Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

Recommended Posts

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

My very first Judy Garland film would have to have been The Wizard of Oz.  As a young girl, playing a teenaged Dorothy Gale, I would wonder as how such a big voice came out of such a small frame.  Dancing with Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr, and Jack Haley, athletic Judy was able to keep up with the stamina of much more seasoned performers.  As a kid, I identified with young Judy with her dark hair and eyes; where my early exposure to musicals was with the lithe, fair-haired Ginger Rogers

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I'm glad to say that Judy's talent grew up as she did.  Performing with Astaire and Kelly, she becomes more of a love interest.  Although I still struggle with seeing Astaire as a leading man.  I do not question his ability to tear up a dance floor.  However, he does not inspire romantic feeling watching him with his partners, be it Judy or Ginger.  I keep ending up wondering, "why is that old man making eyes at the teenager?" I enjoy seeing her paired with Gene Kelly.  They seem equally matched.

On a completely unrelated note: my great-grandmother and my great-aunt owned a diner in Atlantic City that was mainly decorated with large portraits of Judy Garland, Liza Minelli, and Marilyn Monroe.  Right off the BoardWalk, the diner was a frequent haunt of the performers in the casino shows.  Somewhere in the family archives are all of those beautiful old pictures.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

In Meet me in St. Louis and Me and My Gal, Judy's adult powerful voice makes us believe in the power of her performance to prove she's in love, broken hearted, or disappointed.  I believe I prefer her later years performances when she's a much more mature presence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Admittedly, I am a bit of a novice when it comes to the musical genre. Like almost everyone else, my first experience with Judy Garland was The Wizard of Oz as a child and as one can imagine it would be years before I experienced anything else with her in it. Sadly, the number of years is almost embarrassing, but when I did finally see her in something other than Oz it was her triumphant return in A Star is Born. I was decently oblivious to the tumultuous happenings in her life and career and was taken aback by how old she appeared at only 32 years old. As a result, I fell down the rabbit hole of learning about Garland's heartbreaking life and early demise. My first impressions were initially wrapped in the wonder that The Wizard of Oz offered me as a child and continues to offer children even to this day (my wife and I watched in for the first time with our four year old daughter this past Thursday and she was enrapt). Outside of the two aforementioned films, I remember seeing her in Babes in Arms with Mickey Rooney and marveling at her talent evident outside of Oz in the same year. 

 

More so than realizing it after the two clips in our Daily Dose, I have to say I'm stunned to learn Garland did not have a dancing background. It is not an understatement when you said she held her own with Gene Kelly in For Me and My Gal and the same can be said in the scene from Easter Parade, as well. She commands the stage, not only working up to the level of the incredible dancers she co-starred with but I would argue that she elevated them to a whole new level, as well. I just watched For Me and My Gal for the first time tonight and I have to say it is easily one of my favorites, so far. I'm gushing at this point, but the singing, the dancing, and the comedic sensibility all wrapped up in an image that made people think she was the quintessential girl next door makes it hard for me to offer up anyone that could be described in the same fashion. 

 

I'm enjoying my time in this course and the films it has opened me up to seeing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first Judy Garland movie was the Wizard of Oz. I still to this day tear up when she sings “Somewhere over the Rainbow”. It has such a melancholy tone to it. She is longing for something better than what she has. It is such a beautiful song, quite honestly if Shirley Temple in deed got the part of Dorothy there is no way she would have had the same results. Simply beautiful. 

I don’t see any difference in the clips. I always thought Judy Garland was an extremely talented woman. She did it all, singing, dancing, dramatic acting and comedy. We would be hard pressed to find someone of her caliber in today’s industry!!

i must confess and say that I have not seen any of her later movies. I will have to make a conscience effort to view them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? The Wizard of Oz, what else?  I remember it being introduced by Danny Kaye (I looked it up, he hosted four years from 1964 to 68).  He came skipping down a yellow brick road towards the camera; and as he cautioned young viewers that there were some scenes that might be frightening he made a face that was supposed represent the Wicked Witch but i found it more funny than scary (Danny might have been my first crush).  I also remember watching Easter Parade every Easter Sunday (and still do).  What was your impression of her?  I think I was probably too young to have an impression per se but I obviously wanted to be like her, as I spent many afternoons after school acting out the scenes and singing along with a recorded condensed version of the movie; I carried a stuffed dog (that I called Toto, but didn't look anything like him) in an Easter basket, and wore out a pair of red shoes that sort of looked like Dorothy's ruby red slippers.  

