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mrschips24

The Academy Awards' Forgetfullness

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I was chagrined to read this week that the Oscars producers only deem 15-20 of the over 400 recently deceased Academy members to be important enough to remembered during their upcoming broadcast.

 

Army Archerd mentions in his Variety column that the family of Penny Singleton(After the Thin Man, Boy Meets Girl,numerous Blondie movies, and more)was saddened to learn that she would be left out of their planned tribute, along with numerous others. After all, she only worked in the motion picture arts for 60 years.

 

I realize that there are enormous commercial pressures associated with an international broadcast of these proportions, and that an exceptional number of megastars passed away this last year, but couldn't they read the less prominent names during the non-broadcast part of the Academy presentations just as a public acknowledgement of their contributions and loss? Perhaps this jettisoning of the very mention of many veterans' names is part of an overall trend since even in 2002, Dorothy McGuire's name was omitted from the memorial tribute--while the relatively insignificant contribution of pop star Aaliyah was remembered.

 

Since the Academy for practical, (and commercial) reasons, chooses to forget some veteran craftsmen, how about if TCM considers a longer version of their annual In Memoriam spot? TCM always produces a graceful and touching appreciation of those who have died at year's end. Any chance that they might do a longer one at the end of this year or possibly as part of next year's 31 Days of Oscar?

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I totally agree with you, Mrs. Chips! We've arrived at a time when there will be a very large number of actors and actresses who have passed away during the year, and to leave any of them out of Tributes is very wrong. I don't know how the Academy Awards people will deal with this, or even if they can, but I do think that TCM could put together at least a "1/2-hour Special" to cover everyone at the end of each year, which would include everyone who made a significant contribution to films, and not necessarily just the better-known "stars".

 

ML

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mschips it has always annoyed me when the Academy Awards leaves out important supporting players in their yearly tribute to the late stars. If they would sick to their guns and limit those long boring speeches I believe they would have the time to show them all since it only takes a few seconds to flash their picture on the screen i.e. Penny Singleton.

By the tonight at 8:00 on A&E is a two hour biography of the Oscar which should be interesting.

 

Mongo

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I just caught a few minutes of the tribute to actors who've passed on during the SAG awards this evening...it was nicely done and Penny Singleton was included, along with many others. It's not the Oscars, but it is something.

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I watched a Blondie film recently and was surprised at Penny Singleton's charisma. The Academy seems to be stuck up. Only the "important" dead people can go through.

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I also watched the SAG awards and their tribute to the stars that passed away in 2003. We lost an impressive group of performers:

 

Katharine Hepburn

Rand Brooks (GWTW)

Les Tremayne (character actor)

Madlyn Rhue

Earl Hindman (behind the fence in

Ellen Drew

Gene Anthony Ray (Fame)

Wendy Hiller

Dorothy Louden (Broadway star)

Grahame Jarvis (Mary Hartman)

Fred Rogers (Mr. Rogers)

Bob Keeshan (Capt. Kangaroo)

Janice Rule

Art Carney

Jonathan Brandis

Suzy Parker

Fred Berry (Rerun on "What's Happening")

Uta Hagen

Jack Elan

Julie Parrish

Gordon Jump (Big Guy on WKRP)

Jack Paar

Florence Stanley (TV series "Fish")

William Marshall ("Blacula")

Anthony Caruso

Donald O'Connor

Larry Hovis

Robert Stack

Giselle Mackenzie

Horst Bucholz

Michael Jeter ("The Green Mile" w/the mouse)

Buddy Ebsen

Hope Lange

Buddy Hackett

Ann Miller

Johnny Cash

Charles Bronson

Penny Singleton (Blondie)

Davis Hemmings

Martha Scott

Alan Bates

Lynne Thigpen (The District)

Hume Cronyn

Jeanne Crain

John Ritter

Gregory Hines

Bob Hope

Gregory Peck

Frederick Coffin (supporting actor)

Kellie Waymire (TVs "Wolf Lake")

 

Congratulations to SAG for letting us remember all these wonderful performers.

 

Mongo

 

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Correction:

 

Earl Hindman was always behind the fence in TVs "Home Improvement".

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Correction:

 

Earl Hindman was the actor behind the fence in "Home Improvement".

The correct name is actor David Hemmings.

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I also wish to complement SAG's "Tributes" feature at last night's SAG Awards. It was very nicely done, and certainly included a lot...a lot...of people that I wasn't aware until last night had passed on during the past year. I didn't time how long this special feature lasted (maybe about 8 minutes?), but I certainly can't see why TCM couldn't find as much time or more, and do a more thorough job with it's Tributes at the end of this year. I still find myself humming this year's song though(smile).

