seemed stiff and stilted to me.  I much prefer the Busby Berkeley films with their snappy dialogue.  These film clips opened my eyes to the many dimensions of Jeannette MacDonald, and her incredible beauty.  I will definitely catch their films in the future.  I love classic opera, but the light form of it is not to my taste.

3. There are decent women and not so decent women, and the male roles can move between the two without much condemnation, because they always fall for the decent women in the end.  There is mostly flirtation with facial expressions and banter sprinkled with much innuendo.  I’ve noticed that these 1930s and ‘40s films I watched as a child and adolescent were much like the Biblical parables in that there were layers of meaning.  As a child, I wasn’t even aware of the sexual undertones in these films, but as an adult they were obvious.  I know people might prefer the very realistic films of today, but I find that the movies that had to insinuate violent and sexual themes activated my imagination much more.  Seeing shadows on a wall conveying a violent act was more disturbing to me than seeing the actual violence itself.  It allowed me to personalize the scene.  And I am a romantic and would rather keep the bedroom private.  In fact, there is very little romance in film today. Right off the bat, they're down to the nitty-gritty.

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1.  The filmmakers do a good job a depicting the attraction between the two of them.  You notice Jeanette's attraction when Nelson is singing in the first clip.  There are various times when the camera focuses on her and we can see her interest piqued in the lyrics of the song.  Conversely in the second clip the facial queues portrayed by Nelson portray his affection for Jeanette while she is singing and failing to mimic the moves of the other singer.  

2.  I have never seen any other films with these two actors in them.

3.  In the first clip a theme is present that is pervasive in many many films over the course of time:  a budding romance involving two people that begins while one, or both, of them are in love with someone else.  In the first clip Jeanette is on her way to see another man, while Nelson at first seems to only have eyes for Jeanette.  However we come to learn that he may also be involved with another woman as he has simply substituted her name in a song he may have sung numerous times for other women.  

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1. In the first scene he admits that he loves her but she is mocking him to cover up the fact that she likes him. In the second scene, they steal look at each other but pretend they didn't look at each other. While she sings he smiles. 

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I'm late to this discussion but was reminded in watching the Daily Dose clip of the deep and lasting influence that movies have on culture and establishing social norms.  The good girl/bad girl dichotomy is an enduring theme - and not one contributes to an equal status for women and girls, IMO.  

When McDonald was trying to sing and couldn't get the attention or respect of her audience it reminded me of Diane Keaton's timid attempts in the NYC nightclub. Sometimes you just gotta OWN it.  Or as Rose urged her daughter, "sing out Louise!".    image.jpeg.355711aaf2458941c64eeafa76e003cd.jpeg

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Daily Dose #2

1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

They never touch. They are only ever love in their eyes. Their voices are each so powerful and they are flirtatious in their singing in the first clip. In the second, there is no judgement from him. He understands how hard it was to put herself out there like that. He supports her. Yet she is embarrassed.

2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I haven’t seen other films with these two actors. I will definitely try and catch more movies with them to form a more accurate opinion.

3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

The code might have effected they way they loved each other physically. There was no physicality to their relationship in these two clips. He told her he loved her through song. She playfully mocked him. He might have gotten more physical with it in the boat. He mores more respectful. The bar scene may have been different without the code, with the other performer. She may have been dressed differently (more raunchy).

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As described above by avintagenerd, the inability for women to be portrayed as anything other than "good" or "bad" is very evident in the second clip. There's no allowance made for the possibility that women can be both...including all elements of that spectrum. Again, I realize the context that supports this portrayal. 

 

Note: I'm unable to get to these boards immediately so am not posting responses to the questions per se, as they have been well covered in the hundreds of posts already made. I do read them and will do a better job of contributing should there be anything rattling around in my brain that hasn't already been said repeatedly. 

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1) In the first clip there is a definite playfulness in their attraction.  Her kidding him about his song was her way of hiding her attraction.  

2) I have not seen any other films with these actors.  But after these clips, I am eager to see more. 

3.) I did find it interesting that the crowd didn't respond to the "wholesome" singer but came around to the not so wholesome singer. 

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Daily Delight #2

In the first clip, it's very obvious that Eddy is attracted to the character McDonald plays. As actors they seem to have a natural ability to interact with each other that is very smooth and believable. For instance when McDonald lets Eddy know that he changed the name of the girl in the song it's just a smooth transition, very natural. One would almost think that they were a "couple" outside of film. In the second clip you can definitely see that he is concerned about what is happening to her when she is trying to sing.

When seeing them in other films, I have witnessed the same ease with them in portraying the characters. It just seems natural.

As far as the code, there is nothing overt that would lead you to think about a sexual relationship between the characters, but there is a definite attraction. I would say that the code didn't seem to apply to the costuming. The lady who was trying to get the men's attention was very sensually dressed and her gyrations were much like what we see in dance today. 

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1) The two characters are flirtatious - something approved of during this time (see question 3); there is playfulness about the first scene that is refreshing. They enjoy each other's company, are comfortable with each other - the building of a healthy relationship. This might be something 'different' for the time period, probably not the reality of society as a whole as women weren't seen on the same level as men as of yet. Once again, Hollywood and the media using propaganda to convince us of things (for good or for ill) The code Hollywood imposed on movies was their attempt to dictate morals of society - these scenes show what the expectation of a relationship might be; although I'm not sure how many real relationships follow a movie plot of star crossed lovers ;) 

2) I do not believe I have seen any movie in its entirety with either of these two - guess I better get watching!

3) the relationship is flirtatious and cute - not too standoffish, but innocent in its portrayal. He seems more experienced (as proof through his many names in the song and even with who he brings in in the second clip); she of course is much more innocent as seen in the second clip - not understanding the ways of those wild men - although she understands how to work her womanly magic in the boat. This seems to be the conundrum of many female characters of the time - they should shown as naive, but knowledgeable about how to 'woo their man'

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