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Voyage of the Damned.


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I think it was filmed in 1.85 wide screen.

 

I don't like this film. It blames Americans for what the Nazis were doing.

1976 was an anti-American era in Hollywood, because of the Vietnam war.

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*I think it was filmed in 1.85 wide screen.*

 

Seems like I've been seeing more later movies being shown full-screen on TCM lately without being obviously pan-and-scan. Is this why?

I know *4 for Texas* was, the Sinatra/Martin Western. It's one that was removed from the posted schedule right after it was shown. I presume some rights matter.

I thought I saw another of the same vintage full-screen in the last week, but don't remember what it was now.

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I double-checked. *4 for Texas* (1963) was indeed filmed in 1.85:1.

As explained on the TCM database, it will be partially clipped if your tv is 4:3, full picture if your set is 16:9.

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=75512&category=Theatrical%20Aspect%20Ratio

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=18991&category=Theatrical%20Aspect%20Ratio

 

The bottom one is *Voyage of the Damned* also in 1.85:1.

 

Message was edited by: tobitz

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My new TV is both 4:3 and 16:9.

 

When I click on "PIC 1" I get a 4:3 regular TV picture, with a black bar at each side. This is for normal TV show viewing.

 

If this was letterboxed, I'd have a black bar at each side and one at the top and bottom. Then I should click on "PIC 3" to have the letterboxed film fill up my whole TV screen.

 

But this one on TCM is pan and scan, and is being shown as a regular 4:3 TV image.

 

That stuff they posted at the bottom of your link is meaningless, since this is a normal shaped TV image and not a letterboxed image.

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Maybe I misunderstood the information TCM had posted.

My tv has only two options, 4:3, and Expand 4:3. As far as I can tell, Expand 4:3 is essentially useless unless you want ro enlarge something at the center of the screen.

TCM has really spoiled me with widescreen so that I have trouble tolerating obvious pan and scan as AMC usually shows. I would have liked to watch The Longest Day yesterday, but really have trouble watching what AMC keeps repeating, and couldn't find my vhs copy.

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Even though I personally found it intriguing to hear about the S.S. St. Louis for the first time and learn how the United States didn't accept the passengers as refugees, I would never go as far to say that it "blames America for what the Nazis were doing". That's ludicrous! I mean, the only time the U.S. are actually mentioned in the film, besides the Roosevelt statements, is when the U.S. Coast Guards send them that message saying they are trespassing and will not be allowed in the territory. I suggest re-evaluating the film, because unfortunately, I think you missed the entire message.

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I know what the message was. Over the years I?ve interviewed many refugees from various wars and mass killings around the world, including German refugees, Chinese, Russian, Cuban, etc. It?s not always easy to get directly here during every crisis. Many people often have to go to a different country first. If all refugees could come directly to American during every crisis, we?d have a population of about 2 billion people here in the US right now.

 

Here, scroll about half-way down this page and see the following information:

 

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005267

 

?On May 28, the day after the St. Louis arrived in Havana, Lawrence Berenson, an attorney representing the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), arrived in Cuba to negotiate for the St. Louis passengers.

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But as the St. Louis sailed slowly toward Miami, the negotiations continued. Bru offered to admit the passengers if the JDC posted a $453,500 bond ($500 per passenger). Berenson made a counteroffer, which Bru rejected, then broke off negotiations.

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Quotas set out in the 1924 Immigration Act strictly limited the number of immigrants who could be admitted to the United States each year. In 1939, the annual combined German-Austrian immigration quota was 27,370 and was quickly filled. In fact, there was a waiting list of at least several years. Visas could have been granted to the passengers only by denying them to the thousands of German Jews who had already applied for them.?

 

 

Why did Berenson make a counteroffer in the first place? Why didn?t he just say, ?$500 each? Ok.? Why did he try to get the President of Cuba to lower his price? Was this haggle over how much Berenson was willing to spend per person shown in the movie?

 

And why are there no pro-American movies about the other 27,370 German-Austrian refugees admitted to the US in 1939, and the 136,850 others admitted during a 5 year period in the 1930s and ?40s?

