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Jimmy Stewart made fun of the fact that MGM had him sing in Born to Dance.

Can you think of any other Actors or Actresses you were surprised sang (and not dubbed) in a movie?

I'll start off with Humphrey Bogart - African Queen and We're No Angels.

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Over in the Westerns thread, I think that's where we collectively bemoaned Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood singing in Paint Your Wagon. I will admit my ignorance to their singing in the movie until I was horrified to behold it happening.  

Not a good thing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Though they are not necessarily obscure, some unusual voices that surprised me were: Franchot Tone singing "Mother MacGregor" (The Lives of a Bengal Lancer), in 1935. Clark Gable singing "Puttin' on the Ritz" (Idiot's Delight) in 1939. And Basil Rathbone singing "I Do Like to be Beside the Seaside" (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes), also in 1939. Though she was a singer, I was surprised the first time I heard Harriet Hilliard sing (Follow the Fleet, 1936). She sang with, and later married the leader of the Ozzie Nelson Band. as a kid, I knew them from "The Ozzie and Harriet Show" on TV but was ignorant of their history (and their earlier radio show) at the time.

On 6/23/2018 at 3:12 PM, MotherofZeus said:

Over in the Westerns thread, I think that's where we collectively bemoaned Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood singing in Paint Your Wagon. I will admit my ignorance to their singing in the movie until I was horrified to behold it happening.  

Not a good thing.

In spite of this questionable effort, Clint Eastwood had a established history of singing (this was news to me). While starring in the TV series, "Rawhide" (1959-1965), Eastwood pursued his interest in singing in his spare time. In 1959, he produced his own collection of songs on the album, "Rawhide's Clint Eastwood Sings Cowboy Favorites."  For several years, He toured the fair and rodeo circuits between seasons of the show, performing with cast mates Paul Briniger (the cook, Wishbone) and occasionally Sheb Wooley (scout Pete Nolan). Wooley had a novelty hit in 1958, "The Purple People Eater." The country singing window seemed to shut with 'Paint Your Wagon," which, I must confess, was not very impressive. Eastwood's musical tastes shifted to Jazz. After all, a man's got to know his limitations!

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YEE-OW-SUH!! Never saw this before. Next time depression hits me, that clip is the very last thing I'd want to see! It'd send me in a downward spiral for sure!:wacko::wacko::wacko:

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10 hours ago, Whipsnade said:

Though they are not necessarily obscure, some unusual voices that surprised me were: Franchot Tone singing "Mother MacGregor" (The Lives of a Bengal Lancer), in 1935. Clark Gable singing "Puttin' on the Ritz" (Idiot's Delight) in 1939. And Basil Rathbone singing "I Do Like to be Beside the Seaside" (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes), also in 1939. Though she was a singer, I was surprised the first time I heard Harriet Hilliard sing (Follow the Fleet, 1936). She sang with, and later married the leader of the Ozzie Nelson Band. as a kid, I knew them from "The Ozzie and Harriet Show" on TV but was ignorant of their history (and their earlier radio show) at the time.

In spite of this questionable effort, Clint Eastwood had a established history of singing (this was news to me). While starring in the TV series, "Rawhide" (1959-1965), Eastwood pursued his interest in singing in his spare time. In 1959, he produced his own collection of songs on the album, "Rawhide's Clint Eastwood Sings Cowboy Favorites."  For several years, He toured the fair and rodeo circuits between seasons of the show, performing with cast mates Paul Briniger (the cook, Wishbone) and occasionally Sheb Wooley (scout Pete Nolan). Wooley had a novelty hit in 1958, "The Purple People Eater." The country singing window seemed to shut with 'Paint Your Wagon," which, I must confess, was not very impressive. Eastwood's musical tastes shifted to Jazz. After all, a man's got to know his limitations!

He may have pursued it but he never caught it.

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