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MissGoddess
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Of course I remember you, Kathy! I'm so glad you're back and like Mr Grey said (he makes

sense OCCASIONALLY) you have nothing to apologize for. Just pull up a chair in front

of our pot belly stove and stay a spell any time you feel like it. :)

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> It's worth a lot. Thank you--and I think there were others who posted there that also tried to maintain the spirit of that thread to the best of their ability too--but I really am having a hard time here because I can't take too much more of this folks. (I only like other people's drama on tv--can't handle my own too well.) :-) Plus I feel like this has turned into the Kathy show--not my intent at all--Please--let's give Miss Goddess back her thread- How about talking about my favorite movie of all time--since I can talk about it now that I am no longer anonymous....The Quiet Man. John Wayne is one of my all time favorite actors Maureen O'Hara--all time favorite actress too (so now you know why I started the thread about her over in the Favorites) and this film is my very favorite film wth the two of them together. What a combo!

 

Not "my thread" at all, it's a corner of TCM for anyone to cozy up to and talk about whatever

they wish or just sit and not talk like that big, tall Quiet Man. Very near the top of my movie

"wish list" is that this movie gets a real, good 'scrubbing' and a pristine, restored dvd release

worth of its status as perhaps the most beloved film John Ford or John Wayne ever made, and

the most adored movie about Ireland.

 

quietman1.jpg

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There is simplicity and then there is complexity. It would be nice if life was full of simplicity but it's mostly full of complexity, especially when it comes to people. It would be so much easier to just place a white hat on this person and a black one on this one and be done with it. There's not much thinking or emotional investment involved in that. The best way to rally people is to simplify things for them through oversimplification. But darn that "grey." It always gets in the way.

 

Will you please stick to the pony you traded for and stop trying to switch horses in midstream? (Sorry I just came from a screening of The Wild Bunch) You just got through saying movies don't have to reflect real life for you to appreciate them so I don't understand the above paragraph at all.

 

I'll switch you!

 

It is very true, I don't need a reflection of real life to enjoy a movie. I can suspend my beliefs in the name of entertainment. My simplicity-complexity diatribe has to do with how I think many people want to lessen thought by trying to make people and situations clearcut when I believe that is rarely the case. There's usually more to a story and a person. This is what I find to be the most interesting in both fiction and reality. It's not that I NEED complexity in film to enjoy it, but I certainly prefer it.

 

I feel drama is at its best with conflict, particularly internal conflict. I like questions like, "what should I do?" The "black and white" view doesn't ask, "what should I do," that much. It's more like, "how should I do it?" That's where the drama with "black and white" usually lies. In otherwords, "black and white" knows the answer to the question whereas "grey" doesn't always.

 

The Wild Bunch?! You actually saw The Wild Bunch on the big screen? Wow! I'm shocked and impressed. How come I feel a disapproving commentary forthcoming? I sense the word, "nihilistic." Robert Ryan is wearin' the "white hat" in that picture. I love his character.

 

Yours truly, "Toddy"

 

"Toddy" is saying "yours truly" to "Cabman Gray"? Has the world gone mad? :P

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I feel drama is at its best with conflict, particularly internal conflict. I like questions like, "what should I do?" The "black and white" view doesn't ask, "what should I do," that much. It's more like, "how should I do it?" That's where the drama with "black and white" usually lies. In otherwords, "black and white" knows the answer to the question whereas "grey" doesn't always.

 

OK I can understand that better.

 

I just posted my "nihilstic" review of Sam's movie (which contained more "red" than black, white

or grey) in the Western Gallery.

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I just posted my "nihilstic" review of Sam's movie (which contained more "red" than black, white

or grey) in the Western Gallery.

 

:D

 

I just read your words in your Gallery. You must have been in a good mood or tipsy or both. I cannot believe you sort of liked The Wild Bunch. That's a film where we are pulling for the banditos. The bad guys have a code and many of the "good" guys don't. I do love "Deke Thornton" (Robert Ryan).

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I just read your words in your Gallery. You must have been in a good mood or tipsy or both. I cannot believe you sort of liked The Wild Bunch. That's a film where we are pulling for the banditos. The bad guys have a code and many of the "good" guys don't. I do love "Deke Thornton" (Robert Ryan).

