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Am I missing that this is a parody of 1930's/1940's musicals when it was PRODUCED at that time?  I appreciate the goofiness of it but the singing is horrid and the acting (even from one of my favorites of all time, Jimmy Stewart) is marginal.   I might want to rescind this at a later date but never have I felt so strongly that most of those 2 hours viewing it were 90% wasted!

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I find it endearing.  Also, it's worth watching Eleanor Powell alone.  I understand how hard it is to relate to for many people who didn't grow up watching classic movies of this age. I lived with my great great, great, and grandmother for many years, so I am immersed in it.?

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3 hours ago, MotherofZeus said:

I find it endearing.  Also, it's worth watching Eleanor Powell alone.  I understand how hard it is to relate to for many people who didn't grow up watching classic movies of this age. I lived with my great great, great, and grandmother for many years, so I am immersed in it.?

Believe me, I have watched a TON of films from that era  - and while I did appreciate Eleanor Powell's dancing in the last scenes and Buddy Ebsen throughout - it was just such a disappointment to me since I saw it was available to watch SO many times and I felt I had missed out each time I did not get to see it.  Now at least I got that out of the way!  But I do appreciate your comments.

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3 minutes ago, MotherofZeus said:

So perhaps your "Born to Dance" is my "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" as I can't get through it.  Just can't despite the merit everyone claims. 

I never got through Seven Brides either.  ?

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 Cole Porter wrote an original score for "Born To Dance". One song from that movie, "I've Got You Under My Skin" became a standard in American popular music.  It was one of Frank Sinatra's favorite songs to sing and it certainly has been sung by every major American popular singer.

As you watch film musical starring tap dancers, you will discover where our American Music Songbook came from.

This is also true from Broadway as well.  Fred Astaire,  Gene Kelly, Bill Bojangles Robinson, Eleanor Powell, and Ruby Keeler were all Broadway Stars before they came to Hollywood.  It was first on Broadway that Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart, the Gershwins, and so many others, wrote for these tap dance stars. Then when they went to Hollywood, many of these great composers were invited to write for them at the studios.

Eleanor Powell was the top tap dancer at MGM in the 1930s and Cole Porter wrote for all of her shows.

Her career peaks with the "Broadway Melody of 1940" along with tap dancing when you have three major tap dancers starring in one movie:

 Eleanor Powell, Fred Astaire and George Murphy.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Cole Porter wrote an original score for "Born To Dance". One song from that movie, "I've Got You Under My Skin" became a standard in American popular music.  It was one of Frank Sinatra's favorite songs to sing and it certainly has been sung by every major American popular singer.

As you watch film musical starring tap dancers, you will discover where our American Music Songbook came from.

This is also true from Broadway as well.  Fred Astaire,  Gene Kelly, Bill Bojangles Robinson, Eleanor Powell, and Ruby Keeler were all Broadway Stars before they came to Hollywood.  It was first on Broadway that Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart, the Gershwins, and so many others, wrote for these tap dance stars. Then when they went to Hollywood, many of these great composers were invited to write for them at the studios.

Eleanor Powell was the top tap dancer at MGM in the 1930s and Cole Porter wrote for all of her shows.

Her career peaks with the "Broadway Melody of 1940" along with tap dancing when you have three major tap dancers starring in one movie:

 Eleanor Powell, Fred Astaire and George Murphy.

"I've Got You Under My Skin" is one of my favorite songs in the world. I adore Broadway, the American songbook.  We are on the same page with "Born to Dance" being worth the viewing.  I said, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" was my movie that is tough to sit though, though I suspect most love it.  I think my point was, we all have one movie that we don't get why it's considered great.  This was hers. Seven Brides is mine.  It does not mean that any of us don't love the history of songwriting, choreography, tap, or Hollywood's musicals.

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16 minutes ago, MotherofZeus said:

"I've Got You Under My Skin" is one of my favorite songs in the world. I adore Broadway, the American songbook.  We are on the same page with "Born to Dance" being worth the viewing.  I said, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" was my movie that is tough to sit though, though I suspect most love it.  I think my point was, we all have one movie that we don't get why it's considered great.  This was hers. Seven Brides is mine.  It does not mean that any of us don't love the history of songwriting, choreography, tap, or Hollywood's musicals.

 Well, you make a good point here. I'm a tap dancer ,so I probably am very partial to Eleanor Powell. And maybe I could understand why this film may have a little too much tap dancing for people who are not into it. But in the 1930s tap dancing was the most popular form of dance in the movies.  Throughout much of the 30 's Shirley Temple was top box office, along with Astaire and Rogers.

