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MissGoddess
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*Hola, Laffite -- Thanks for the kind words. They are greatly appreciated. Now let's make sure this kind of thing doesn't happen again. :)*

 

Your welcome, Frank...they were sincerely meant. However, per your request, I promise "this kind of thing" won't happen again. (Full Disclosure: I sometime don't keep promises) :)

 

*You know, for a guy who always thinks his team is going to lose, I am feeling pretty good about the Cowboys this year.*

 

And for good reason. As you know, they are considered the team to beat in the NFC. This can't be quite said for the Chargers in the AFC but they are definitely a contend-ah.

 

*You've got company. I like The Man Who Wasn't There. I thought the first half of the film was very good, but the second half was less so...I loved Billy Bob Thornton's "Ed Crane."*

 

Me too. It was great just following Ed Crane around, especially in the early going. The discontent, the cynicism, the taciturnity, the weary eyes, the drawl, the slow drag off the cigarette, the noir aspect (another reason you probably liked this), and all that stuff up his sleeve. I almost went online to buy an Ed Crane T-shirt.

 

*I really struggled with my fussbudgets list. The primary reason is my liking films that usually don't feature "fussbudgets." I came up with five*

 

Thanks for taking the trouble with the screencaps and closed captions. Yep, those are the kinds of things they say. Very entertaining. I like fussbudgets because there is almost always a comic element even with the serious roles. The key to liking fussbudgets is that you have to see their innocence within all that fussing. (Warning: if you can?t find it you might just want to kill them). You hit a home run with Felix Ungar! My God, how did we all miss that one! A perfect example, really. And with Matthau as a foil, even better. I've added these to my lists (I am compiling a list from all over) and even saved your pictures.

 

Thanks

:)

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> {quote:title=AnnieLaurie wrote:}{quote}

> Goddess: Went away for weekend, missed some good comments here. I am not familiar with What Price Hollywood? sounds interesting, thanks for sharing.

>

 

If you ever see this on your TV schedule, I don't care what channel even AMC, you must watch it. It stars Constance Bennett who is a waitress who meets director Lowell Sherman at The Brown Derby (I think.) It basically is the same plot as A Star is Born where Sherman makes Bennett a star and Sherman falls victim to alcoholism. It's very good.

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Good day, Sir Swash -- Thanks for the kind words. They are greatly appreciated. Now let's make sure this kind of thing doesn't happen again.

 

Your welcome, Frank...they were sincerely meant. However, per your request, I promise "this kind of thing" won't happen again. (Full Disclosure: I sometime don't keep promises)

 

It's your plank to walk. :)

 

 

You've got company. I like The Man Who Wasn't There. I thought the first half of the film was very good, but the second half was less so...I loved Billy Bob Thornton's "Ed Crane."

 

Me too. It was great just following Ed Crane around, especially in the early going. The discontent, the cynicism, the taciturnity, the weary eyes, the drawl, the slow drag off the cigarette, the noir aspect (another reason you probably liked this), and all that stuff up his sleeve.

 

I thought it was fascinating that "Ed" barely spoke a word or moved a single muscle in the film. And, of course, he's surrounded by very chatty Coen characters. I just love that mix.

 

You are right, it's the noir vibe of The Man Who Wasn't There that really pulls me in. I thought it was similar to Blood Simple to start. But I feel the film loses its way in the second half. I still like it quite a bit, though.

 

I almost went online to buy an Ed Crane T-shirt.

 

:D Did you listen to the DVD commentary? The Coens LOVE "Ed."

 

I like fussbudgets because there is almost always a comic element even with the serious roles.

 

Since my classic film tastes primarily lie within film noir, westerns, and horror, I rarely run across "fussbudgets." I was going to include Andy Devine (Stagecoach & The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance) and Elisha Cook Jr. (The Killing) to highlight what I feel a "fussbudget" is like in westerns and film noir, but they just didn't fit to me.

