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Rather surprised to see West Side Story's not being broadcast, but then they're having a Fathom Event for it, so that explains that.

Tom Thumb comes to mind, mainly because of Russ Tamblyn.  Wonder just how many animated films, if any, we could or should have talked about - No discussion of Snow White, Pinocchio - guess Disney is off limits.

 

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am deeply sorry that Turner Classic Movies (TCM) hasn't used the 1936 version of Show Boat.  The 1936 "Show Boat" is owned by MGM.  The earlier movie features great performances from Irene Dunne, Helen Morgan, and Paul Robeson.  It is a shame.  Here is Paul Robeson singing "Old Man River".

 

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Today, I went to the library and I went to their bookstore. I saw Muppets Take Manhattan and I bought it. Now, that is a movie musical and the Muppets trying to get their play on Broadway.

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Now that we are in the 60s and beyond, I'm quite surprised that the professors haven't chosen to highlight Judy Garland's magnificent comeback, 1954's A Star is Born, which in anyone's book is one of the highlights of that decade in musical film, and of Garland's career. Did I miss it, or am I correct that it wasn't featured as part of the conversation? I love High Society but I don't think it's as important as A Star is Born, so maybe it could have been featured instead of that movie for the lecture video, or at least given some attention? Thoughts?

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The Monkees’ Head was also omitted. Some of the omissions don’t make a lot of sense, like the entire R & H body of work (but one has to assume that Turner and R & H don’t play well together). 

Another film I would have enjoyed seeing in the lineup is the Sigmund Romberg biopic, Deep In My Heart.

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I was disappointed not to see "Hello, Dolly!"(1969) in the TCM lineup, but I guess they opted to license "My Fair Lady" (1964) from Fox instead. Even though it's not considered as much of a classic as "The Sound of Music" (1965), etc., I consider it to be a quintessential example of the movie musical, with its ebullient Jerry Herman score,  athletic choreography by Michael Kidd, delightful direction by the great Gene Kelly, and fabulous cast including Barbra Streisand as Dolly and the future Phantom of the Opera Michael Crawford as Cornelius. It's impossible to be in a bad mood after watching it, and to me, that is the hallmark of a great musical.

 

 

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On 6/18/2018 at 5:27 PM, Charlie's Girl said:

Agreed.  I mentioned in another thread (maybe two) that I think there's too much Judy Garland in this course.  The Wizard of Oz would have been sufficient, escpecially considering that so many other worthy films were left out. 

One can NEVER have too much Judy. She is the Queen.

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I'd like to at least add a mention of these, which are not on today's lecture notes:

I second (or third) "All That Jazz" (1979)

"Pennies from Heaven" (1981)

"O Brother Where Art Thou" (2000)

And these two from the 60's:

"The Producers" (1967) - not really a musical, but has a lot in common with backstage musicals, and was remade into a more proper musical.

Second "Head" (1968).

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5 minutes ago, nohojim said:

I'd like to at least add a mention of these, which are not on today's lecture notes:

I second (or third) "All That Jazz" (1979)

"Pennies from Heaven" (1981)

"O Brother Where Art Thou" (2000)

And these two from the 60's:

"The Producers" (1967) - not really a musical, but has a lot in common with backstage musicals, and was remade into a more proper musical.

Second "Head" (1968).

Sorry! I saw All That Jazz and was disappointed. The other ones???

 

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I was very disappointed in the lecture notes today. A list of movies does not really say a lot without a little more context and discussion. Almost anyone can make a list these days with google. The lecture video was awesome - but the notes were lame.... Sorry.....

 

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1. I agree about the wonderful Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971)!

2. Adding to the list of popular jukebox musicals: Moulin Rouge! (2001). Baz Luhrmann is one of those "love him or hate him" directors who depends on big spectacles, and music is a key part of all his work, so it's natural that his most popular film (at least I think it is) is an actual musical.

3. In the category of "odd attempts at a musical where the songs seem unnecessary to an already-fantastic story," I nominate Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969). As I recall, the songs are intended as intimate asides where the main characters (Peter O'Toole and Petula Clarke) reflect on their emotions. But since most of the film plays as a standard drama, every time someone starts singing, it seems a bit . . . much. Maybe it's because genre conventions are so strong that it jars me when a film tries to blur them. Still, Peter O'Toole is wonderful.

4. The Great Muppet Caper (1981) includes a tribute to (and parody of) the whole Esther Williams/Bathing Beauty (1944)/water ballet craze:

As a bonus, the film also features the great Diana Rigg and a hilarious scene with John Cleese. I love anything that pokes fun at British stereotypes (and Americans' sort of exaggerated notion of what it means to be British).

5. That reminds me . . . the role of Ivor Novello songs in Gosford Park (2001) which is set in 1930s England.

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On 6/26/2018 at 10:32 PM, nohojim said:

I'd like to at least add a mention of these, which are not on today's lecture notes:

I second (or third) "All That Jazz" (1979)

"Pennies from Heaven" (1981)

"O Brother Where Art Thou" (2000)

And these two from the 60's:

"The Producers" (1967) - not really a musical, but has a lot in common with backstage musicals, and was remade into a more proper musical.

Second "Head" (1968).

Love All That Jazz and Pennies from Heaven.  I'll add The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

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How about This Is Spinal Tap (1984),  or The Rutles: All You Need is Cash (1978), but I think that's a TV film not released in theaters.  Was Rutles 2: Can't Buy Me Lunch (2004) ever released in theaters? 

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On 6/15/2018 at 9:48 AM, Babs54 said:

Watching these old musicals bring back memories of more that I saw growing up that haven’t been shown in years:

The Boys From Syracuse; The Kid From Spain, Roman Scandals (I think Betty Grable was a Goldwyn Girl in the chorus), Whopee, with Eddie Cantor.  

You would think TCM would show these. I saw Rio Rita (with John Boles) once on TCM and think they should show these more often along with the silents. These are the closest remnants to those original Broadway shows from the days of Zigfield.

I believe it was Lucille Ball in Roman Scandals.

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All that Jazz has become my favorite Fosse Musical I wish we could have seen, and I wish they would release the Roadshow version of Dr. Doolittle. They cut out one of my favorite Leslie Bricusse songs - “Something in your Smile”.  You can it on the Soundtrack album.

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On 6/28/2018 at 8:41 PM, Pastiche said:

How about This Is Spinal Tap (1984),  or The Rutles: All You Need is Cash (1978), but I think that's a TV film not released in theaters.  Was Rutles 2: Can't Buy Me Lunch (2004) ever released in theaters? 

This Is Spinal Tap and the first Rutles movie are classics not to be missed!

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