 2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?I don't view her any differently because I've always appreciated and enjoyed her immense talent.  But while I'm well aware Judy was an accomplished dancer I don't think I can recall any of her other musicals in which she tapped like she does in the "For Me and My Gal" number with Gene Kelly.  I found myself watching the clip again so I could focus on the steps ("Back essence", "Scissors" "Paddle Turns") and wondered, if it was necessary, who "Sweetened" the taps.  Bobby Connolly was the Dance Director but I also wondered if Gene choreographed that dance routine.

The Couple of Swells number has always been a favorite; Judy's facial expressions on the "We'd like to tell you who we kissed last night but we can't be cads" line cracks me up every time.   I remember Judy saying how she went to wardrobe and was able to pick out pieces for her hobo costume and Fred evidently did the same but he couldn't make himself look grubby enough, he'd get sent back to wardrobe but come back still looking too dapper. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? I don't know that I'd say it was an "increasing ability" it seems she always had that.  I recall being incredibly moved by her singing "But Not For Me" in 1940's Girl Crazy (a year after Oz) after she sings the verse she bows her head, then as she starts, "They're writing songs of love..." she slowly raises her head, looking up through her lashes with moist eyes; that shot and the throb in her voice always gives me a lump in the throat.  Ten years later when she sings "Friendly Star" in Summer Stock, there's those same liquid eyes and the poignancy in her voice that brings a lump to the throat.  Another four years she's giving an undeniably dynamic performance in A Star Is Born and knocking your socks of with "The Man That Got Away".  While the later is a more iconic number of a mature Judy if you view the other two songs (go to You Tube) I think you'll see what I mean, she's always been able to capture the imagination and stir the emotions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

My 1st movie of Judy Garland was The Wizard of OZ. My impression of her was OMG the young lady has one heck of a voice.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

After viewing the clips I know see the comic side of her. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Meet me in St Louis is one of the one that always stand out to me more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The first Judy Garland film I remember seeing is "For Me and My Gal" (and coincidentally, it's been my favorite ever since). Now that I've learned more about her, I can put the movie in context as one of her first grown-up roles. In the film, she gets some opportunities for both dancing and singing, and for both comedy and drama. Watching the movie for the first time, that was what I remember thinking: she can do it all! Before I knew that she was only twenty at the time, I could have sworn she was older - in a good way, based on her level of maturity and charm, and of course, her skill as a performer. She struck me as a very versatile actress, who could be innocent and kind and hopeful, while still being realistic and not overly naive. 

2. I don't think I see her particularly differently, but watching these clips just reminds me all over again what a beautiful, magnetic, and talented lady she was! Also, it reminds me that she could keep up with the best of 'em; in one scene, she's dancing with Fred Astaire, and in the other, it's Gene Kelly.

3. When I read the word "storyteller," there was one clip that I knew I had to bring up! It was a segment from the movie Ziegfeld Follies (1945), called "A Great Lady Has an Interview." For me, this is Judy at her best. The performance is over ten minutes long, and she finds a way to keep the audience engaged the whole time. She looks beautiful and she sings beautifully, and the comedic side of it is wonderful. I'll attach the video below!

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have loved Judy Garland as a singer, actress, dancer etc since I was a little girl. I use to watch her movies with my dad all the time. I'm not sure if The Wizard of Oz was the first movie of hers I watched? Or it could have been one of the Mickey Rooney & Judy Garland Movies? Anyway what struck me about her the most from the beginning was her vulnerability! I didn't see many other performers who showed that emotion and tenderness inside. I related to her. Of course, I was also so impressed with her beautiful, expressive powerful voice. I watched The Wizard of Oz every year when it was on tv usually around Thanksgiving. Besides Wizard I also especially love her movies with Gene Kelley. They're so great together and are such a romantic couple. 