 

The key to liking fussbudgets is that you have to see their innocence within all that fussing.

 

That's wonderfully put. I definitely agree with you. It's funny, but I'm usually annoyed with the "fussbudget" at the start of a film but, by the end, I love them. I think that's what a storyteller wishes to get out of such a character, too.

 

(Warning: if you can?t find it you might just want to kill them).

 

Very much so. Henny Pennies can drive people up the wall, especially guys.

 

You hit a home run with Felix Ungar! My God, how did we all miss that one! A perfect example, really. And with Matthau as a foil, even better.

 

I think Jack Lemmon is a "fussbudget" star. I believe this is why he's not always liked. He usually brings a natural, nervous energy to his performances. I really like that about him. He's rather unique.

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Hiya Frank: "I think Jack Lemmon is a "fussbudget" star. I believe this is why he's not always liked. He usually brings a natural, nervous energy to his performances. I really like that about him. He's rather unique."

 

Good call re: Lemmon. D'ya know who I think fits in this category as well, PAUL LYNDE. Just check him out in "Send Me No Flowers" and to some extent: "Bye Bye Birdie." That dude is all over the place in his fussbudgetry.

 

Message was edited by CineMaven -- P.S., how's your summer going?

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*Good day, Sir Swash*

 

Good day, Sir Frank...and a Happy Bastille Day to you all!

 

*It's your plank to walk. :)*

 

Argh? I hate it when people bring that up. ;) The only thing worse than walking the plank is being keelhauled. I avoid both...assiduously.

 

*I thought it was fascinating that "Ed" barely spoke a word or moved a single muscle in the film. And, of course, he's surrounded by very chatty Coen characters. I just love that mix.*

 

I tried to be Ed Crane...for awhile. Just walking around and not talking to anyone and being cynical and thinking all kinds of snide thoughts about everyone and everything. It was great fun until I realized that's the away I am anyway. :( Talk about an epiphany! Actually, I could never be Ed Crane. I talk too much (but the rest is right on) ;)

 

(:) Did you listen to the DVD commentary? The Coens LOVE "Ed."

 

Hmm...no, I missed that :(

 

*Since my classic film tastes primarily lie within film noir, westerns, and horror, I rarely run across "fussbudgets." I was going to include Andy Devine (Stagecoach & The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance) and Elisha Cook Jr. (The Killing) to highlight what I feel a "fussbudget" is like in westerns and film noir, but they just didn't fit to me.*

 

Good point, fussbudgets don't thrive (much less exist) in those genres. But it might be fun to keep the radar going, might just get a blip on the screen. I agree about Elisha, a little too mousy and obsequious to be a real fussbudget. And I don't think Marie would have taken too much crap from him. Andy Devine is fading in and out in my memory in that movie but though he can be a jolly sort, he would make a fussy too, and he has the voice for it.

 

*I think Jack Lemmon is a "fussbudget" star. I believe this is why he's not always liked. He usually brings a natural, nervous energy to his performances. I really like that about him. He's rather unique.*

 

Good points all. The "nervous energy" thing is something that no self-respecting fussbudget can do without.

 

:)

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bonjour henry drummond/ frankiefurter!

 

*Ahhh, yes, the all too familiar refrain of disappointment.*

 

hey youre the one who's always mean to me! i just leave to go to bed, if thats leaving you out in the cold, well at least i left you mittnes with a prince and a princess to give you manners and chat with. but no! you decided to get rid of them, and now THEY are left in the gutter somewhere. poor babies! i tried to help you, but no!

