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I have always enjoyed this movie. I missed it today since it was scheduled during the day but I have seen it several times. I agree that Minelli knows how to make a powerful romantic movie. I guess you could say that he specializes in romance (chick) movies but his films are more substantive then sentimentality.

 

There are numerous poignant elements in this movie. Judy Garland and Robert Walker were to die before their time. The death of Pennsylvania Station in New York as it existed in 1945. The beautiful architecture was demolished in the early 60s leaving only the underground part of the station. The romance of separation caused by the war. I think all of these elements, and more, combined to make this a powerful romantic story.

 

It's interesting to compare Robert Walker in this movie to the similar part that he played in "Since You Went Away" 1944 along with his then current wife Jennifer Jones. I think that he responded with a better performance in The Clock then in this movie. Perhaps because he and Jennifer were separating when they made that movie.

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Yes, the sets are remarkable recreations. I think some shots are of the actual station in New York although I'm not sure. Recreation or not it is modeled after the original Pennsylvania Station which looked to be awe inspiring and worthy as a gateway to a great American city rather then the hole in the ground that it is today.

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The loss of Penn Station was a wake-up call for preservationists in NYC. When Grand Central Station became endangered they did everything they could to work to save that beloved building.

 

Jackie Kennedy was instrumental in bringing attention to the importance of saving the building and helping to ensure that it was preserved for all to enjoy.

 

Pete Hamill has written lovingly of Penn Station and what its loss meant to New Yorkers.

 

Message was edited by: lzcutter because his name is Pete.

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Egypt has THE PYRAMIDS.

 

Rome has THE COLISEUM.

 

America has...STARBUCKS?

 

To paraphrase O.J. Judge Ito..."something wrong here."

I have a vague recollection of that fight as a kid. Penn Station was quite a devastating loss. Soon Yankee Stadium will know the feeling. A damned shame!!

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I'm not familiar with that author but I have a book by Lorraine B. Diehl from American Heritage Press, 1985. The title is "The Late Great Pennsylvania Station". It's a fascinating book. I would love to see someone make a documentary on the history of the building and it's eventual demise. It's worth studying the failures of preservation along with the successful efforts.

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I have always loved this movie as well. It proves once again what an amazingly "modern" actress Garland was. I remember reading the James Agee review of this film in his book, AGEE ON FILM.. He also loved it and recognized what a joyful talent Judy Garland was at this stage in her career and life.

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Stephen,

 

I agree that a docu would be greatr. If it were up to me I would have Pete Hamill front and center talking about the significance of Penn Station and what it meant not only to New Yorkers but to the rest of us as well. Of its loss and what it meant to New Yorkers and how it galvanized them into being more preservation minded.

 

His writings about the New York that he grew up with and came of age with are lyrical and I recommend those compilation books of those columns to everyone that cares about the we we once were (and it matters not if we were in New York, his writings, while NYC-centric, could be about cities through-out America as they changed over towards the end of the 20th Century.).

 

http://tinyurl.com/6zzsn7

 

http://tinyurl.com/557oqy (My personal favortie)

 

http://tinyurl.com/6b87s8 (for Sinatra fans)

 

CineMaven,

 

I think you would love these books.

 

For the record, I am not (nor have ever been and I don't mean that in a bad way) a New Yorker but these books make me wish I could have been and yet remind us that we are connected by the history of where we grew up and came of age be it NYC, Los Angeles, Las Vegas or many cities in between.

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http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?messageID=7956905

 

 

That is the thread Ben Hur. I meant to say the backdrop for the stairs..sorry. Not sure why the photos are there twice. I think originally they were not showing at all. Strange. Hope you can see them ok..here a close up of the writing, most of it. I was being rushed by my husband..so I didn't get it all, sorry.

 

http://links.pictures.aol.com/pic/a600Zm08eG7sonryOkggHD39V7f9BkEh*smSv4xQp5Fd3Ig=_l.jpg

 

I have more pics and the UN painted scenes from North by Northwest..

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Micketeeze...thank you for the YouTube Clip and book citations. It felt like reading an autopsy the de-struction of Penn Station. I have very very vague memories of it. Geez. As I've said, other countries have pyramids; we have Starbucks.

 

lzcutter: "For the record, I am not (nor have ever been and I don't mean that in a bad way) a New Yorker but these books make me wish I could have been and yet remind us that we are connected by the history of where we grew up and came of age be it NYC, Los Angeles, Las Vegas or many cities in between."

 

I guess everyone has city-pride (or hubris). But you have so very eloquently stated it...what shapes us whether we were raised in the big city or the hinterlands.

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I'm not familiar with that author but I have a book by Lorraine B. Diehl from American Heritage Press, 1985. The title is "The Late Great Pennsylvania Station". It's a fascinating book. I would love to see someone make a documentary on the history of the building and it's eventual demise. It's worth studying the failures of preservation along with the successful efforts.

 

I heartily recommend the book "Celluloid Skyline," by James Sanders.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000OM6X5K/ref=dp_olp_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1212546724&sr=1-5

 

http://www.amazon.com/Celluloid-Skyline-New-York-Movies/dp/0375710272/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1212546724&sr=1-1

 

The large-format book is an in-depth look at the way cities, especially New York, have been and are portrayed in the Hollywood film. An architect by trade, Sanders's text, along with copious, excellent photos, explores the cultural pull urban America has on its mythology -- the movies.

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