The clips didn't really change my view of her since I've seen those movies and I think all her movies before. It is nice to here the appreciation of her talent. I also didn't think about her generosity toward other performers when watching. I have read that she helped Gene Kelley and gave him tips during his first movie For Me and My Gal. I think she showed her sense of humor in the films she did with Mickey Rooney too. She is also really funny in The Pirate with Gene Kelley.

I think by the time she did A Star is Born she had really matured as a performer. Her performance of The Man Who Got Away is so full of raw emotion and power in the words and interpretation! But she was always good at having the emotions and meaning come through in her songs! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like most people, the first film I saw her in was The Wizard of Oz. My impression of her in that movie was that she was sweet and wholesome, with a wide-eyed innocence. These clips, especially the first one, show a more humorous, goofy side to Judy that I really enjoyed. She also dances more and uses more physical comedy than in the Wizard of Oz. She's not afraid to look silly.

Films in her later career that come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller include Meet Me in St. Louis and A Star is Born.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my first Judy Garland film was "The Wizard of Oz" and I was about 11-12 years old. I remember thinking how magical it all was and I loved the watching Dorothy's adventures in Oz.

After watching these clips I was reminded on how amazingly comfortable and at ease she was performing. She had a certain pep in her step that those around her did not seem to have even though many of her co-stars were seasoned professionals or extremely talented, there just seemed something different about her compared to everyone around her. I also was reminded on how multi talented she really was. 

"A Star is Born" is a perfect example of of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings later in her career. I cannot help but wonder what else could she have shared with the world had she lived a longer life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. I think that my first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz, but the film real memory I have of my reaction to her in in association with Meet Me in St. Louis. I was probably five or six and as the oldest of the kids in my family I wished I had an older sibling. Judy, very quickly from seeing this movie, became the ideal older sister I wished I had. I've adored her ever since and really grown to appreciate her talent which I couldn't have even begun to understand as a child. I also remember the first time someone in my family mentioned the sadness that surrounded the end of her life and I really had a hard time understanding that as a child. It didn't seem possible to me that someone with such warmth and humor, someone I idolized could also have the darker side to her life. Though terrible as some of these things remain I think it gives each of performances even more meaning, and I like her a little more for each comeback in the latter part of her career.

2. I've seen both of these films more times than I can count so I don't know that I see her differently but both of these clips showcase her sense of humor and surprising authenticity considering the sort of campy nature of both (which I love anyway). I do like to look back on her earlier films to see the beginnings of the full on Garland personality with glimpses into what is to come as far as her acting and charm. 

3. Many others have mentioned The Man That Got Away and for good reason, I don't think I can even describe how powerful that song is with everything about the staging of the scene, the musicians and her voice and delivery of the song. I also think its important to note some of the performances from her CBS series which really capture a broad range of emotion and she delivers a story without a movie to support the performance. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (FROM TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

“Don’t try to rearrange me, there’s nothing can change me ‘cause I (don’t) care” (from "I Don’t Care")

Wasn't Dorothy everyone's first impression of Garland and didn't everyone think that she was oh just ever so adorable?  But in these clips she is already a seasoned performer.

"The Man That Got Away" is the seminal Judy Garland performance.  While some school of actors "just hit the mark and say the line," others, like Judy, aren't "acting" at all but are really feeling the full emotion of the song or dialogue.  And when you're emotionally honest and vulnerable enough to keep living and "acting" in the moment, eventually you become a virtuoso in emoting nuanced universal feelings.  This is the genius of Judy Garland and all great artists.  And because all art is a conduit of empathy, great artists grace their audiences with an expanded, deeper humanity just by their experience of it.  (This is why we should teach art and music in school.)

