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I feel like crying. As I was listening to Dr. Ament talking about how back in the early days of movie musicals they weren't trying to sell records as much as they were trying to market sheet music for the songs. When my grandfather died in 1969 I went down with my dad to help him go through his things. I brought a lot of sheet music of that era home with me and held onto it for years. The only really well known piece of sheet music was Rum and Coca-Cola by the Andrews Sisters, but I remember something from Dixie (a 1943 movie I had never heard of and still have never seen) and something from Maurice Chevalier probably from around the Love Parade era but I don't recall), and some other that probably Dr. Ament and Dr. Edwards would know something about.

Well I carted that stack of sheet music around with me everywhere I moved to, even though I hadn't had access to a piano in many years, but when I finally started getting tired of having so much "stuff" I listed them on Ebay. None of it sold, so i donated them to the Salvation Army Thrift Store (I think). The reason I say I think is because I'm 99.99% sure I disposed of the sheet music...but I'm going to go digging through my closets and boxes this weekend and hoping that by some miracle I still have them If I do I'll scan the covers and share with you guys.

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29 minutes ago, BlueMoods said:

None of it sold, so i donated them to the Salvation Army Thrift Store (I think). The reason I say I think is because I'm 99.99% sure I disposed of the sheet music...but I'm going to go digging through my closets and boxes this weekend and hoping that by some miracle I still have them If I do I'll scan the covers and share with you guys.

Don't worry, you carried your sheet music burden long enough.  I'm betting a lot of these are in digital form somewhere;  if not online then in various archives.  Every musical era has its moment in the sun and then mostly vanishes into obscurity when its fans die off.   

Another example,  I went to hear Tiny Tim perform a few weeks before he died (yeah, I'm that much of a geek), and what was most of his act?   Turn of the century vaudeville and music hall songs.  That's what he was really interested in.   I knew a number of them because yeah, I'm that much of a geek, but most of the audience was biding their time and then getting antsy for "Tiptoe".   But he gave a great solo show with his ukulele.  Thanks for the memories, Tiny. 

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I'm not surprised that that's what he would have been into, since the song was written in 1925. I knew a lot of those old standards because I'm a geek, too, and because my parents were actually old enough to be my grandparents. They were coming of age during the period we've been studying this week so my mom hummed and sang a lot of them when she was cleaning and such.

Let's see how much of a geek you really are, though...I may have you beat. Did you sit around with your family and sometimes friends listening to the Mitch Miller Sing-Along albums? My parents had Every. Single. One. That was our entertainment after dinner, either as a family or when my mom had one of her dinner parties.

I knew I would love this class but I didn't realize how much of a nostalgic stroll through Memory Lane it would turn out to be!

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BlueMoods, you do have me beat. Sounds like you grew up in a fun family.  We didn't have the Mitch Miller albums though I occasionally remember seeing the TV show.  My mom thought pop music was low-brow so we only had classical music for albums and radio.  My dad knew a lot of the pop songs/big band music from the 30's and 40's though, from when he was growing up.  

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I collect old sheet music.  I found a suitcase full in our basement when I was a kid.  I no longer play but I love the covers from the various movies.  I continued to collect long after finding the initial batch.  I wish there was an easy way to display it, though.

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1 hour ago, Suzanne1228 said:

I collect old sheet music.  I found a suitcase full in our basement when I was a kid.  I no longer play but I love the covers from the various movies.  I continued to collect long after finding the initial batch.  I wish there was an easy way to display it, though.

If there where you have easy access to them it would be awesome if you had songs we heard in the various movies we've seen/will see throughout this course. I looked for mine over the weekend but I didn't find them so I know I must have passed them along. Maybe my packrat of a mother had the right idea. She never got rid of ANYTHING because she might want or need it later on.

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On 6/8/2018 at 11:50 PM, BlueMoods said:

I'm not surprised that that's what he would have been into, since the song was written in 1925. I knew a lot of those old standards because I'm a geek, too, and because my parents were actually old enough to be my grandparents. They were coming of age during the period we've been studying this week so my mom hummed and sang a lot of them when she was cleaning and such.

Let's see how much of a geek you really are, though...I may have you beat. Did you sit around with your family and sometimes friends listening to the Mitch Miller Sing-Along albums? My parents had Every. Single. One. That was our entertainment after dinner, either as a family or when my mom had one of her dinner parties.

