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A couple of observations about today's discussion about the film of Funny Girl:

How did William Wyler deal with Barbra's diva demands -- he turned off his hearing aids and let her rant. Then did what he wanted.

Yes, this was Wyler first musical, but he actually had begun The Sound of Music before disagreements with the producers led to his existing the project.

On the Gypsy segment, they very much neglected composer Jule Styne. This time nary a mention of lyricist Bob Merrill. Without Bob, "People" would just be a pretty melody.

Barbra Streisand did not win a Tony for Funny Girl (in fact, she lost both times she was up for a competitive Tony). She lost to Carol Channing for Hello, Dolly! which is why she campaigned for the film role of Dolly Levi. Barbra's revenge.

 

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Streisand wanted "My Man" to end the stage play, which ended with a reprisal of "Don't Rain on My Parade".  On the show's closing night, she sang it after the curtain calls.

Two wonderful songs were dropped in the film:  "Who Are You Now" and "The Music that Makes Me Dance".  Dramatically, they were replaced by "Funny Girl" and "My Man".  All four were fantastic moments.  I wouldn't change the film, but I particularly miss "The Music that Makes Me Dance" which has to be the eleven-o'clock number to end all eleven-o'clock numbers.

1968 was also the year of Star!, a vastly underrated musical biography of Gertrude Lawrence starring another Broadway legend, Julie Andrews.

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A tidbit about "Second Hand Rose" that might be of interest.  The song was a sequel.  Fanny Brice introduced the song "Rose of Washington Square" in the Ziegfeld Follies.  It was so popular that when Ziegfeld put together his next version of the Follies, he asked the songwriter to write another "Rose" song for Fanny Brice, and that became "Second Hand Rose".

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On 6/26/2018 at 3:36 PM, Jim K said:

Streisand wanted "My Man" to end the stage play, which ended with a reprisal of "Don't Rain on My Parade".  On the show's closing night, she sang it after the curtain calls.

Two wonderful songs were dropped in the film:  "Who Are You Now" and "The Music that Makes Me Dance".  Dramatically, they were replaced by "Funny Girl" and "My Man".  All four were fantastic moments.  I wouldn't change the film, but I particularly miss "The Music that Makes Me Dance" which has to be the eleven-o'clock number to end all eleven-o'clock numbers.

1968 was also the year of Star!, a vastly underrated musical biography of Gertrude Lawrence starring another Broadway legend, Julie Andrews.

"His is the only music that makes me dance " was truly an exciting moment in the Broadway show "Funny Girl." The song "Funny Girl" is simply awful and there isn't really much else to say about it.

But I also really enjoyed " Who Taught Her Everything She Knows"-- that's the number with Kay Medford and Danny Meehan. It was a cute star turn for Kay Medford. And I guess it was just a number they had in there because they had to change the scenery or something. But it was a funny Vaudeville- type number and I really liked it.

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On 6/26/2018 at 10:09 AM, BartG said:

A couple of observations about today's discussion about the film of Funny Girl:

How did William Wyler deal with Barbra's diva demands -- he turned off his hearing aids and let her rant. Then did what he wanted.

Yes, this was Wyler first musical, but he actually had begun The Sound of Music before disagreements with the producers led to his existing the project.

On the Gypsy segment, they very much neglected composer Jule Styne. This time nary a mention of lyricist Bob Merrill. Without Bob, "People" would just be a pretty melody.

Barbra Streisand did not win a Tony for Funny Girl (in fact, she lost both times she was up for a competitive Tony). She lost to Carol Channing for Hello, Dolly! which is why she campaigned for the film role of Dolly Levi. Barbra's revenge.

 

William Wyler was a friend and mentor to Barbra Streisand when she started to direct movies.  And I'm sure he found her to be much easier to work with then his stellar star Bette Davis. LOL

Barbra's first musicals were part of a three picture deal that she had managed to workout before she had ever appeared in front of a movie camera. Although her television specials had had great popular and critical success on CBS.

However, Her critics said it was ridiculous to give her these contracts when no one knew whether or not she could make it on the screen. Many said she would end up just like Ethel Merman. Also there was a great deal of negative discussion about how ugly she was and how she would never be accepted by audiences on the large screen.

As usual, Barbra proved them all wrong. Barbra blazed a cinematic trail for unique women with unique talent and no one was more unique or more talented than Barbra.

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I'm not a fan of stories about how female stars who assert themselves are divas.  This isn't said about male stars.  I'm sure everyone gets fed up with everyone when making a multi-million dollar film, but Streisand has always spoken respectfully of Wyler, who also had nice things to say about her later in life.

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