P.S. I loved Dr. Ament's and Dr. Edward's Video Lecture on Meet Me in St. Louis.  There's not a false note in the whole movie.  Speaking of which, did anyone notice the jazz note in "Skip to My Lou" at the end of the line, "Go to another par-ty?"  I think it's a 9th on a dominant 9th chord which is a note that you'd never hear sung in a 1903 version of the song. This lets us know that we aren't in Missouri any more.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The Wizard of Oz.  I probably watched it every year it was on TV from birth to the advent of VHS.  She died when I was only 5 years old, and I remember thinking it must be sad for her parents (I, of course, imagined her as a child rather than an adult).  I'm afraid I can't remember my first impression of her, but I loved the movie and I loved her in it.

  1. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I've seen them before, so can't really answer, but I did notice things mentioned in the lecture, such as watching her "play" the piano.  I was also focusing on her dancing, which is usually overshadowed by her singing.  She really could do it all.

  1. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

You can just see how her maturity adds to her acting ability.  I still haven't seen "A Star is Born" so I can't comment on that.  A role that struck me a lot in her later years was "Judgment at Nuremberg." Not a musical, but I love her acting in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone said earlier, it is hard to remember my first Judy Garland film.  I just grew up with her as part of the musicals I watched. I think her Andy Hardy movies always stuck with me because she was  the overlooked gal pal who suddenly becomes the focus of his attention, a theme adolescent girls would relate to. Wizard of Oz was never a favorite, so I avoided that one for many years. Watching it now with her more mature roles, I have a real appreciation for her body of work.  I think Meet Me in St. Louis is my real favorite. It is easy to see why she fell for Vincent Minnelli after seeing how lovely he makes her character in this film.  As for Easter Parade, she is the standout in A Couple of Swells partly because the dapper Fred Astaire is so out of character in his garb.  I seem to remember Gene Kelly was originally supposed to star in the film.  I would imagine that number was really for him a la the Be A Clown number in The Pirate.  Overall, the focus on her films in this module has made me a real Judy Garland fan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.  The first Judy Garland film I recall seeing was 'The Wizard of Oz', which the impression I got of her is that, she was insecure personally, while playing a character that got to expand horizons.  Her true character can be seen in 'Meet me in St. Louis'; while in other films she played more outgoing characters.  In 'Easter Parade' she plays an unsure character but still outgoing.  

2.  My views on Judy haven't changed at all.  She was someone who dealt with insecurity quite often in her life.  She dealt with struggles that actresses today don't face.  While she was an amazing talent, Mr. Mayer himself milked her talent to the point of financial gain.  Yet, Garland herself was a selfless person.  That is shown in those two clips from 'Easter Parade' and 'For Me and My Gal'.  

3.  Her performance in 'A Star is Born' the second remake of the story, captures her ability to play someone whom is a worse situation, yet has the heart to show her struggles in the movie through song.  A non-musical performance of Judy's which is a recommendation is 'Judgement at Nuremberg' in a role where she, shows emotions of terror while being asked questions by a nazi lawyer.  Yet, shows relief when Spencer Tracy dismisses the questions from that lawyer.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

My first Judy film was "Meet Me in St. Louis." I absolutely fell head-over-heels for her. I was around 13-14 at the time. Ten years later, I still adore her, and have seen MANY more of her movies. She's so talented, and she sucks you into the plot.

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Not really. I still see her as an incredibly talented human being. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

"The Pirate." The number she does when she's hypnotized is especially enthralling.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all I am behind a little LOL

Here are my answers;

  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The Wizard of Oz, Loved her from the first time she started singing

  1. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

No different still love her.

  1. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

A star is born film of course, she has grown to such a great actress and singer in this film that no one could question her talient.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1)The first Judy Garland film, like many others, was the "Wizard of Oz."  It is hard to say what my first impression was at that time. I was very young and have since read and heard of so much more.  I do remember my favorite song from the film. "Somewhere Over the Rainbow." I find myself singing it even now.  

Today, some years later, I am amazed with the breath of her career. Her ability to interact with adults in a skilled manner, her ability to span a wide range of character interactions.

