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I saw this when it came out, and was rather annoyed how the 60's and 70's were all mish-mushed together.   Not like the precision of Mad Men at all.  

I remember being generally unimpressed with this film, although the last part inter-cutting the army base scenes, with the suspense if Berger's buddy, who had switched places with him, would get back in time to save him, that was okay.  In a way it reminded me of D.W. Griffith.  

 

Twyla Tharp did the choreography.  She was the hot choreographer at the time.  Kind of the opposite of Fosse's exactness.  Very free-form. From Step-by-step guide to dance: Twyla Tharp:

"Twyla Tharp is America's crossover dance queen. High-minded but plain-talking, she melds classical ballet with modern dance, avant-garde experiment with Broadway pizzazz, technical rigour with off-the-cuff attitude, uptown glamour with downtown grit; above all, art with commerce........

Tharp is an inspired inventor of movement – her phrases can be an almost palpably physical pleasure to watch, with unexpected twists and punches, and often oddball dynamics. You can see all manner of off-the-cuff stuff – jazz, ballroom, aerobics, various forms of boogie – all filtered through her ferocious physical intelligence. Though she has choreographed narrative works, Tharp is generally more successful with either plotless pieces (for her compositions are never casual) or with dances which emphasize character or emotion rather than story."

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Loved it too. Well, it was the soundtrack that I really loved, I guess. I remember singing one of the songs that had a Latin word for a sex act that I didn't know at age 14. Gosh,  I really used to belt it out, too, in front of family. I'm still so embarrassed more than 30 years later! 

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1 hour ago, mariaki said:

Loved it too. Well, it was the soundtrack that I really loved, I guess. I remember singing one of the songs that had a Latin word for a sex act that I didn't know at age 14. Gosh,  I really used to belt it out, too, in front of family. I'm still so embarrassed more than 30 years later! 

I had the Original Broadway Cast album at probably age 16 and learned a few terms from that song, as well.  I still know the song by heart.  “Mother why do these words sound so nasty?”  

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Here's the version of the title song I remember - by the Cowsills - the basis for the Partridge Family!

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I have a copy of the original play.  Hated how they screwed up the movie.  So far from the script.

 

My Favorite Trivia about "Hair" the musical in New York?  Diane Keaton was in the cast and can be heard singing on the Original Cast Album.

Barry McGuire Diane Keaton NYPL.jpg

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A surprising oversight.  Hair was a brilliant Broadway musical and an equally brilliant and original musical film adaptation directed by Milos Forman.  It is one of the very few film adaptations that was equal to the play.  It's especially surprising since Prof Ament seems particularly interested in the socio-political aspect of musical film.

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On 6/23/2018 at 6:58 PM, Walter3rd said:

I have a copy of the original play.  Hated how they screwed up the movie.  So far from the script.

 

My Favorite Trivia about "Hair" the musical in New York?  Diane Keaton was in the cast and can be heard singing on the Original Cast Album.

Barry McGuire Diane Keaton NYPL.jpg

I’ve seen both the Broadway revival roadshow which was spectacular and the film when it debuted in theaters spring 1979. Honestly, I prefer the film. The play seemed disjointed, pun not intended. The ending of the film is by far more powerful and emotionally striking. To this day, it still haunts me as I missed the Vietnam draft by 3 years. Also, the opening of the movie is pure magic. I was too young to see the original cast on stage at age 7 or 8 - and wouldn’t quite understand it, anyway. I felt the film connected scenes and endeared the characters far more then the play. It’s a very underrated motion picture and still one of my favorite musical films. 

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3 hours ago, GirlWomanGal said:

A surprising oversight.  Hair was a brilliant Broadway musical and an equally brilliant and original musical film adaptation directed by Milos Forman.  It is one of the very few film adaptations that was equal to the play.  It's especially surprising since Prof Ament seems particularly interested in the socio-political aspect of musical film.

I don’t think Professor Ament purposefully slighted Hair or Chicago or even The Greatest Showman. I think it was merely an impromptu off the cuff convo to include some modern day musicals post-Tommy as they wrapped up the course. I do think that the counterculture socio-political aspects of Hair are far-reaching and deserved mentioning. Chicago was a massive oversight as it single-handedly revived the modern-day musical, flawlessly bringing all new audiences to huge domestic and international box office success plus critical acclaim, winning an astonishing EIGHT Oscars including Best Picture, breaking a 33 year drought since the incredible Oliver! I was fortunate to see in theaters as I was with Hair.

I honestly thought the screen adaptation of Hair surpassed that of the stage play and I’ve seen both. I saw a spectacular Broadway revival roadshow and I didn’t connect to the characters as much with the stage version as I did with the film, even with all the naked bodies - lol. The ending was weaker in the play as well. The film still haunts me when Berger walks into the C-47 and his voice echoes. Nothing will beat the Melba Moore opening, brilliantly art-directed with fantastic cinematography. Severely underrated film that was released too soon after the Vietnam War to make a massive box office smash. Just like 1776 - another masterpiece with an ill-timed release, it was a few years too soon. Had they kept it in the can until spring 1976, our bicentennial year and after the end of the war, it would have been a smash hit. Timing is everything.

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