 

I was prepared for all that so my expectations were low. I wanted mainly to enjoy

the performances and I did that and more. I think watching "Pike Bishop" and

"Deke Thornton" also gave me the kind of pleasure a scientist must feel when catching

a glimpse of a rare, endangered species in its natural habitat. It was all so very different

to what I'm used to living in a city like New York, and I enjoyed the trip even if it did feel

as though I'd stumbled into a barracks or a locker room or some other exclusively male

territory. But then, that too has its charms for me. :)

 

I will add that I didn't really sense anything "nihilistic" about the movie, or maybe I don't

really comprehend the meaning of the word. It was excessively violent, I spent a great

deal of time covering my eyes, but perhaps because of the milieu it did not seem out

of place.

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I was prepared for all that so my expectations were low. I wanted mainly to enjoy

the performances and I did that and more.

 

Very good! I thought you'd really like Robert Ryan in the film but I wasn't sure about the rest.

 

I think watching "Pike Bishop" and "Deke Thornton" also gave me the kind of pleasure a scientist must feel when catching a glimpse of a rare, endangered species in its natural habitat. It was all so very different to what I'm used to living in a city like New York, and I enjoyed the trip

 

I love the setting and the "world" of The Wild Bunch.

 

I thought NYC was known for its wild bunches, non? :)

 

even if it did feel as though I'd stumbled into a barracks or a locker room or some other exclusively male territory. But then, that too has its charms for me. :)

 

I cannot believe I just read that. I'm shocked! :P

 

I will add that I didn't really sense anything "nihilistic" about the movie, or maybe I don't

really comprehend the meaning of the word.

 

I always take "nihilistic" to mean a world that is lawless and amoral; one with a bleak outlook.

 

It was excessively violent, I spent a great deal of time covering my eyes, but perhaps because of the milieu it did not seem out of place.

 

I thought you would be turned off by the violence at the beginning of the film and then dislike the film henceforth. The extreme violence basically bookends the film. It's the usage of slow motion that amplifies the violence, thusly turning off many. But I find the slow motion to be very impactful. I find the violence to be all the more painful because of it.

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I thought you'd really like Robert Ryan in the film but I wasn't sure about the rest.

 

He was magnficent. I longed, though, for a scene between him and Bill Holden. If I could

ask Peckinpah anything about that movie, it would be why Pike and Deke never confronted each

other.

 

I thought you'd really like Robert Ryan in the film but I wasn't sure about the rest.

 

There's bunches of wildness but the resemblance ends there.

 

I thought you would be turned off by the violence at the beginning of the film and then dislike the film henceforth. The extreme violence basically bookends the film. It's the usage of slow motion that amplifies the violence, thusly turning off many. But I find the slow motion to be very impactful. I find the violence to be all the more painful because of it.

 

I covered my eyes during both blood baths so I saw only glimpses. I can't watch that

kind of stuff.

 

I am beginning to get a sense of Peckinpah as a director. He has a very strong "energy" to

use a loathsomely overused word, but I don't know how else to put it. He manages to get

something from his guts right onto the screen directly that I feel in the few movies of his I've seen.

And it's more than just the visceral energy from the violence. He's an interesting character and

a good director, I think. I don't mean to imply I really like his movies, but I don't dislike them

out of hand either. He's spawned an awful lot of extremely bad imitators, though, I must say.

 

Well, I'm off to dreamland where I hope I won't be followed by Pike and his gang with their

long guns. :)

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Hi April--thanks for remembering me, but with all the folks you talk to, I am still amazed anyone does! :-) It is nice to be the real me again, though I have sort of been enjoying my new nickname (Ro)! But it's really still the same old me. PS--in case anyone cares "Rohanaka" is actually a mixture of my husband (Roland) and my daughter (Hannah) and me.

 

Very near the top of my movie "wish list" is that this movie gets a real, good 'scrubbing' and a pristine, restored dvd release worth of its status as perhaps the most beloved film John Ford or John Wayne ever made, and the most adored movie about Ireland.

 

I think that would be great if the Quiet Man could get such treatment. I have a VHS copy that my husband gave me 15 years ago--the first birthday gift he ever gave me after we got married--and it has an anniversary "extra" tacked on to the end of it with a lot of interesting information about the actors, and the film and how it was made, etc.

