Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I can't believe Lina Lamont had a career as long as she did.

Screen Shot 2018-06-24 at 6.02.04 AM.jpg

I can't believe Albert's mother would ever approve of Rose.

Screen Shot 2018-06-24 at 6.03.55 AM.jpg

I can't believe anyone thought MAME would make money at the box office.

Screen Shot 2018-06-24 at 5.58.25 AM.jpg

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lucille Ball version was awful!  I guess Angela Lansbury, who did the original stage version, wasn't big box office. Couldn't have been her age. Ball was 14 years older than Lansbury at the time. 

Besides, as much as I enjoyed the stage version, nothing could ever compare to Roz Russell's original non-musical version of "Mame". Priceless!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I can't believe anyone thought MAME would make money at the box office.

This was one of the worst big-budget musicals ever, outside of the costumes.  

Poor Jerry Herman, this film and the previous Hello Dolly! were shambles of his successful shows.  

Per IMDB trivia, Lucille Ball was 3 years older than Lucille Benson, the actress who player Mother Burnside.  (Ball was 62.)

Also: "Jerry Herman worked with Lucille Ball to improve her singing, but she could barely sustain even for one sentence without becoming winded. Even simple phrases like "Open a new window" had to be pieced together from multiple takes. Audio engineers tried to use whatever methods of processing existed at the time to make her vocals sound passable."

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Zea said:

I guess Angela Lansbury, who did the original stage version, wasn't big box office.

I believe that Lucille Ball owned the screen rights to Mame, and she had a lot to do with the casting.

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Jim K said:

I believe that Lucille Ball owned the screen rights to Mame, and she had a lot to do with the casting.

Yes, didn't she fire Madeline Kahn over creative differences? I think Madeline also wanted to jump ship to do YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN but reportedly there were conflicts between the two actresses. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, didn't she fire Madeline Kahn over creative differences? I think Madeline also wanted to jump ship to do YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN but reportedly there were conflicts between the two actresses. 

Yes, I remember that Madeline Kahn was cast as Little Glory, and I think she was fired from Mame, but I never really knew the details.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pastiche said:

 

This was one of the worst big-budget musicals ever, outside of the costumes.  

Poor Jerry Herman, this film and the previous Hello Dolly! were shambles of his successful shows.  

Per IMDB trivia, Lucille Ball was 3 years older than Lucille Benson, the actress who player Mother Burnside.  (Ball was 62.)

Also: "Jerry Herman worked with Lucille Ball to improve her singing, but she could barely sustain even for one sentence without becoming winded. Even simple phrases like "Open a new window" had to be pieced together from multiple takes. Audio engineers tried to use whatever methods of processing existed at the time to make her vocals sound passable."

She couldn't even sing when she was in those MGM musicals of the 40s. She was dubbed for most of her numbers in DU BARRY WAS A LADY. The one tune she "sang" with Kelly and Skelton (the Friendship song) she didn't sound very good but fortunately the two guys made up for her deficiencies.

She was always miscast in musicals, that's one reason why she didn't succeed at MGM as a musical star and was used in comedy instead, supporting Katharine Hepburn and Esther Williams. When she made THE LONG LONG TRAILER with Desi he did most of the singing and her one number with him she was passable, barely, because he basically sang over her and drowned her out. On her later sitcoms without Desi she had talented musical guest stars but could never do any sort of duet with any of them. So her wanting to do MAME was ill-advised, something her family and friends should have talked her out of doing. She was out of her depth and honestly made an embarrassment of herself. It was a vanity project for her, pure and simple. She had to buy the rights to do it, because no way would any other producer have willingly cast her as Mame.

She did an appearance on Phil Donahue's talk show in '74 the week the movie went into national release. I've seen the whole interview, it might still be on YouTube. She's promoting the film and her role in it. They run a three minute clip to get people interested in the movie, and it's the outdoor number where she just stands, all these people sing around her and then it goes into Robert Preston's solo. She has no singing at all in the scene. That's what they played on Donahue, because they knew if they showed a clip of her trying to sing people would see how terrible it was and wouldn't go watch the movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Jim K said:

Yes, I remember that Madeline Kahn was cast as Little Glory, and I think she was fired from Mame, but I never really knew the details.