 

And, was anyone else as stunned as I was when Johnny Depp took the Best Actor Award? We really haven't been talking much at all about the Oscar's. How come? ML

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I agree that the Academy should show some respect and have a little class, and pay tribute to ALL of the stars that passed. What a shame that they aren't including Penny Singleton, who was such a great character actress. I am so sick of Hollywood and their bull-sh**. Just look at the way they're treating Mel Gibson over his movie about Christ. They act as though he's lost his marbles and will now be black-balled because of it. Hollywood is only interested in themselves and the moment, and whatever makes money - what? An old star died? Well I don't receive royalties off of their work, so who cares? That's their attitude - no respect for their elders who came before them and paved the way for what they (Hollywood) is now enjoying. Just look at the way they "remake" or better yet "butcher" classic films. If any of them had respect for their craft, they would pay homage to the classics, instead of trying to copy them and therefore tarnish their image. And more importantly, Hollywood is now just a big political platform for the radical liberals that run it. Farewell to the days of the old Hollywood class and style - which means farewell to any respect for those in the industry that have passed.

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Yes ML, I was just as surprised as everyone else including Sean Penn when Johnny Depp won the SAG award for best actor. I believe he didn't show up for the awards thinking that Penn would win the award.

In any event from what I understand Depp did give an unusal performance in "Pirates of the Caribbean" which surprised the masses. Now we have see who gets the Oscar.

 

Mongo

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I was just browsing here-(although to quote a line from a Rodney Dangerfield flick "I don't look like a Browser!")

But what exactly are you fans speaking of? SAG-Awards & It's annual death roll? I saw it & as 1 noted, they are like the G. Globes-(pretenders to the thrown of the ACADEMY!) Matter of fact, SAG Awards are only 9yrs. old!

At least the Globes have been around since 1943. But, don't worry about them leaving just about any celeb out, come next Sunday-(OSCAR night) On the other-hand, I was really wondering just whom & how do they cite the final image/star that passed away, in what must have been a record year for cinematic deaths!? It'll be between: *Gregory Peck-(1916-2003)-(P.S. when he went last summer, it really seemed to have opened up somekind of whirlwind? *Katharine Hepburn-(1907-2003) was next & of course 15 time OSCAR-host: Bob Hope-(1903-2003)-(I personally think they will end it's roll-call w/*Kate! We shall see?) & I wrote an article on here quite awhile back-(matter of fact when Hope passed away) Ed McMahon gave me & hopefully A.M.P.A.S. board members the idea-(although it may also be in the pretty-currupt hands of Johnny Grant, as well? Being he's kind of the head of Hollywood Chamber of Commerce-(this man of course has his own STAR directly at foot of his office-squeezed in between "Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel," & another bldg. Nope, no ego on his behalf!?)

It's such a marvelous concept, it should not even be a question? A Bob Hope statue as "MC," in front of the new "Kodak-Theatre" aka: "Hollywood & Highland!"

WHAT DO YOU CINEPHILES THINK??? Thank You

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To mongo, -(& Mary Lou, keep up the ****-star wurk, as *Jim woulda' phrased-it!) & to anyone on here-(Mongo, I know you likely hold record for most posts',etc. So if you ever even see her on here, PLEASE DROP ME A LINE IMMEDIATELY!? I'm in constant contact with that superb lady above-(ML) But am veeery-concerned about another lady! Her new handle is: mypalspencer. Used to be: cocktailsany1. Name is Holly & resides-(unfortunately for her, I've had quite enough myself of big cities,etc.) NYC-(Brooklyn, to be exact & as we all know, it's not exactly Ralph Kramden-"Honeymooners," territory anymore, unfortunately! And believe me Hollywood is not far-behind.) But to Mongo, if you'd like to just chat on anything OSCAR-(my predictions-I'll post my final predix on here as well. & what I almost enjoy most. It's history & trivia,etc.) Drop me a line at: spencer64@ij.net & I am at present also writing for a kind of new OSCAR website: oscartalk.com-(classicsfilmfan>ML, certainly knows of it & is also getting very involved in it as well & I have to say, doing a terrific job at it!!!) See ya all later J.S.

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Spencer, I think that Katharine Hepburn, Gregory Peck, Bob Hope and other legends will endure, perhaps not in a statue, but definitely as long as film survives. To be honest, they don't need recognition--the small fry like Penny Singleton and all the others that the SAG awards took the time to appreciate during their ceremony deserve a moment as well.

 

I usually watch the Oscars and enjoy them as entertainment--but they're just another marketing tool to my eyes--an occasionally glittering and venerable marketing tool, but one nonetheless. The AMPAS archives and support for film scholars and makers---this unglamourous, off-camera work is where the organization proves it is still vital. Perhaps this work could never be maintained without the dog and pony show of the Oscars.

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I personally feel the Academy Awards never give the proper tribute to stars of years ago (and not just the recently departed ones), though I LOVED last year's Oscars with many past winners (de Havilland, J. Jones, etc.). Doris Day (& many others) deserves an honorary Oscar, she was in many good films & #1 box-office female star in the late 50s - early 60s! Old Hollywood deserves much more respect.

