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I just wanted to post a correction to the lecture notes for anyone who is keeping track of all of the films mentioned in the course, as I have been. In the note about Cedric Gibbons, there is the following bullet point:

  • His works is evident in many of the movie musicals of the 1940s, including Strike Up the Band (1940), For Me and My Gal (1942), Cabin in the Sky (1943), Best Foot Forward (1943), Bathing Beauty 1944), Kismet (1944), Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), Anchors Aweigh (1945), The Harvey Girls (1946), Good News (1947), The Pirate (1948), Easter Parade (1948), Words and Music (1948) Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949), and On the Town (1949)

The 1944 version of Kismet is mislabeled as a musical; the musical version of Kismet was not released until 1955. Cedric Gibbons did work on both the 1944 and 1955 versions, however. I understand this is nitpicking, but I’m trying to see every film mentioned in the course, and figured I’d share with anyone trying to do the same. I’ll probably try tracking down both versions, although the 1955 musical seems more appropriate for the course (and easier to watch, since it’s on TCM on the 19th).

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13 minutes ago, mjbreuer said:

I just wanted to post a correction to the lecture notes for anyone who is keeping track of all of the films mentioned in the course, as I have been. In the note about Cedric Gibbons, there is the following bullet point:

  • His works is evident in many of the movie musicals of the 1940s, including Strike Up the Band (1940), For Me and My Gal (1942), Cabin in the Sky (1943), Best Foot Forward (1943), Bathing Beauty 1944), Kismet (1944), Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), Anchors Aweigh (1945), The Harvey Girls (1946), Good News (1947), The Pirate (1948), Easter Parade (1948), Words and Music (1948) Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949), and On the Town (1949)

The 1944 version of Kismet is mislabeled as a musical; the musical version of Kismet was not released until 1955. Cedric Gibbons did work on both the 1944 and 1955 versions, however. I understand this is nitpicking, but I’m trying to see every film mentioned in the course, and figured I’d share with anyone trying to do the same. I’ll probably try tracking down both versions, although the 1955 musical seems more appropriate for the course (and easier to watch, since it’s on TCM on the 19th).

 Cedric Gibbons was the Art Director at MGM from the studio's founding in 1924 until his retirement in 1956. It was the custom in those days to have whomever was head of a particular Department to be credited on every film, no matter who actually did the actual work.

Since Gibbons was part of the Arthur Freed musical unit, he certainly participated in many of the musicals of that era produced by Arthur Freed.

At the end of his career Cedric Gibbons received credit for over 1500 films.

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6 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Cedric Gibbons was the Art Director at MGM from the studio's founding in 1924 until his retirement in 1956. It was the custom in those days to have whomever was head of a particular Department to be credited on every film, no matter who actually did the actual work.

Since Gibbons was part of the Arthur Freed musical unit, he certainly participated in many of the musicals of that era produced by Arthur Freed.

 At the end of his career Cedric Gibbons received credit for over 1500 films.

Yes, I understand who Cedric Gibbons was, and the studio custom for assigning credit to works. Gibbons’ participation in the listed films from the notes is not being questioned. 

My point stands that the lecture notes contain an error, which is all that I was clearing up. By listing the 1944 version of Kismet as one of the “movie musicals of the 1940s,” the professor either mislabeled Kismet (1944) as a musical, or got the decade wrong, as the 1955 film is the musical version.

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9 hours ago, mjbreuer said:

Yes, I understand who Cedric Gibbons was, and the studio custom for assigning credit to works. Gibbons’ participation in the listed films from the notes is not being questioned. 

My point stands that the lecture notes contain an error, which is all that I was clearing up. By listing the 1944 version of Kismet as one of the “movie musicals of the 1940s,” the professor either mislabeled Kismet (1944) as a musical, or got the decade wrong, as the 1955 film is the musical version.

Thanks for pointing this out. This error about Gibbons has been expunged from the notes. Appreciate you catching it! Hope you are enjoying the course. 

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7 hours ago, Dr. Rich Edwards said:

Thanks for pointing this out. This error about Gibbons has been expunged from the notes. Appreciate you catching it! Hope you are enjoying the course. 

Dr. Edwards, the course has been so much fun. I appreciate the time and effort that has gone into creating this experience, and am truly enjoying myself, discovering a few new films while revisiting some old favorites. The insights from the lecture videos have been great, and I’ve seen quite a few of these films in a new way from the course content.

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