 

It is just one of those movies that I could watch all the time and not get sick of it --But I don't because everyone else around here might complain! The first time I saw it was back in the late 80's. As old and fogey-ish as I am, I can't believe I never saw it sooner. I HAD however seen E.T. (both in the theaters and on tape)--it was the VERY first VHS tape I ever bought way back when it first started getting popular to "rent" a VCR--who in their right mind ever came up with that idea???

 

But I digress--The first time I saw The Quiet Man I jumped up out of my chair because I finally figured out the name of the John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara movie that was being played in the middle of ET!!! It was such a happy moment for me (I take pleasure in the simple things!) :-)

 

I had seen that goofy little space alien switching channels on his TV at least a couple dozen times before but could never figure out what in the world that scene was from when Elliot got to give that little blonde girl a kiss while all the frogs hopped away to freedom. It used to bug me to pieces because I have always enjoyed the Duke and Ms OHara together in movies and I can't believe I never knew about this one until I was almost 30!! (this was way back before you could look up such stuff on the internet)

 

For all you youngin's out there--back in the olden days before all this fancy computer stuff--we used to just have to sit and wait til we finally figured out these little mysteries for ourselves!! It's nice to be living in more modern times if only so I can "Google" when I can't find the answer I am looking for!! Ha! :-)

 

Thanks for the pic--I love that scene in the rain.

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"The Quiet Man" is a great movie and I like it very much as you do. It's a great cast. So many wonderful moments.

 

I can't imagine any other woman playing opposite Wayne in this one. She has the requisite toughness and gentleness to make the relationship honest and equal.

 

Visually it's a lovely film. Great color except the most recent DVD of it makes the colors a little too vibrant. She seem almost unreal in some sense. It does have a commentary by O'Hara so that is a real bonus. I have the same VHS you have and I've kept mine as it's a good copy and the colors aren't quite so overdone.

 

Just keep in mind if the there is ever another scuffle at the boards the "Marquis of Queensberry" rules must be observed at all times.

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Howdy, Quiet Gal -- Oh Mr Grey-- (no longer fighting the "a") --now you have made me cry. (and I am not just saying that). I really did not think anyone would remember me because you guys have had a whole year's worth of people to talk with. (which is also one of the reasons I decided to stay "quiet" so long.)

 

Ohh, it's always so wonderful to meet old friends again. There's no need to be shy. JackieF was very correct in saying you will find many kindhearted folks around here. I'm doing my best to balance out the kindness. :D So do you wish for me to TELL you how WRONG you are for liking "black and white" movies now? ;) I guess I better save that for the Invisible Butterscotch Woman. That gal loves to watch trashy flicks. You better talk to her, because she refuses to listen to me.

 

Not to mention the fact I made my exit with this big "I have to leave" speech--(too embarassing to think about right now).

 

I thought your "speech" was heartfelt. It was lovely.

 

For pete's sake where did you find that link--I think I only got one or two replies on it and I figured it was long dead and buried. Thanks for the memory.

 

That was one of the most creative threads this board has ever seen. I was really impressed by it.

 

Howdy, Loud Gal -- I thought you'd really like Robert Ryan in the film but I wasn't sure about the rest.

 

He was magnficent. I longed, though, for a scene between him and Bill Holden. If I could

ask Peckinpah anything about that movie, it would be why Pike and Deke never confronted each

other.

 

You're right (blech!), a scene between "Pike" and "Deke" would have been very powerful. Maybe Peckinpah chose not to because "Deke" was always chasing his past and "Pike" was always running from his "future/fate."

 

I covered my eyes during both blood baths so I saw only glimpses. I can't watch that

kind of stuff.

 

You are much too cute. I also think you're a "peeker." :)

 

I am beginning to get a sense of Peckinpah as a director. He has a very strong "energy" to

use a loathsomely overused word, but I don't know how else to put it. He manages to get

something from his guts right onto the screen directly that I feel in the few movies of his I've seen.

And it's more than just the visceral energy from the violence. He's an interesting character and

a good director, I think. I don't mean to imply I really like his movies, but I don't dislike them

out of hand either. He's spawned an awful lot of extremely bad imitators, though, I must say.