Ironically I'm not at all fond of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers either. And I really like Russ Tamblyn's acrobatics in West Side Story but there's just something about that movie that I don't really care for.

And the other thing you said about your great-grandmother and your grandmother--. It was my mother and my grandmother who first turned me on to old movies. We would watch them on The Late Show and they would tell me about the old Stars.

BTW-- You have an interesting stage name!

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2 hours ago, MotherofZeus said:

So perhaps your "Born to Dance" is my "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" as I can't get through it.  Just can't despite the merit everyone claims. 

Nice to know I'm not the only one!

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34 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Well, you make a good point here. I'm a tap dancer ,so I probably am very partial to Eleanor Powell. And maybe I could understand why this film may have a little too much tap dancing for people who are not into it. But in the 1930s tap dancing was the most popular form of dance in the movies.  Throughout much of the 30 's Shirley Temple was top box office, along with Astaire and Rogers.

Ironically I'm not at all fond of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers either. And I really like Russ Tamblyn's acrobatics in West Side Story but there's just something about that movie that I don't really care for.

And the other thing you said about your great-grandmother and your grandmother--. It was my mother and my grandmother who first turned me on to old movies. We would watch them on The Late Show and they would tell me about the old Stars.

BTW-- You have an interesting stage name!

I've taught myself to tap.  I lo e it. I feel it in my  bones, so your stage name is pretty impressive to me.  Eleanor Powell is incredible.  Simply breathtaking.

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3 hours ago, CynthiaV said:

I like both...I'm beginning to feel like an anomaly... ?

jk...

Cyn-Most people who know and love musicals like both of them. Michael Kidd is a great dancer and choreographer who choreographed Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. He has been greatly acclaimed for his work.

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56 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Cyn-Most people who know and love musicals like both of them. Michael Kidd is a great dancer and choreographer who choreographed Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. He has been greatly acclaimed for his work.

I love Micheal Kidd's brash, energetic choreography. It is one reason Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is my favorite musical!

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Watched it with my Mom the other day.  I hadn't seen it before, and she didn't seem to remember it.  We both found it charming.  LOVED Ebsen's dancing.... and that era of NY.  Was telling my husband about the sub CAPT today; had difficulty explaining - he was an idiot, but in an endearing way, not the 'ruin morale and careers' way.  ADORED the feature with Jalna.

Cheers!

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1 hour ago, CynthiaV said:

Thank you!

I'm sure you knew that already, but on forums and social media, courtesy and respect don't always convey as they should. I'm so glad you love these musicals. Musicals are magic.  I'm sure we'll find an awful lot more in common than not.  

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I'm joining the Seven Brides Dislike Club too (although I'm really sure there is a better name for it).

I love Howard Keel and Jane Powell and Russ Tamblyn, but that movie did absolutely nothing for me.

To each his own, though!  I've been impressed so far at how friendly people have been on these boards.  It's very refreshing (unless I've missed some unpleasantness - in that case, don't tell me).

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1 hour ago, Christy_S said:

I'm joining the Seven Brides Dislike Club too (although I'm really sure there is a better name for it).

I love Howard Keel and Jane Powell and Russ Tamblyn, but that movie did absolutely nothing for me.

To each his own, though!  I've been impressed so far at how friendly people have been on these boards.  It's very refreshing (unless I've missed some unpleasantness - in that case, don't tell me).

This is the second course I've taken here in this format and the one thing I also noticed is how kind everyone is. There are ofc differences of opinion but every one I've seen or been involved in has been respectful and adult. But it seems film ppl are naturally that way. Besides, I know Dr. Ament or Dr. Edwards or the moderators of the forum would never allow any nastiness or intimidation. It is part of the terms we all agree to when we begin the course. It's nice to have an internet safe zone where everyone can enjoy the freedom to speak honestly about our film passion.

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On 6/7/2018 at 9:17 PM, Princess of Tap said:

 Well, you make a good point here. I'm a tap dancer ,so I probably am very partial to Eleanor Powell. And maybe I could understand why this film may have a little too much tap dancing for people who are not into it. But in the 1930s tap dancing was the most popular form of dance in the movies.  Throughout much of the 30 's Shirley Temple was top box office, along with Astaire and Rogers.

Ironically I'm not at all fond of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers either. And I really like Russ Tamblyn's acrobatics in West Side Story but there's just something about that movie that I don't really care for.

And the other thing you said about your great-grandmother and your grandmother--. It was my mother and my grandmother who first turned me on to old movies. We would watch them on The Late Show and they would tell me about the old Stars.

BTW-- You have an interesting stage name!