No, it was the role of Agnes Gooch. Kahn was taken off the film and Jane Connell, who originated the part on Broadway, was brought in. This is from Connell's wiki page:

Connell's most prominent success came in 1966 when she was cast as Agnes Gooch in the original Broadway production of Jerry Herman's Mame. She recreated the role in the 1974 screen adaptation after the film's star, Lucille Ball, became dissatisfied with Madeline Kahn who had been signed originally to play Gooch.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

No, it was the role of Agnes Gooch. Kahn was taken off the film and Jane Connell, who originated the part on Broadway, was brought in. This is from Connell's wiki page:

Connell's most prominent success came in 1966 when she was cast as Agnes Gooch in the original Broadway production of Jerry Herman's Mame. She recreated the role in the 1974 screen adaptation after the film's star, Lucille Ball, became dissatisfied with Madeline Kahn who had been signed originally to play Gooch.

Oh, and all these years I've been missing Madeline Kahn's Glory.  The part was so magnificent in the Roz Russell film, and simply died in the musical film.  ? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jim K said:

Oh, and all these years I've been missing Madeline Kahn's Glory.  The part was so magnificent in the Roz Russell film, and simply died in the musical film.  ? 

I think one of the main problems between Ball and Kahn-- detailed in a book I read-- is that Ball was trying to cut the role down, because she didn't want Kahn to upstage her. Kahn wasn't having it and cried foul. So Ball fired her, Kahn went over to do the Mel Brooks movie, and Connell was brought in. 

Ball was also concerned that Bea Arthur would upstage her. Bea has that one great number and if you notice in the finished film they deliberately cut to Ball off stage in Mame's dressing room. She would not let Bea have that entire moment to herself; she had to make sure it was interrupted by redirecting the audience to a shot of her.

But Arthur's husband (Gene Saks) was directing so I guess Arthur went along with it to keep Ball from firing them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

I think one of the main problems between Ball and Kahn-- detailed in a book I read-- is that Ball was trying to cut the role down, because she didn't want Kahn to upstage her. Kahn wasn't having it and cried foul. So Ball fired her, Kahn went over to do the Mel Brooks movie, and Connell was brought in. 

Ball was also concerned that Bea Arthur would upstage her. Bea has that one great number and if you notice in the finished film they deliberately cut to Ball off stage in Mame's dressing room. She would not let Bea have that entire moment to herself; she had to make sure it was interrupted by redirecting the audience to a shot of her.

But Arthur's husband (Gene Saks) was directing so I guess Arthur went along with it to keep Ball from firing them.

Later in life, Bea Arthur said that making that movie was one of the big mistakes of her life.  She didn't have to make it -- she was already well off and was busy in a hit TV series.  I think she said that she did it as a favor to her husband.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Jim K said:

Later in life, Bea Arthur said that making that movie was one of the big mistakes of her life.  She didn't have to make it -- she was already well off and was busy in a hit TV series.  I think she said that she did it as a favor to her husband.  

Makes sense. To her credit, Arthur never said anything bad about Ball. But I don't think Ball treated her as well as she should have. Again it was a vanity (ego-driven) project for Ball.

If Ball had been able to let go of her ego, she would have hired Angela to do it then sat back and counted the profits.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You remind me that a friend of mine summed up Mame perfectly when it was released.  In both films (Russell and Ball), Agnes or Nora says "You're a loving woman, mum.  Oh you're peculiar, but you're loving."  When Nora says it to Roz, she is saying something that we already know.  When Agnes says it to Lucy, she is introducing a new facet to Mame's personality.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Jim K said:

You remind me that a friend of mine summed up Mame perfectly when it was released.  In both films (Russell and Ball), Agnes or Nora says "You're a loving woman, mum.  Oh you're peculiar, but you're loving."  When Nora says it to Roz, she is saying something that we already know.  When Agnes says it to Lucy, she is introducing a new facet to Mame's personality.

Yes, exactly, Ball didn't bring any love or compassion into her portrayal of the character. She gave us a much more self-centered version of Mame. 

Another problem is Ball's too advanced in age (and all the soft-focus lighting in the world cannot conceal the fact she's too old for the role). So instead of the little boy seeming like her nephew, he seems like her grandson.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, janey said:

I can't believe Tracy Lord would marry this version of C. K. Dexter Haven not just once, but twice.

Well if Bing was good enough for Grace to bed in real life, it wasn't too far fetched casting for Tracy to wind up w/Bing's incarnation of C.K. in the movie. :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Zea said:

Well if Bing was good enough for Grace to bed in real life, it wasn't too far fetched casting for Tracy to wind up w/Bing's incarnation of C.K. in the movie. :rolleyes:

There really is no accounting for taste, is there.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I dunno, CKDH was a cool relaxed dude, fun to be around, with good taste in music, a big house in Newport, lots of money, a great voice, and perfect rhythm. What’s not to like? 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...