 

The only Peckinpah films I have seen are The Wild Bunch, The Getaway, Straw Dogs, and The Osterman Weekend. I like the first three very much. Peckinpah is a VERY "male" director.

 

I agree with you (death sentence), Peckinpah directs from the gut and he doesn't hold back. He's not big on subtlety. He's violent to the viewer; he attacks us.

 

Well, I'm off to dreamland where I hope I won't be followed by Pike and his gang with their

long guns. :)

 

:D Maybe James Coburn will save you. If you see Coop and Coop's Girl, you better not look too long.

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Miss G,

 

Congrats on seeing *The Bunch* on the big screen. It really is one of Peckinpah's best. I love his elegiac looks at the ending of the Old West. This is the flip side to *Ride the High Country* in many ways.

 

When I was younger (proving once again that I am older than dirt), only the European version had the flashback scene that hinted at Deke and Pike's friendship and how it resulted in Pike's getting shot.

 

It wasn't until the early 1980s that that version was finally shown in the States. We were able to get it for a screening at SC along with Peckinpah, LQ Jones and Ernie Borgnine who all came along to talk about the making of the film.

 

Shortly after that, it premiered on the Z channel here in Los Angeles (a great early forerunner to TCM) and the long, original director's cut started coming out of the shadows.

 

With all the pieces put back in (I think the majority, including the flashback scene had been excised by WBros when they recut the film for time after it's original release) it truly is a magnificent story of friendship, betrayal and the code that some men live by.

 

Congrats again on getting to see it on the big screen.

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That was one of the most creative threads this board has ever seenwas really impressed by it.

 

Grey Guy--I looked back over that thread last night before I signed off of here--you were an audience of one!! Maybe it will be one of those things where I will only be famous after I am long dead and buried. :-)

 

And PS-- although I prefer the black and white--I do like some gray themes in films by the way--just don't let it get around!

 

Movieman-- Marquis of Queensberry HA!! I shoulda thought of that one myself-we are always saying that around our house!! There's a lot of great one-liners in that movie. :-)

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Howdy, Ramblin' Ro -- I looked back over that thread last night before I signed off of here--you were an audience of one!! Maybe it will be one of those things where I will only be famous after I am long dead and buried. :)

 

:D I enjoyed the show.

 

And PS-- although I prefer the black and white--I do like some gray themes in films by the way--just don't let it get around!

 

Only if you promise not to tell Butterscotchy that I like some sappy romance movies.

 

PS--in case anyone cares "Rohanaka" is actually a mixture of my husband (Roland) and my daughter (Hannah) and me.

 

That's beautiful! You definitely have your priorities in order. Hannah is a darling name. She's sweet both forwards and backwards, coming and going.

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*Hello Lafitte--Nice to meet you*

 

Hello *Rohanaka,* and the same. I feel I already ?know? you having read so many of your fine posts. (I recently read how you came to compose your name. Very creative. Up until knowing that, I thought you might be an Egyptian Queen ;) )

 

(I hope you don?t mind if I answer you in the manner of the inimitable Frank Grimes Torture style, something I am trying to learn but will never master, probably to my own benefit as well as to the relief of others)

 

*---( I warn you now-I speak no French*

 

I consider myself warned and neither do I. Or at least not that much. I am not able to watch a French movie without subtitles, for instance. Bonjour, Brigitte Bardot, and ooh-la-la are my favorite words. But I took a lot in college and can hold simple conversations. I can read Zola (who is relatively easy) but not Balzac (who is not). I write French sentences from time to time for Mademoiselle *Butterscotchgreer* who responds in English and understands every word I write. She is very smart. I have written in French to *Mr Grimes* who claims not to know French but who answers me in French with words I don?t even know! Sacrebleu! He is also very smart.

 

*?beyond the words French Toast or perhaps French Dressing or French Fries. .so will have to converse in English--please don't rat me out to any politicians because I certainly don't want to start THAT sort of war on this site!!)*

 

Not to worry. I don?t want them to come get me either. So far they have not changed the names of those Frenchie foods so we are in luck. If they change the name to Victory Toast, will it taste the same? But we won?t go there. BTW, English is just fine. That?s my language of choice, that is, when I?m not fracturing French.