 

*How could you not like Forty Guns? I mean, it has a lovely wedding in it.*

 

i liked the acting and the personalities of the character, but i just couldnt get into the plotline. the wedding has nothing to do with it! goodness just because i get weak inthe knees at a wedding and start crying, doesnt mean i succumb to every wedding in the movies......although i do for most of them, but thats not to point and you know it! ;)

 

*i can't see you wanting to waste any tea, and I know your pretend doll wouldn't dare do such a thing, and I can't see a British lass doing so, either. I think I'm safe. And I bet Angela is very proud of her mean performance. It's perfectly chilling! It's almost as cold as a Manhattan blizzard.*

 

well i probably wouldnt waste any tea, but if angela reads what you said about her, SHE'LL want to waste some tea down your back. good and hot too! she isnt one to be gullible, like i am. heehee! angela is a very fiesty one and she get you good and plenty! april give him one of those manhattan blizzards you have been saving up for a sepcial occasion. i think we have waited long enough. heehee!

 

*Smithy is #1! He's an escaped lunatic who fools everyone with his calm demeanor.*

 

my smithy isnt a psycho! he is precious and sweet!

 

does that look like a psycho maniac to you? look at that face! that sweet face!

 

The%20Ending%20of%20The%20Classic%20Random%20Harvest.jpg

 

*Who are Mr. and Mrs. Bennet? Are those Smithy's parents? Can you believe he actually offed them both? How awful!*

 

give me a minute to lift myself off the floor!

 

okay im good.

 

mr and mrs bennett are kind sweet parents who want the best for their daughters! hedid most certainly NOT kill them. i might hire him to kill you though! honestly! heehee!

 

*You got to see Inherit the Wind AND To Kill a Mockingbird as a double-feature at the Paramount? Wow! Now that's quite a powerful twinbill. You lucky gal, you. I love Gene Kelly's performance. His "E.K. Hornbeck" is so bitey. I also like the fact that "Drummond" stands up to him when he badmouths "Matt Brady." Unlike Drummond, Hornbeck lacks humanity.*

 

of course! i just came to see To Kill a Mockingbird, b/c i love gregory peck in that movie, but i stayed to see Inherit the Wind beforehand too. gregory looks so handsome on the big screen. imagine if i got to see Valley of DEcision on the big screen with im AND greer! i would be unconscious still! heehee! see, i only liked some scenes of gene kelly in that movie. he ws bitey alright, but he didnt always say the right things like i wanted him to. spence turned out being the better person there. Hornbeck also lacks humility, whereas drummond stood up for most of the right things to do. hornbeck just wasnt as strong as drummond.

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april give him one of those manhattan blizzards you have been saving up for a sepcial occasion. i think we have waited long enough. heehee!

 

HERE you are at last, naughty Butterscotch! I'll only unleash a Norther if you proceed

SOUTH to the Western Gallery and whip that ungrateful wretched mr grimes into shape!

Honestly, he is out of control since you left me to his ungallant mercies. :P

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*Regarding music--...And often times it can be so subtle that I'm not even aware it is a part of the equation. Other times it is the main focus.*

 

Hi Rhonaka, there's a wonderful example of this in a major movie in the 40s that I will not reveal to avoid spoilers. I think I posted this elsewhere some time ago so this might be familiar to some but I think it bears re-telling because it so a propos here and fascinating in it's own right.

 

A woman is nervously wringing her hands while waiting in her living room for a beau to come and pick her up for a date. She hears the car out front and rushes excitedly out to her front porch. The car, however, keeps going and we are made to understand that she has been stood up at the last minute. During previews, before actual release, the audience laughed at her as the car whizzed away. This was not intended. The audience was supposed to feel sorry for her. So they asked Aaron Copland, who wrote the music for this film, to help out. He came up with a modern sounding passage that alone would probably mean nothing but here it was enough to dispell the unwanted reaction, as subsequent previews bore out. I would say that this was a "subtle" example. We know the less subtle (e.g. GWTW theme). So, why didn't they know that the audience would laugh? This ties in a little with the other point, about making good decisions and being responsible to the audience. The above case was a major studio production and so they feel they must test the waters with previews for commercial purposes, but it's interesting to me that studio apparently had no clue that the audience would laugh. Amazing, and yet, as we know if we (I) care to admit, movies are hard to make and we cannot expect them to be infallble. Doh.