I knew I would love this class but I didn't realize how much of a nostalgic stroll through Memory Lane it would turn out to be!

My mother and granny used to talk about Mitch Miller Sing-Along all the time. They were also huge, huge fans of The Kingston Trio, Woodie Guthrie, The Wayfaring Stranger with Burl Ives, and the Almanac Singers. 

My great granny used to have sheet music she'd pull out to play for me, including:  "I'm Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover," "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree," "Five Foot Two Eyes of Blue," "St. Louis Blues," "Blue Skies," "April Showers," "September Song," "Let Me Call You Sweetheart," "Tea for Two," "Three Coins in a Fountain," "Night and Day," "Stardust," "Alexander's Rag Time Band," "Yes, Sir, That's My Baby," "Pennies From Heaven," "Embraceable You," "It's Only a Paper Moon,"Into Each Night Some Rain Must Fall," Mairzy Doats," and "Always, (I'll Be Loving You)".  

Those are the ones I remember my great-grandmother playing. I remember sitting beside her on the piano bench as her hands played so beautifully. I could hear her perfectly polished nails clicking on the keys as she touched them. Meanwhile, I was mesmerized by the covers of the sheet music she wasn't play.  She'd always let me pick what she played next.  Such wonderful  memories together.  

This is a delightful memory you've conjured.  Thank you for the topic.

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2 hours ago, BlueMoods said:

If there where you have easy access to them it would be awesome if you had songs we heard in the various movies we've seen/will see throughout this course. I looked for mine over the weekend but I didn't find them so I know I must have passed them along. Maybe my packrat of a mother had the right idea. She never got rid of ANYTHING because she might want or need it later on.

I don't have sheet music, and I don't have rights to the videos I was able to compile on Youtube, but I believe I've pulled a strong representation of the movies thus far for Week One: Selected Music and Videos from Mad About Musicals Week1: No rights or affiliation with TCM or Ball State

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Wow, did this get my brain moving-I have a piece of sheet music from 'The Pirate' with Gene and Judy.  It shows it's age.  I keep it tucked away.

I'll see if I can uncover it.  I don't remember if I have anything older than that or not. 

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41 minutes ago, pbm said:

Wow, did this get my brain moving-I have a piece of sheet music from 'The Pirate' with Gene and Judy.  It shows it's age.  I keep it tucked away.

I'll see if I can uncover it.  I don't remember if I have anything older than that or not. 

If you do please scan it for us. i would love to see that.

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On ‎6‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 11:44 PM, BlueMoods said:

If you do please scan it for us. i would love to see that.

I actually have more than I remembered - 'American in Paris' among them.  I'll try scanning and sharing this weekend.

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Ok, I need some help.  It says I can only attach 3MB-Have no idea what that is.  I've shrunk them down and even made a word document. 

Right now my sheet music pictures are in jpg.  I have American in Paris, The Pirate, Singin in the Rain, and newer one's like Music Man,

Sound of Music, Fiddler on the Roof and more.

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On 6/11/2018 at 9:57 AM, BlueMoods said:

If there where you have easy access to them it would be awesome if you had songs we heard in the various movies we've seen/will see throughout this course. I looked for mine over the weekend but I didn't find them so I know I must have passed them along. Maybe my packrat of a mother had the right idea. She never got rid of ANYTHING because she might want or need it later on.

I really wish they were.  They are in a box in my garage but near the back and behind a bunch of other things.  I really wish I could get to them because I wanted to look at the lyrics for Shuffle Off to Buffalo to see if the "tummy" is part of the original lyric.

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On 6/8/2018 at 10:50 PM, BlueMoods said:

Let's see how much of a geek you really are, though...I may have you beat. Did you sit around with your family and sometimes friends listening to the Mitch Miller Sing-Along albums? My parents had Every. Single. One. That was our entertainment after dinner, either as a family or when my mom had one of her dinner parties.

I knew I would love this class but I didn't realize how much of a nostalgic stroll through Memory Lane it would turn out to be!