 

*I have read some of your other posts--sometimes I feel like I am eavesdropping because I have no idea what you folks are talking about.*

 

Not having an idea what I?m talking about is perfectly understandable. The other folks should be no problem. And oh, you make me laugh when you say you feel like your eavesdropping. That?s exactly the word I used over on the *Frank Grimes Torture Thread* not long ago and *Frank* roundly reproached me by saying something to the effect that eavesdropping is not allowed but that it was necessary instead to PARTICIPATE. Which, of course, was a way of welcoming. I?m sure you?ve already noticed how cordial and genuinely supportive he is in this regard. That?s a compliment, Frank, but don?t let it go to your head. ;) Oh, and *Rohanaka*, don?t talk sports with him, he is quite formidable in this area and he?s feeling a bit cocky these days because his _Cowboys_ are the team to beat in this NFC this year (although my *Chargers* may have something to say about going any farther than that).

 

*For the record, I do share an appreciation for classical music with you, but sadly lack any education to be able to carry on any sort of intelligent conversation about it.*

 

Oh, thank Heaven for that! There is nothing worse than an intelligent conversation about classical music. As for education, perish the thought altogether. Just listen and enjoy. The use of classical music in movies is a favorite subject. Since you already have an appreciation I hope you will notice any sort of music, classical or no for that matter, that strikes your fancy in movies and speak of it.

 

*--So--on with my reply:*

 

*but we wanted to leave it somewhere in there because we liked the scene*

 

*I think if you could get inside the heads of a lot of present day film makers you'd hear them say that only to themselves. I am not a huge Coen bros fan--but do enjoy some of their films Have not seen this one however. I think it is rather humorous that they had the self-confidence to admit it--I won't call it arrogance since I guess they have the right to spend their money however they want. But it is a very refreshing thought to actually hear someone admit such a thing.*

 

I need to clarify something. I believe I mentioned in my post that my Coen Bros quotes were paraphrased, which admittedly is not the best thing to do. Note to myself: Either quote or paraphrase but don?t quote and claim both because they are probably mutually exclusive anyway. So to say that ?but we wanted to leave it somewhere in there because we liked the scene,? is not an exact quote and should not be attributed to the Coen Bros. The gist of those quotes are, however, accurate. I don?t normally bother with these long Director?s cut voiceovers. Sometime they are interesting but who has time to go through the movie all over again just for that. But having endured some of them, I am surprised by what I hear. The illusion that a good filmmaker knows exactly what he/she is doing at all times is shattered. It sounds more like that they don?t really know, or at list aren?t sure, and that there is a lot of trial and error, and that it?s possible that they have made crucial errors that may have spoiled the whole movie. But you?re right, Rohanaka, it is refreshing to hear?sort of. I would still like to believe, though, (forlorn hope)that moviemakers are all but infallible and what I?m watching is a masterful work of art, or at least a great movie. Not that I?m asking too much, haha. But I think anyone else who has sat through these voiceovers will agree that such statements of uncertainty are quite common.

 

*Caution*: I would recommend not seeing The Man Who Wasn?t There. Why? Because I seem to be the only person in the world who likes it. ;) (It doesn't seem popular even among CoenBros enthusiasts)

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Hi Kathy! I forgot all about The Quiet Man being featured in E.T.! I don't know for

sure because I only have foggy memories of watching E.T., but it could have been the

first glimpse I ever got of TQM myself. I first remember seeing TQM much later and only liking

it a little. I enjoyed it but missed most of the character details and such, just as did with all

of Ford's films. I've only come to appreciate his movies in the past three years. As for Wayne,

I mostly saw only his later cowboy pictures, like True Grit on TV growing up and had

never seen any of his early oaters, including Stagecoach, until much later.

 

As Chris (movieman1957) mentions, the dvd commentary by Maureen O'Hara for TQM

is one of the genuine treasures of all dvd-dom (my word). :)

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Greetings Mr Grey,

 

Maybe Peckinpah chose not to because "Deke" was always chasing his past and "Pike" was always running from his "future/fate."

 

I hadn't thought about that but it sounds right.