2)I have very little experience with her later roles other than what has been presented in these clips.  Here I see a very talented young woman.  Not the little girl, she played in Wizard of Oz. Later I see what looks like an older Judy with Kelly.  A person who knows how to act, dance, sing and interact with her fellow artists.  I found it interesting that this was Kelly's first film. 

3)I have to again say, I did not have the experience of Judy Garland films.  As I am writing this, I am trying to figure out why.  If I were to guess, it is because I had not been born.  After my life began, I did not have the luxury or the experience of watching them at a later date.  I am hoping to take some time, during the class to remedy this situation.  Music and Musicals have been a part of my life for a long time.  But did not consist of Judy Garland. Sounds like I have to take sometime to catch up. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first movie with Judy Garland that I watched was "The Wizard Of Oz". It fascinated me and scared me at the same time. When I look at this movie today, Judy Garland seems much older to me than how I recall seeing her when I was little. I also remember watching "A Star is Born". One of her latest movies. She was playing along side James Mason. I loved James Mason. He always seemed so handsome and attractive to me, even as a little girl. This is a darker side of Judy Garland's acting and singing. You can actually feel her pain in the songs that she sings here and in the situation she is dealing with that probably was a little autobiographical for her. These songs and interpretation were deeply felt and came across the screen. A total opposite of the positivity and anything is possible from "The Wizard of Oz". She had the tremendous talent of transmitting her feelings to the audience through her songs and through her acting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

"The Wizard of Oz". Back in the day, the networks played that film each year. I saw it as a kid and was mesmerized. I remember being struck by her amazing singing talent. Years later (I've seen the film countless times and I own a special edition DVD), I was even more impressed with her acting ability.

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I'm impressed with her versatility. I've always known about her many musicals at MGM but I haven't seen many of them. Through the magic of TCM and this course in particular, I intend to catch up on some of them. Great comic timing and acting versatility come through in these clips. And her dancing! Wow, I had no idea she was such a good dancer. I'm sure the old studio system put their stars through dancing classes, acting, singing, etc., but she appears to be a natural dancer. And, lastly, there is such joy in her performing. I loved seeing her play off of Gene Kelly so effortlessly - little glances here and there, dancing right in sync with him, it's evident that she is having fun. And that is contagious. I have always been drawn to performers who find joy in their work. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

"A Star is Born" in particular. I saw a restored version quite a while ago, and I'm really looking forward to catching up with it again in this course. "The Man That Got Away" in that film is just great - she sings it with such a mix of emotions - sadness, tenderness, anger, resignation. It is a great performance, probably one of the best singing performances in a movie that I've ever seen. I haven't seen that film in years, yet that scene of her singing in a club after hours with a band still sticks with me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The first Judy Garland movie I saw was the Wizard of Oz, and I was just enamored with it! Her performance is just perfect in a role that could have easily been over the top in naivety, and her singing in Somewhere Over the Rainbow is just stunning. 

2. I don't really view her any differently in these clips; they just confirm how talented she really was.

3. Probably Meet Me in St. Louis; her performance of Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas had me in tears!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?  I remember watching The Wizard of Oz every year when I was a kid when would come on regular television. I thought she was wonderful, she could sing beautifully and got to act with all those cool characters. 

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?  She has seemed to expand and mature as an actress a great deal. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?  The Harvey Girls, Meet Me In St Louis, and although not one of my favorites,  A Star is Born.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