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Very deep and sad stuff coming up here Fred- your own experience must give you unique insight. In our own time, we saw a big refugee debacle during the Balkan wars of the 90's. Many countries in Europe were unwilling to let in a significant number of refugees, while doing almost nothing to try and stop the carnage. The US and Germany did most to step up to the plate and take in these people. Germany alone took in over 700,000 fleeing ex-Yugos, providing them with generous assistance.

 

For the film buffs, don't forget that "Casablanca" depicts a unique refugee situation. For people to get out of German controlled continental Europe, they had to get to Lisbon, Portugal. If you were fleeing the Axis, then you couldn't cross through Franco-controlled Spain to get there; you had to take a chance by going to Vichy controlled Morocco first. Vichy France was a stooge govt to Hitler, and so it was risky. Once the refugees were holed up in Morocco, they were at the mercy of local authorities who might or might not let them through. Anna Rauschning, in her book "No Retreat", describes how men below the age of 45 were not allowed passage to Lisbon and had to stay behind.

 

Many ethnic groups have a sad story to tell, but most of them are not equipped (or well connected enough) to get Hollywood to reflect their history and concerns.

 

Thelma

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FredC is correct, as usual. Perhaps you remember the resistance to the refugees from southeast asia durning the 1970s ?????? I remember the popular sentiment (at least in the Boston area) was "Yes, they have to escape the persecution. *BUT NOT HERE.* (Not in this country, not in this state, not in this town.)

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CASABLANCA opens with the pseudo documentary (a form all filmgoers were familiar with, since they got a fair amount of their "news" from newsreels that preceded dramatic films) because it was seen by producer Hal Wallis as a way to inject a large dose of necessary exposition into the beginning of the film, and also make the audience swallow a set-up that was patently untrue: there was no "refugee trail from Paris to Casablanca." Europeans did not sit around the Casbah and souks of Casablanca, or other Moroccan cities, waiting for exit visas, though there certainly was a steady stream of them into Lisbon. The choice of Casablanca was simply a conceit ginned up by playwrights Joan Alison and Murray Burnett for their (unproduced) stage play "Everybody Comes to Ricks."

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Hermann and Anna Rauschning were political refugees very out of favor with Hitler. Rauschning was a politician in the former "free state" of Danzig, and for a while was avidly courted by Hitler and was a house guest at Berchtesgaden. Rauschning was weirded out and disgusted by Hitler in person, and wrote a remarkable book about him called "The Voice of Destruction". His wife Anna wrote her own book about their escape from Europe called "No Retreat". They did wind up chilling out in Vichy controlled territory- in Morocco, waiting to go to Lisbon. Many others shared their fate; many were not allowed to leave. That Hermann was allowed to go was due to him being over the age of 45. Crossing through Franco held territory would have gotten them repatriated to Germany. The French authorities in Vichy controlled territories were ambivalent about enforcing German edicts, to say the least.

 

People were leaking out of Europe by any path possible; some through Turkey, some through Palestine, others through French colonies.

 

Thelma

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?Mr. Rohatyn's family eventually reached the United States in 1942 after a journey from Marseille to Oran, Algeria; Casablanca, Morocco; Lisbon, and Rio de Janeiro. He became an investment banker and later was credited with setting up a financial rescue package that guided the city of New York out of its chronic bouts with bankruptcy.?

 

http://www.iht.com/articles/2000/10/19/france.2.t_5.php

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Fred (and Thelma):

 

I always knew there had to be more to the story than what was told in the film, especially regarding the "heartless" USA's rejection of the refugees. Thanks for sharing & setting the record straight.

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Just to respond, your information was very insightful and much appreciated. All I was trying to say is that it wasn't a film that was made with the intention of making the U.S. look bad. A lot of the time when films are "based on a true story", there tends to be certain aspects that are left out, such as the info that you brought up. I can understand that I guess, because it's hard to make a film and be able to explain every little thing that comes along with it. If that was something that was required, we would have a lot less films "based on a true story".

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Malcolm McDowell got to play a nice guy after being in Clockwork Orange and Katherine Ross was really miscast that role just looked awkward

 

I loved Lee Grant in anything but wonder whatever happened to her

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