 

Maybe James Coburn will save you. If you see Coop and Coop's Girl, you better not look too long.

 

Not after the way I gave him the brush off!

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Howdy Lynne!

 

I didn't know that scene in The Wild Bunch between Pike and Deke had been cut. It

does explain things somewhat so leaving it out I would imagine confused audiences a bit or

made their relationship seem even more vague.

 

I will probably put The Wild Bunch in my top 20 westerns now, based on the characters

of Pike and Deke mostly, and the elegiac moments you allude to. It was disconcerting

to see the power lines and poles in the scenery---I'm so unused to that in a western! But

it forces you to always be aware of the times the story is taking place in.

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Hello Laffite! (Oh no--another spelling moment like Gray vs Grey) Have to keep reminding myself...two f's one t! )

 

I thought you might be an Egyptian Queen

 

Not hardly! But I am the queen of all I survey--and at the present that would be perhaps the "messiest house in the free world" ...but that would be an unofficial title because after all--mess is a relative term I suppose--looking from a five year old's perspective--toys all over the place and such is like unto a paradise, and one person's disaster area is another person's masterpiece.

 

Regarding music--it is a big deal with me and I appreciate a wide variety of musical style. Music in movies can really make the story so much richer if done well. I don't pretend to be an expert on such things--I just know that if done correctly...the tiniest refrain can make me bust out bawling if I am able to associate the sound of the music with the images and dialogue on screen. And often times it can be so subtle that I'm not even aware it is a part of the equation. Other times it is the main focus. I only wish I could have taken more music classes in college to be better read on the topic. But my school days are way behind me now.

 

 

PS--with regard to the Coen's paraphrase--I think I got that it wasn't a quote--maybe could have worded my reply better.

 

would still like to believe, though, (forlorn hope)that moviemakers are all but infallible

 

I know it is hard to give up that hope...don't let it go, but don't buy into it too much either. It goes back to that accountability thing I mentioned earlier. A lot of modern movies get made by folks who feel no obligation whatsoever to anyone but themselves and I think a big reason is because audiences are letting them get away with it. I like the nostalgia of the old time movie makers. You get a much different picture in your mind about how things were done back then versus now. I don't know if the industry would have come so far if those early film makers had ignored the audience the way it is done today. Maybe it would not have mattered, but I like to think otherwise.

 

PSS--Sports talk is not my cup of tea--unless you are talking high school basketball or little league or something like that. Can not bring myself to watch all the hype associated with pro or college sports--fortunate to be married to someone who feels the same so we don't have to argue when it is on! :-)

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dvd-dom (my word

 

I just heard on the radio the other day about a bunch of new words that have been added to the dictionary due to the increase in technology and such--maybe you will start a trend and make it to the Webster's someday!! :-)

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> dvd-dom (my word

>

> I just heard on the radio the other day about a bunch of new words that have been added to the dictionary due to the increase in technology and such--maybe you will start a trend and make it to the Webster's someday!! :-)

 

Considering the trend in poor speaking and writing, I may just have a shot at it, sad to say!

 

By the way, I found this article about Ashford Castle, where the cast of TQM stayed and

where some scenes were filmed on its grounds; it sounds heavenly:

 

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=ec5af388-0aeb-469e-bac3-8da4fbd00f0d

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impressive reception foyer, the rich mahogany panelled walls and high ceilings, while appropriately old-fashioned, seemed fresh and updated. Ashford has been a luxury hotel since 1939 and has been overhauled several times since then through changes in ownership.

 

Soft, floral chintz-covered period furniture, fresh flowers overflowing antique vases and fine art hanging from every wall speak volumes of the finest in upper-crust country living, Irish style.

 

Do you think they will ever try to do something like THIS on Design on a Dime??? Man oh man--I have never really been one to dream about traveling abroad--(I am more of a "See the USA in your Chevrolet" kinda gal) but if I were to go anywhere in Ireland--I would want it to be someplace as nice as this. PS--liked the part about the "bumpy-cart ride" :-)

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Goddess: Went away for weekend, missed some good comments here. I am not familiar with What Price Hollywood? sounds interesting, thanks for sharing.

 

Cutter: Thanks for the good info about Sunset Blvd. I hope to see that documentary. I always appreciate your insight. : )

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