 

I might not have you beat, but I might tie.  My dad, Don Scherrer, is a Dixieland jazz banjo player.  He has been a professional musician since the age of 15.  He played in Gaslight Square at Your Father's Mustache.  In 1976 he was named the Official Missouri State Ragtime Banjo Player.

I grew up with all of the songs. I was very popular at Girl Scout camp for teaching the kids how to sing Sarah, Sarah Sitting in a Shoeshine Shop.  It's a great song for drunks and/or lisping children. lol

Some of the first songs I learned when I took guitar lessons were Whispering, My Blue Heaven and Darktown Strutter's Ball. 

So many great memories!  And here in St. Louis, there is a thriving traditional jazz scene with some amazingly talented people in their late 20s.  They are talented and have a true respect and love for the history and tradition of the music.

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On 6/11/2018 at 12:43 PM, MotherofZeus said:

I don't have sheet music, and I don't have rights to the videos I was able to compile on Youtube, but I believe I've pulled a strong representation of the movies thus far for Week One: Selected Music and Videos from Mad About Musicals Week1: No rights or affiliation with TCM or Ball State

That's a great playlist!  Thanks for sharing it.

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8 hours ago, Suzanne1228 said:

I might not have you beat, but I might tie.  My dad, Don Scherrer, is a Dixieland jazz banjo player.  He has been a professional musician since the age of 15.  He played in Gaslight Square at Your Father's Mustache.  In 1976 he was named the Official Missouri State Ragtime Banjo Player.

I grew up with all of the songs. I was very popular at Girl Scout camp for teaching the kids how to sing Sarah, Sarah Sitting in a Shoeshine Shop.  It's a great song for drunks and/or lisping children. lol

Some of the first songs I learned when I took guitar lessons were Whispering, My Blue Heaven and Darktown Strutter's Ball. 

So many great memories!  And here in St. Louis, there is a thriving traditional jazz scene with some amazingly talented people in their late 20s.  They are talented and have a true respect and love for the history and tradition of the music.

I think you have me beat, having a musician in the family. That's awesome. 

Songs for drunks? Just what kind of Girl Scout troop were they running there? :D 

My husband is originally from St. Louis, but his family moved to Florida when he was a teenager. He still has family there, though.

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19 hours ago, Suzanne1228 said:

I might not have you beat, but I might tie.  My dad, Don Scherrer, is a Dixieland jazz banjo player.  He has been a professional musician since the age of 15.  He played in Gaslight Square at Your Father's Mustache.  In 1976 he was named the Official Missouri State Ragtime Banjo Player.

I grew up with all of the songs. I was very popular at Girl Scout camp for teaching the kids how to sing Sarah, Sarah Sitting in a Shoeshine Shop.  It's a great song for drunks and/or lisping children. lol

Some of the first songs I learned when I took guitar lessons were Whispering, My Blue Heaven and Darktown Strutter's Ball. 

So many great memories!  And here in St. Louis, there is a thriving traditional jazz scene with some amazingly talented people in their late 20s.  They are talented and have a true respect and love for the history and tradition of the music.

I read your response to my husband. He remembers Gaslight Square, and he's heard about Your Father's Mustache but was too young (early teens I think) to go when his family moved to Florida. If we ever get to St. Louis I've told him I want to check it out. It sounds like a fun place to hang out.

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5 minutes ago, BlueMoods said:

I read your response to my husband. He remembers Gaslight Square, and he's heard about Your Father's Mustache but was too young (early teens I think) to go when his family moved to Florida. If we ever get to St. Louis I've told him I want to check it out. It sounds like a fun place to hang out.

Your Father's Mustache closed in the early to 1970s.  Gaslight Square had a marvelous brief bright heyday and was gone by the mid 70s.  Many famous stars got their start there:  Phyllis Diller, Barbra Streisand, The Smothers Brothers...  It was a unique, tiny neighborhood that was the right place at the right time. 

I wish I had been around to see it.

My great uncle had a club called The Banjo Palace which opened in 1967 and closed in 1973.  Nightclubs have a notoriously short shelf life.

Many of the players are still around and are still playing.  My dad has provided the music for the dinner cruises on the Tom Sawyer and Becky Thatcher riverboats for the last 40 years.  But even he's slowed down to working only a few cruises a month.  I guess that can be expected when you are almost 79.

Edited by Suzanne1228
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