 

moviejoe - Hollywood has been re-making films since early days! Warner Bros. remade or partially remade MANY of their hit films. Films like HOLIDAY (1938), THE MALTESE FALCON (1941), BEAU GESTE (1939), GASLIGHT (1944), AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER etc. are all remakes of successful films.

 

Also, who are these Hollywood people saying they will black-ball Mel Gibson? It would be wrong if they said that, but I haven't heard any Hollywood person say they would. Only negative things I've heard are from some Jewish groups, some TV/print news people, & some religious experts. Compared to TV news hosts, Hollywood doesn't have much of a soapbox. The TV news hosts on CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, Fox News, (& even talk radio) are on ALL day, EVERY day. What Hollywood star has that kind of exposure? What Hollywood star is on every day? Cable news: Talk, talk, talk; Truth & lies nonstop.

 

Did you see Gibson interviewed by Diane Sawyer? He has an anger problem. On edge every second. She didn't say hardly anything, but he looked like he was going to explode! He reminds me of James Woods, Frank Sinatra, & Alec Baldwin (& others). By the way, the only reviews of the film I saw so far are from Ebert & Roeper. They loved it & said they didn't feel it was anti-Semitic.

 

I remember Arnold Schwarzenegger saying that Hollywood people get such a bad rap but in reality they are very, very generous & give SO much money to charities & the needy, etc.

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catcarson - I understand your point that Hollywood has been re-making films forever, but today's Hollywood does not do justice to the films that they remake. They are usually a poor imitation - a case in point would be "Mr. Deeds" with Adam Sandler. Now who's idea was it to remake a classic Frank Capra movie starring the incredible Gary Cooper with Adam Sandler in the lead? At least when Hollywood remade films in the past, it was usually done by the same studio, and usually on the same kind of scale with the same kind of quality that the original had. Hollywood of today doesn't do that.

 

And as for Mel Gibson, there were two articles in the New York papers that spoke of how Hollywood is not pleased with Gibson and the religious messages that his film is sending. Hollywood worships money, not God, and therefore it upsets some people in the Hollywood community, especially the liberals. But as I said, it was only something I read in the paper, which is not always true. Maybe Hollywood will be thrilled with his movie - I don't know.

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Moviejoe, if "The Passion of the Christ" turns out to be a somewhat unexpected hit--and anticipated attendance for the first showings does seem to be rather high--perhaps we can probably expect "The Passion of the Christ, Part Deux" any time within the next year & Mel Gibson will probably be able be quite welcome to call the shots using studio money.

 

Who knows, the explicit, violent detail depicting the crucifixion in this movie may be one of the few ways to get the attention of audiences in our desensitized time. I wonder if it will really have any positive effect on individuals or moviemakers? I'm not really trying to be cynical or irreverent--it's just how moviemaking seems to work. Like ya said, joe--at the Academy Awards as elsewhere, it's all about the $$$.

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Well, there's good news and bad news regarding the Oscars' In Memoriam segment.

 

The Good News: According to the BBC, the original number of names to be acknowledged for their contributions has been raised from 20 to 31 people, with Bob Hope, Gregory Peck and Katharine Hepburn to receive separate segments.

 

The Bad News: Penny Singleton is still not among the select few. Basing their assessment on the impact of the careers of the deceased on current filmmaking, director of Nazi propaganda Leni Reifenstahl will be among the names chosen by the Academy. This is likely to give some observers pause, don't you think?

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Leni Reifenstahl should probably be remembered by AMPAS during the Oscars. She was a pioneer among women as an actress and as a director. Technically her work in "Olympia" and "Triumph of the Will" were extraordinary and have influenced film to this day. Unfortunately, her moral blindness regarding her role in perpetuating Nazism reveals that she was also an extraordinarily flawed as well as talented person.

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Hey, if Hollywood can honor Roaman Polanski, they can honor Leni. I've seen "Triumph Of The Will", and a film in which she acted("mountain play", or something like that,those films were called),and they were awesome.

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Perhaps this jettisoning of the very mention of many veterans' names is part of an overall trend since even in 2002, Dorothy McGuire's name was omitted from the memorial tribute--while the relatively insignificant contribution of pop star Aaliyah was remembered.

 

 

So, you'd like to have seen Aaliyah's name taken out of the tribute?

 

You aren't the first person to complain about that, actually. Peggy Lee's name was left out that same year

and her relatives registered a big public complaint in which they specifically targeted Aaliyah for getting included while Lee didn't. Very petty and really rather nasty way to go about expressing their feelings, to denigrate another dead actor, especially one who died at, what, 21? 22? No, she didn't make as big a contribution as Singleton, McGuire or Lee--she didn't have a chance to--and no doubt that's one reason why she did end up in the tribute: dying at that age is a lot more tragic.

 

Furthermore if there are 400 recently dead Academy members, obviously they can't all be included, no matter how devoted they ALL were to their work.

 

Personally I think the whole In Memoriam segment is a bad idea and ought to be dropped. It's a turn-off to hear

people applauding wildly for one name and then barely hearing so much as a cough for the next.

 

 

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