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34 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

One could say the Production Code ended thanks to us Boomers.    Sad how clueless and closed minded, that person is on the history of American movies.

And one would only need to look at a list of films released from the late '50s through the '60s to see how many remakes there were (Hint: it was a lot).

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15 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

And one would only need to look at a list of films released from the late '50s through the '60s to see how many remakes there were (Hint: it was a lot).

Correct;   this falls under my 'one generation' guideline;   that each generation likes to take a prior generations source-material and adapt it to the actors\star of the current generation.     E.g.   You Can't Run Away from It;  this 1956 'remake' of It Happened One Night with fairly-new-on-the-scene-wonder-boy Jack Lemmon (but sadly the film starred a much too old for the part, June Allyson).     This film doesn't compare to the Gable\Corbert\Carpa 1934 pre-code film,  but as you know that isn't the point.

(oh, and Allyson was also in a "remake" of The Women;  The Opposite Sex,  also released in 1956).

 

     

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On ‎2‎/‎25‎/‎2019 at 1:23 PM, LawrenceA said:

And one would only need to look at a list of films released from the late '50s through the '60s to see how many remakes there were (Hint: it was a lot).

Exactly. It's something that's been going on throughout the entire history of cinema. As innovations have come into the industry (sound, Technicolor, widescreen, stereophonic sound, CGI, etc.) it's made sense for filmmakers to tap back into what has proven to be popular and update it with new techniques (and new social perspectives). Despite what one notorious "naysayer" feels about it, Spielberg will be able to draw both on his many years of experience as a filmmaker and on all the technical advances since 1961. Spielberg is part of the generation of directors who came with a deep respect for past filmmakers (including Robert Wise, I'm sure) already in place and an eye to where they could take the lessons they had learned from them. That's no guarantee of success, naturally, but I'd say it bodes well for a new West Side Story.

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  • 1 month later...

See, I'm personally alright with this. I mean, it's Steven Spielberg, after all, one of the greatest film directors of all time. And he's purposefully making it so that the cast isn't whitewashed, which I respect quite a bit. However, the original West Side Story is one of, if not the, greatest movie musical of all time. I'm not sure that even Spielberg himself could live up to how incredible the original film was. But I have the same attitude with this movie that I have about the Disney live action remakes: if they're actually going to try to make a good movie and not simply make a movie for money, then I will be happy with it. If it's just a pointless cash grab that doesn't even try to be good, that's when I draw the line.

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6 hours ago, animaldoctor said:

See, I'm personally alright with this. I mean, it's Steven Spielberg, after all, one of the greatest film directors of all time. And he's purposefully making it so that the cast isn't whitewashed, which I respect quite a bit. However, the original West Side Story is one of, if not the, greatest movie musical of all time. I'm not sure that even Spielberg himself could live up to how incredible the original film was. But I have the same attitude with this movie that I have about the Disney live action remakes: if they're actually going to try to make a good movie and not simply make a movie for money, then I will be happy with it. If it's just a pointless cash grab that doesn't even try to be good, that's when I draw the line.

Good post. Yes, maybe it's not about trying to make a better version. All they have to do is make a good version. It can function as a gateway to the original. There's no reason why people can't enjoy and appreciate both versions.

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Good post. Yes, maybe it's not about trying to make a better version. All they have to do is make a good version. It can function as a gateway to the original. There's no reason why people can't enjoy and appreciate both versions.

Exactly! The original is incredible, but that doesn't mean the new one can't be in its own way.

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  • 6 months later...
On 6/30/2018 at 8:29 PM, BreeInGilbertAZ said:

As much as the message of WSS is still pertinent, today, it will be an outright DISASTER to remake it. It won TEN Oscars! How do you top THAT?

You're spot-on here, BreeInGilbertAZ!  I could not have said it any better myself!  Way to go!  Thanks.

I'll also add that I've already seen pictures of the cast for Spielberg and Kushner's upcoming reboot/remake of the 1961 film version of West Side Story, as well as some other photos and I really don't like the look of what I've seen so far.  I've always been against remakes of older classic films, especially something such as West Side Story, but what I've seen of the upcoming reboot/remake of it has re-enforced my decision to vote my pocketbook and boycott (inotherwords, not go to see it!) the reboot/remake of the 1961 film version of West Side Story when it comes out in the movie theatres at around Christmastime of next year.

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