Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I know that Singing in the Rain is about when silent movies became talkies. But after watching Broadway Melody, I see so many similarities that makes it seem like Singing in the Rain wants us to believe that Broadway Melody is supposed to be the movie that stole ideas from! The main thing that jumped out was both movies use the songs "You were meant for me", "Broadway Melody" and  "Wedding of the Painted Doll". Does anyone know if SITR was trying to pay tribute to BM?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't be surprised if it was. The "Broadway Melody" section is a pretty clear reference. I know that many of the technical issues shown in SITR were based on people's experiences and memories of the move to sound.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Singin' in the Rain intended to portray Hollywood as it was during the transition from silent to talkies and the early musical era.  The filmmakers purposely selected songs that were written during that era to use in the film.  The montage of songs with "Beautiful Girls," "I've Got a Feeling You're Foolin'," "The Wedding of the Painted Doll," and "Should I?" is supposed to represent the transition from silent to sound.  Most of the songs in the film were used in previous films.  "Singin' in the Rain," was performed in The Hollywood Revue of 1929 and I'm pretty sure Judy Garland sings it in one of her films, I'm thinking Little Nellie Kelly though I might be mistaken.  "Good Morning" was in one of the Judy/Mickey movies.  

Only a couple new songs were written: "Moses Supposes," and "Make 'Em Laugh" (which suspiciously sounds like "Be a Clown").  

I would agree that Singin' in the Rain is paying tribute to its predecessors through the inclusion of music from the early MGM musicals. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I think Singin' in the Rain intended to portray Hollywood as it was during the transition from silent to talkies and the early musical era.  The filmmakers purposely selected songs that were written during that era to use in the film.  The montage of songs with "Beautiful Girls," "I've Got a Feeling You're Foolin'," "The Wedding of the Painted Doll," and "Should I?" is supposed to represent the transition from silent to sound.  Most of the songs in the film were used in previous films.  "Singin' in the Rain," was performed in The Hollywood Revue of 1929 and I'm pretty sure Judy Garland sings it in one of her films, I'm thinking Little Nellie Kelly though I might be mistaken.  "Good Morning" was in one of the Judy/Mickey movies.  

Only a couple new songs were written: "Moses Supposes," and "Make 'Em Laugh" (which suspiciously sounds like "Be a Clown").  

I would agree that Singin' in the Rain is paying tribute to its predecessors through the inclusion of music from the early MGM musicals. 

Absolutely agree.  MGM went to their vaults for almost all of the songs in Singin' in the Rain.  In addition to the ones you mention, "Would You" was introduced in San Francisco And they didn't stop there.  They also incorporated clips from The Three Musketeers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's actually a more personal connection between the two films, than merely being an homage. The prolific MGM musical producer Arthur Freed (head of the Freed Unit on the lot) wrote most of the songs for "Broadway Melody" so when he decided to make a movie about the silent era of movies converting to talkies - "Singin' in the Rain" - it's no wonder he utilized his earlier work, plus it made the production cheaper since the music already belonged to the studio.  There is an interesting biography of Freed in Hugh Fordin's book The World of Entertainment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...