When I was around 5 or 6, we went to my aunt's house for a holiday (I believe it was Easter, but I'm not positive), to watch The Wizard of Oz. My aunt and uncle were the only people in our family that had a color tv! I still remember "gasping" as it went from B&W to color. We did this a few years in a row, and I just remember thinking what a beautiful voice she had.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? This is difficult for me, because I've been watching Judy for years! She was my step-dads' favorite actress and singer. I remember seeing her acting depths more clearly in her later dramatic roles. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? I've always loved "Get Happy" from Summer Stock, which is one of her later musicals that I love!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first film Judy was in with Andy Hardy shows Judy as a very young, starry eyed teen. She ages and develops by the time she arrives in Easter Parade. As she reached the middle of her careet, she no longer wanted to play a child. She wanted grown up roles. Judy grew up on the screen in front of us as we watched her sing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a topic I could discuss all day. My father first sat me in front of Meet Me in St Louis when I was very young, and told me that Judy Garland was in it. I don't know how old I was, but I was young enough to not understand the difference between Judy Garland and the character she played. I was looking for Dorothy in the movie, and I didn't believe my dad when he told me Esther Smith was played by the same person. She was so much more grown up, so much more elegant and beautiful. Nevertheless, I was captivated. Judy made such an impression on me that as a little girl, I just wanted to be Esther. I acted out that part with my little sister in the part of Tootie. We sang and danced and watched that film repeatedly all through my childhood. I have never been able to get enough of Judy. If I'm having a bad day, all I need to do is watch one of her performances and it's an instant mood lifter. It doesn't matter if I'm watching older Judy, such as in A Star is Born, or younger Judy, such as in Strike Up the Band. She brought that honest, true quality to every performance. 

I really enjoyed the two professors discussion of Meet Me in St Louis from the lecture today. I can tell Professor Ament shares my admiration and love for Judy Garland. One thing she pointed out in the notes for today's Daily Dose is that Judy is a great scene sharer. That is something I haven't really considered before but it's so true. Whether she's singing and dancing with Margaret O'Brien, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, or Ethel Merman (as she did once on her television show), Judy is so generous and more than happy to share the spotlight. She truly seems to enjoy performing with others. I encourage anyone to look up her duets from the later part of her career on television. Fabulous viewing!

Judy is well known for her ability to tell a story with her lyrics. I love listening to the early Decca recordings from when she was just a teenager. Songs like Dear Mr Gable, Sweet Sixteen, Nobody's Baby, Zing Went the Strings of My Heart, and of course, Over the Rainbow, all exemplify this quality. Later in her career, I love to listen to Judy at the Palace - a medley written especially for her by Roger Edens. In terms of her later films, I think A Star is Born stands out the most. It's tragic that Judy's bright light burned out far too quickly. She will always be remembered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was five years old when I first viewed The Wizard of Oz-- my first Judy Garland film. It was 2001-- I believe it was just remastered for VHS so there was alot of new Wizard of Oz toys in store. I got a Dorothy barbie and VHS as a gift from grandparents, and my mother sewed a Dorothy costume for me for Halloween. Let it be known, I wore those Ruby Slippers almost everyday! What I remember of this first viewing was how terrifying the Wicked Witch and the twister, and how magical the first revealing of Oz was. That scene where the sepia Kansas becomes technicolor Oz still gives me goosebumps. I remember loving Judy Garland's singing and being excited that Judy was originally from Minnesota (whoo)! I became a die hard fan of Judy Garland when I was 13. I was feeling a little sickly, so I was flipping through cable in my basement. I landed on TCM on Judy Garland day during Summer Under the Stars month. It was "In the Good Old Summer Time." I thought "oh yeah! Its the girl from Wizard of Oz!" and watched. I was hooked. The "I don't Care number" entranced me, and I kept watching the programming-- learning more and more under the tutelage of Robert Osborne and his delightful insights. The next movie was "The Pirate." It showcased her impeccable timing and wit so well. After this fateful day, I couldn't stop talking about her. I read books, watched all of her movies, and even held birthday parties for her throughout highschool. My impression of her-- that she is the greatest talent the world of music and movies has ever known-- has not changed. 

Ever since I was 13, I have constantly been viewing her differently. I think that is something natural that happens with time-- different things hit you differently at different times. What I have come to realize more and more over the years is how Judy had such a sense of nuance. In her movement, how expression, and wit. I certainly looked at the "For Me and My Gal" scene with new eyes. I never noticed how she pretended to play and read music-- she just did so naturally, I never questioned it! 

An easy answer to the third question would be her performance in "A Star is Born"-- specifically "the Man That Got Away." However, her last performance in "I Could Go On Singing" allllwwwaaaayyyysss make me weep. Firstly, because it is her last. Secondly, because it is semi-autobiographical of the tragedy of her final years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...