 

BTW, I got this story from a documentary on Aaron Copland and I'm quite sure it is accurate.

 

 

I know there are some of you out there who know the movie, yes? :)

 

///

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*Bonjour, mon amie fabuleuse!!!*

 

bonjour, mon amie intrepide!

 

*Mais oui, not only gorgeous, but classy gorgeous too. I like those screen caps you posted. Interesting that there is only one that is an actual scene from the movie. The others are apparently between-take stills but they are nice. I hope you get to see it. Does you have Netflix?*

 

really? i thought most of them were scenes from the movie. thats interesting. is her hair ever down in the movie like that all curly? its so pretty like that. or is it up gibson style the whole time?

 

no i dont have Netflix. my parents dont do those kind of things. i wish i could have it though, so i could see all helen's movies, well the good ones anyway.

 

*I would say so but I like other stuff too. I like colonial settings because great stories can come out of that, i.e., A Passage To India, The Man Who Would be King, Out of Africa, The Flame Trees of Thicka (PBS MiniSeries), Chocolat (1987, Clair Denis...not to be confused with later film of same title starring Juliette Binoche), and one of my favorites, The Raj Quartet (PBS MiniSeries) and a bunch others.*

 

vous spectacle gout magnifique! i like those kinds of movies, especially Out of Africa! i absolutely love this movie for its plot, acting, actors, when and where it is set, and the intricacy of how it was made. it is so beautiful and portrays a sense of deep emotion. i have heard about the Man Who Would be King, but have never seen that one. i have been told that i would like it. what do you think?

 

*Well, I hope you both can see it...but if you don't like it. I may have to ship out in a hurry*

 

is this a trick question?most anything with helen is great, especially being set in the 1800s. wow! i cant wait!

 

*Oh, and BTW, when you see this, you will behold THE BIGGEST FUSSBUDGET IN THE HISTORY OF WORLD (much less in movies.) Now you must see it. I mean, this fussbudget makes other fussbudgets look like sweetie pies.*

 

i gathered that from your info about it. heehee!

it sounds interesting. i guess this means i must see it!

 

*ps...it's not Helen.*

 

phew! it was touch and go there for a second. heehee! or i would have had to get my long black gloves out and find my sword!

 

*Thanks, I'll keep that in mind the next time somebody comes at me with a machete.*

 

you better! we cant have a cut up into little piece laffite! that would be utterly diasasterous! with whome would i practice me french, besides sweet april and frankie?

 

*When I was kid there was pirate in a Peter Pan comic book who was singing:*

 

*Oh the pirates life*

*Is a wonderful life*

*Ho, ho, ho,*

 

....and a pirate's life for me. la dee da!

 

*...but I don't think that pirate watches the History Channel much. Boy, there are some programs there about Pirates that make me want to give up the highs seas altogether. I mean I could be having fun somewhere else being tortured.*

 

i dont thini many pirates nowdays watch the history channel much. heehee! they might get scared and run for their mommies. ;) after all every pirate needs a mommy!

 

i dont think you have any more fun being tortured in a dark and damp cave by just anybody. no, the way to be tortured is by an honest pirate....after all, "its the honest ones you ought to look out for, because you never know when they will do something extremely.....stupid!" heehee!

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He came up with a modern sounding passage that alone would probably mean nothing but here it was enough to dispell the unwanted reaction, as subsequent previews bore out. I would say that this was a "subtle" example. We know the less subtle (e.g. GWTW theme).

 

This is a great example--nicely done. Music is one of the most expressive (and influential) methods of communication if you think about it because it is not something you can really grasp physically. It is of course "heard" by our ears--but not understood by them. Only by our emotions and attitudes.

 

Can't wait to find out what film you were referring to--the scene sounds familiar--but I can't place it--may be remembering something different anyway.

