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I think I must have missed something during the last 3 weeks . . . there has been virtually no mention of animated musicals from our professors until today's lecture notes (Week 4, Day 3: 6/27/2018). So, we skipped over Snow White, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, etc. - all of the groundbreaking animated films of the early years, and we jump right to the animated musicals of the late 80s, 90s, and 2000s? I definitely missed a professorial comment somewhere during the last 3 weeks. (I'm feeling a little confused right now.)

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1 hour ago, crysalong said:

I think I must have missed something during the last 3 weeks . . . there has been virtually no mention of animated musicals from our professors until today's lecture notes (Week 4, Day 3: 6/27/2018). So, we skipped over Snow White, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, etc. - all of the groundbreaking animated films of the early years, and we jump right to the animated musicals of the late 80s, 90s, and 2000s? I definitely missed a professorial comment somewhere during the last 3 weeks. (I'm feeling a little confused right now.)

You didn’t miss it. It wasn’t there.  Head over to the thread “Animated Musical Favorites” to see what some of our  classmates like in the animated world. 

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2 hours ago, crysalong said:

I think I must have missed something during the last 3 weeks . . . there has been virtually no mention of animated musicals from our professors until today's lecture notes (Week 4, Day 3: 6/27/2018). So, we skipped over Snow White, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, etc. - all of the groundbreaking animated films of the early years, and we jump right to the animated musicals of the late 80s, 90s, and 2000s? I definitely missed a professorial comment somewhere during the last 3 weeks. (I'm feeling a little confused right now.)

I think it’s because animated musicals weren’t as common back then. Outside of two movies from the Fleischer Brothers, Gulliver’s Travels and Mr. Bug Goes To Town, Disney was the only American studio making animated features throughout the 30s, 40s, and 50s, and even then, they didn’t do many. They only made four animated features in the 1940s (I don’t count the package features besides Fantasia), and even though it had some songs in it, I don’t really consider Bambi to be a musical. Animated features in general are a lot more common now, hence why they’re being covered. Although I do wish we could have covered some of the old animated musicals like Snow White, I can see why they weren’t, since they weren’t as common and are generally considered to be in their own category. I’m hoping TCM and Ball State will consider doing an animated films course sometime in the future.

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I had this thought too. Certainly Disney made animated musical...I  was thinking specifically of Fantasia. And later on The Beatles's Yellow Submarine. I figured animation is a different art form maybe thats why its not covered in this course thoroughly

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1 hour ago, BunnyWhit said:

You didn’t miss it. It wasn’t there.  Head over to the thread “Animated Musical Favorites” to see what some of our  classmates like in the animated world. 

Thanks. I’ve read that particular thread!!

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1 hour ago, Fearless Freep said:

I think it’s because animated musicals weren’t as common back then. Outside of two movies from the Fleischer Brothers, Gulliver’s Travels and Mr. Bug Goes To Town, Disney was the only American studio making animated features throughout the 30s, 40s, and 50s, and even then, they didn’t do many. They only made four animated features in the 1940s (I don’t count the package features besides Fantasia), and even though it had some songs in it, I don’t really consider Bambi to be a musical. Animated features in general are a lot more common now, hence why they’re being covered. Although I do wish we could have covered some of the old animated musicals like Snow White, I can see why they weren’t, since they weren’t as common and are generally considered to be in their own category. I’m hoping TCM and Ball State will consider doing an animated films course sometime in the future.

Unfortunately, it’s hard to ignore the impact Snow White had on the film industry and culture, in general. 

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46 minutes ago, Brittany Ashley said:

I had this thought too. Certainly Disney made animated musical...I  was thinking specifically of Fantasia. And later on The Beatles's Yellow Submarine. I figured animation is a different art form maybe thats why its not covered in this course thoroughly

But they are mentioning the later animated musicals . . . . There appears to be unequal coverage, and the older animated musicals are extraordinary and were game-changers in ways these newer animated musicals have not been. 