So, just to show you how much I also enjoy Eleanor Powell, I've been compiling a play list on Youtube for songs I want to remember from this course.  I came across many not in this course that I will add to a different, but I wanted to post this for you @PrincessofTap Fascinatin' Rhythm with Eleanor Powell

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2 hours ago, MotherofZeus said:

So, just to show you how much I also enjoy Eleanor Powell, I've been compiling a play list on Youtube for songs I want to remember from this course.  I came across many not in this course that I will add to a different, but I wanted to post this for you @PrincessofTap Fascinatin' Rhythm with Eleanor Powell

Zeus-- Fascinating Rhythm is the epitome of Eleanor Powell's artistry. And it's also at the very top of Busby Berkeley's too.

The film that it comes from Lady Be Good is near the end of Eleanor's movie career, but just like Fred Astaire went out with Putting on the Ritz, Eleanor goes out on top.

What I particularly like about her and this number is that you get to see a dissection of her tap dance style.  The first part is pure tap dancing, which she no doubt she learned from Bojangles and Jack Donahue but-- even in the first part with the grand pianos she's doing these fantastic pirouettes--En dehors, en dedans, singles, doubles , triples --her ballet technique is so sharp.

In the middle part you see the percussionist that is the tap dancer and the tap dancer that is the percussionist.

And in the conclusion she goes straight into ballet technique with the chaîné turns and finally the ballerinas fouettés that are usually only performed by a ballerina in Swan Lake.   That's the level she's on. (Cyd Charisse did them in Silk Stockings too.)

The Fantastic ending is all Busby Berkeley Panache with Ellie being thrown like a slat down a bowling alley between all of those tuxedoed men.

 

Eleanor and Busby Berkeley had quite a set-to over this number and she was very very angry to have to do it 25 or 30 times to suit him. Ann Miller and Judy Garland also had a great deal of animosity against this director because of how he treated them.

Whatever sadistic or inhumain qualities he may have had, Busby Berkeley really pulled out all the stops for this tap number and it is the number that Ellie will be remembered by.( An edited version of the number can be seen in That's Entertainment 2.)

The Fascinating Rhythm song itself is from a Fred and Adele Astaire Broadway show called Lady Be Good, which was written by the Gershwins in 1924. Just as I previously noted, so many of our standard American pop songs were written for tap dancers. Fred Astaire never did Fascinating Rhythm in a movie, however he often sang it on television as the public recognized it as one of his signature tunes.

 

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15 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Zeus-- Fascinating Rhythm is the epitome of Eleanor Powell's artistry. And it's also at the very top of Busby Berkeley's too.

The film that it comes from Lady Be Good is near the end of Eleanor's movie career, but just like Fred Astaire went out with Putting on the Ritz, Eleanor goes out on top.

What I particularly like about her and this number is that you get to see a dissection of her tap dance style.  The first part is pure tap dancing, which she no doubt she learned from Bojangles and Jack Donahue but-- even in the first part with the grand pianos she's doing these fantastic pirouettes--En dehors, en dedans, singles, doubles , triples --her ballet technique is so sharp.

In the middle part you see the percussionist that is the tap dancer and the tap dancer that is the percussionist.

And in the conclusion she goes straight into ballet technique with the chaîné turns and finally the ballerinas fouettés that are usually only performed by a ballerina in Swan Lake.   That's the level she's on. (Cyd Charisse did them in Silk Stockings too)

The Fantastic ending is all Busby Berkeley Panache with Ellie being thrown like a slat down a bowling alley between all of those tuxedoed men.

 

Eleanor and Busby Berkeley have quite a set-to over this number and she was very very angry to have to do it 25 or 30 times to suit him. And Miller and Judy Garland also had a great deal of animosity against director and how he treated them

Whatever sadistic or inhumain qualities he may have had, Busby Berkeley really pulled out all the stops for this tap numbers and it is the number that Ellie will be remembered by.( An edited version of the number can be seen in That's Entertainment 2.)

The Fascinating Rhythm song itself is from a Fred and Adele Astaire Broadway show called Lady Be Good, which was written by the Gershwins in 1924. Just as I previously noted, so many of our standard American pop songs were written for tap dancers. Fred Astaire never did Fascinating Rhythm in a movie, however he often sang it on television as the public recognized it as one of his signature tunes.

 

I knew about Berkeley being a pain in the keister. Judy did a good job of recking herself, but he certainly added his special sauce to her experience. He was an amazingly gifted visual artist, and I think the likes of he, Poweel, and Garland (as a triple threat) are very rare. Thanks for putting all your knowledge into the response above.  Love it.

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