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Hey Mr. Grey Guy--by the way--I read your rather threatening post over in the Western Gallery--"Someday when your back is turned.." There is a whole new side I am seeing to you...and it falls far to the black-hat end on the old color line!! Hmmm...Miss Goddess--could it be that all that "gray" is just for show after all??? :-)

 

Message was edited by: rohanaka

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Now, this is a film I haven't seen yet--but looked it up because I wasnt' sure of your reference....( I wondered why you were calling him "cabman") :-) Sounds very gruesome...Poor Grey and McFarlane---from what I've read in the outline--they shoulda come over to the white side. :-) Reminds me of that line from the recent remake of the Mummy where the librarian gal tells the sleazy bad guy something to the effect that she wasn't worried because history had proven that nasty little men like him always get their come-uppance in the end. (No--Scott--I promise I am not referring to you this time--just to the other film....I have found you to be a perfectly nice human being.--So put the knife back down....) :-)

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Ha! Yes, *The Body Snatcher* is rather gruesome but it also features some of the most

wonderfully written scenes between Henry Daniel and Boris Karloff. Quite extraordinary dialogue

and the actors are more than up to it. A clash of two enormous egos. They are the chief reason I like the film.

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i have heard about the Man Who Would be King, but have never seen that one.

 

The Man Who Would Be King is one of my all time favorites- I should have mentioned it before. It was one of the first films I ever bought (a-way back when VHS was new). You should definitely see it, Scotchie. I remember reading that Huston wanted to film it much earlier in his career, with Spencer Tracy and ....my memory is failing me.... and ..... someone help me out here....

 

La-

 

a major movie in the 40s

 

I think I know! Is it based on a Henry James novel?

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I remember reading that Huston wanted to film it much earlier in his career, with Spencer Tracy and ....my memory is failing me.... and ..... someone help me out here....>>

 

Clark Gable in the Connery role and Spencer Tracy as Peachy.

 

PS: Summer School has officially started!

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Howdy, White Hat Ro -- Hey Mr. Grey Guy--by the way--I read your rather threatening post over in the Western Gallery--"Someday when your back is turned.." There is a whole new side I am seeing to you...and it falls far to the black-hat end on the old color line!!

 

:D Ohhh, but my stabs are caring and full of love and kindness.

 

could it be that all that "gray" is just for show after all???

 

Of course! If I didn't speak up for "grey," you'd soon find my black hat. :)

 

Reminds me of that line from the recent remake of the Mummy where the librarian gal tells the sleazy bad guy something to the effect that she wasn't worried because history had proven that nasty little men like him always get their come-uppance in the end. (No--Scott--I promise I am not referring to you this time--just to the other film....I have found you to be a perfectly nice human being.--So put the knife back down....)

 

You're making me laugh! I've had many comeuppances around here already, and I'm sure many are yet to come up. Don't worry, I know I'm not going to prevail in the end. ;)

 

Howdy, Fordy Guns -- Yes, it was a rather bold statement from Mr self-proclaimed "peacemaker", "nice", "kind", "loving" Grey Cabman. But then...you remember what happened to poor old Toddy when he trusted him...

 

Toddy murdered Cabman Gray. Now I understand the "yours truly." But I shall haunt you more in death.

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In an interview of Huston I saw he did mention Gable and _Bogart_ for The Man Who Would be King. I would love to have seen those two together, how fascinating! It might have been too much for my heart to stand. :D

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Rohanaka, I'm actually thinking of you tonight while watching the Home Run Derby. I'm actually teary-eyed watching Josh Hamilton. Josh is a young ballplayer who had it all then nearly destroyed his life with drugs and alcohol. He overcame those demons and made it to the majors last season. Tonight, he's putting on one of the greatest shows in Home Run Derby history on the biggest stage in all of baseball, Yankee Stadium, which is in its final year.

 

Josh brought a lot of black to his life, but now he's experiencing the white.

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