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And honestly, I wouldn't even count today's as much of a mention. It was merely a list. I felt like we could have gone into some great depth about the impact animation has had on the musical. Some others on this forum have mentioned Yellow Submarine for instance. And how can we only mention a list of the Animation Renaissance films and the impact they have on musicals without also mentioning the contributions of the creators? Howard Ashman and Alan Menken are largely responsible for helping revitalize not only Disney animation but also the musical in general. I realize that there is so much content and decades of material to cover, but I wish that there would have been more than just a list. 

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8 hours ago, lpetiti said:

And honestly, I wouldn't even count today's as much of a mention. It was merely a list. I felt like we could have gone into some great depth about the impact animation has had on the musical. Some others on this forum have mentioned Yellow Submarine for instance. And how can we only mention a list of the Animation Renaissance films and the impact they have on musicals without also mentioning the contributions of the creators? Howard Ashman and Alan Menken are largely responsible for helping revitalize not only Disney animation but also the musical in general. I realize that there is so much content and decades of material to cover, but I wish that there would have been more than just a list. 

The animated musical would be a great place to consider another aspect of the musical and it’s affects on culture, that being the appeal of such films to a young audience. Perhaps it would be a nice place to talk about introducing youngsters to music and musicals in an effort to start them down a path of a love of the arts. This is particularly useful in our day when so many schools have downsized or phased out their music, drama, and art departments. Some kids have no exposure at all to the arts unless their parents take them to an animated film. If we want to talk about where musicals are going from here, perhaps more than a cursory mention of animateds would be good food for thought. 

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Animated films in general would be a great chance for another course. 

Disney of course would take the threshold, but there are other studio animated features as well like today's DreamWorks.  Films that included animation like MGM with Anchors Aweigh and Disney's Mary Poppins. 

Animation would be a very interesting course. 

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On 6/27/2018 at 7:41 PM, BunnyWhit said:

The animated musical would be a great place to consider another aspect of the musical and it’s affects on culture, that being the appeal of such films to a young audience. Perhaps it would be a nice place to talk about introducing youngsters to music and musicals in an effort to start them down a path of a love of the arts. This is particularly useful in our day when so many schools have downsized or phased out their music, drama, and art departments. Some kids have no exposure at all to the arts unless their parents take them to an animated film. If we want to talk about where musicals are going from here, perhaps more than a cursory mention of animateds would be good food for thought. 

I definitely agree with that. I remember seeing an interview with Alan Menken (I think it was on the Aladdin DVD release). He mentions that he attended a high school musical production and was blown away by how much these guys could really sing. When he asked them about it, they said it was because they grew up on things like The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, and Beauty and the Beast. Often times that is the only exposure to musical kids have nowadways, although I would also credit the popularity of Broadway shows like Dear Evan Hansen and Hamilton for a resurgence in popularity of the musical. In fact, and this is slightly off topic, I remember when the video lecture focused on 1776, and they discussed how odd the subject matter might have been for audiences at the time, I was struck by the omission of any mention of Hamilton, which definitely has some similarities to 1776

Mentioning animated musicals was definitely good food for thought. I just thought it was more of a taste that a foodie would have, rather than an appetizer, and certainly not the whole meal. We definitely should talk about where musicals are going, and animation is a part of that. As much as I think Frozen has been overpopulaized, I consider that to be the beginning of a departure for Disney musicals, because I believe that the composers who wrote that were the ones who wrote The Book of Mormon (someone correct me if I'm wrong). Moana was also a departure because of Lin Manuel Miranda's work...in some instances it definitely didn't sound like a traditional musical. 

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On 6/27/2018 at 7:55 PM, pbm said:

Animated films in general would be a great chance for another course. 

Disney of course would take the threshold, but there are other studio animated features as well like today's DreamWorks.  Films that included animation like MGM with Anchors Aweigh and Disney's Mary Poppins. 

Animation would be a very interesting course. 

I was an animation major in college and we were required to take two courses in animation history (I also minored in film, specifically film history, so I ended up taking way more film history courses). I think that idea would be very interesting and certainly a departure from normal TCM programming. Disney was definitely the leading American animation studio, because it was pretty much the only game in town for a long time. If you're interested in seeing older non-Disney stuff, definitely look at Lotte Reiniger's The Adventures of Prince Achmed, the first feature-length animated movie. Very beautiful!

It would be interesting to not only look at American animation, but also foreign.

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