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Movie Rambles


MissGoddess
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My mother actually sat through I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE and declared it "stupid".

 

I asked her why she didn't just shut it off. Her answer: "Well, I wanted to see just how stupid it could get".

 

 

Hahahahahahaaaa!!!

 

That's the "review" I've waited for.

 

I agree it seemed like an allegory about marriage.

 

In fact, I didn't pick up on any difference between monster husbands and

human husbands until lightening flashed in their faces. Both behaved

the same. :P

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Drat! Looks like I will miss Tunes of Glory. I usually don't like military pictures

buy you all make it sound like one not to skip.

 

I'm glad everyone enjoyed THE GOOD FAIRY as much as I had hoped.

 

Comedies like this....why do they seem so intrinsically tied to that so-called

"golden age"? Was there something in the water back then? :) I am continually

impressed by how utterly unforced the best of them are. They seem self-propelled

by their own particular kind of effortless energy. Writers, directors and actors all

seemed in such perfect synch. Glorious.

 

Message was edited by: MissGoddess

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Was her name Francine? I felt really bad for her. She had to be one of the most frustrated "bad girls" I remember seeing in a film. There she was flaunting it and yet no takers! In fact all the men were very dismissive of her. I thought she was pretty hot! I probably shed a tear myself when she was zapped. Now why did they want to go and do that for?

 

Lol! I was pretty incredulous at how among all these men this cute little Elizabeth

Taylor wanna-be couldn't raise anyone's temp one degree. Kind of like a bar in Manhattan. :P

 

These aliens were rather high minded in their morals. Remember the stalking lech? He wasn't up to their standards so hey let's just "off em" sopranos style.

 

This part REALLY had me cracking up! I kind of felt like he was the only guy in the movie

who seemed normal, lol! I even wondered where they were going with his character, if he'd

turn out to be more important to the story or maybe he was an undercover cop or something.

But no, he just had too much mouth so they offed him.

 

I had no idea Tom Tryon was the same guy as the author of those books. You learn

something new all the time at TCM. :)

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Drat! Looks like I will miss Tunes of Glory. I usually don't like military pictures

> buy you all make it sound like one not to skip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's on YouTube, Goddess, and a very good print. Do not be put off by the military context; it is the very heart and soul of the story.

>

> I'm glad everyone enjoyed THE GOOD FAIRY as much as I had hoped.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think I'd better hang up my "critic" hat because I really don't know where my mind was or is, comparing hard-but-vulnerable Sally Bowles or "real phony" Holly Golightly, to that appealing naive waif Luisa Ginglebusher. I don't know, I thought a certain basic unwordly innocence linked all of these girls, but maybe I just should cut back on the coffee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

>

> Comedies like this....why do they seem so intrinsically tied to that so-called

> "golden age"? Was there something in the water back then? :) I am continually

> impressed by how utterly unforced the best of them are. They seem self-propelled

> by their own particular kind of effortless energy. Writers, directors and actors all

> seemed in such perfect synch. Glorious.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think we need to put that something BACK into our water.

>

> Message was edited by: MissGoddess

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taht movie was teh BOMB! i just cant take my eyes off alec and mills, they are so good it made me want to cry near the end when one of them ehm does something you might not expect him to do (shhhhhh!!!!) ;)

 

i want to see this movie again, ti si so well acted. :)

 

Message was edited by: texanna

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That's a good comparison, Bronxie. He was all tight inside himself, the way Colman could be. He held himself so upright, but as you continued to watch you realized he was a quivering mess inside. He was like a brittle tower just waiting to be shattered. I could also see why Guinness wanted to shatter him.

 

It was like watching a really tense tennis match - just when you thought Guinness had the point, Mills would take it ....and just when you thought Mills was going to win, Guinness would suddenly surge ahead. It was gripping, but really, really sad. And as each man tried to wrest power from the other, you felt sorry for the one down at that moment. Then the movie would yank back from the brink of sentiment, and you realized they were both awful, or mad.

 

John Mills, I have to say, I have never liked very much. I do like him in Hobson's Choice, but that's about it. I know he's a good actor, but there is something innately unlikeable about him. The director really took advantage of that priggishness he can exude. This is THE best role I've seen him in. And Guinness, well, he is one of my all time favorite actors. They were both very brave in their portrayals of career soldiers, so caught up in appearing strong that they lost whatever humanity they might have had. It was very interesting to watch this one after Kwai, which is sort of about the same subject. The madness of the military. Though Kwai is more about the madness of war and Tunes is about how military life can twist a man until he doesn't have a soul. Also strange that Guinness continued to portray these roles, because he was a real navy man, and proud of it. But he is as different as he can be from one movie to the other. In Tunes, he's sadistic, cruel and oaffish, but still, you can understand his underlying motivations.

 

That last scene just blew me away. The drums...... ta ta ta tum.....

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I love your description of Sinclair's and Barrow's relationship in terms of a tennis match, jackie.

 

These two men, with different social backgrounds and personalities, are symbolically linked through the experience of war. They both want what's best for the regiment. Rough-hewn, up-from-the-ranks ex-piper Jock craves approval and demands loyalty from his "babies", and maintains a colorfully lax discipline that draws heavily on lively and down-to-earth Scottish customs and traditions. Patrician Basil is the product of centuries-old British Empire and is by birth and breeding wedded to the imperially romantic notion of the "idea" of the regiment.

 

I'm hypnotically drawn to Guinness's portrayal of Jock. Sinclair is charismatic; he's equal parts opaque and transparent. His jovialty barely conceals a watchful, shrewd, defensive intuition that allows him to instantly change on a dime, from bantering with the boys or sharing a dram with Charlie Scott (the deliciously icy Dennis Price) to then quickly snapping to attention at whatever sound or movement is about, almost as though he were still a soldier in the field, relying on his instincts for his very survival. Guinness's facial and body movements perfectly convey these shifting emotions. He bares his teeth in a frighteningly hearty grin and exhorts his men to do the same.

When he first sees Barrow, who arrives a day early, there is a nervous twist to Jock's mouth, as if he were a rowdy student caught in mid-party mode by a stern headmaster; but just as quickly he can size up Barrow and then treat him with contempt and distain.

 

Mills gives a brilliantly implosive, moving performance; Barrow is a gentleman through and through, and the scene that emphasizes this is, in the midst of his agonizing over whether to follow through with charges against Jock, he is interrupted in his torment by the comically solicitous little private who asks him if he wants a donut with his tea. Barrow does not shout at the lad to get out, but declines the offer and then gently apologizes for disappointing him. As the boy leaves, Barrow shakes his head in a quietly exasperated way, as if he doesn't know whether to laugh or cry, or do both.

 

I haven't seen that many John Mills movies. I too love him in HOBSON'S CHOICE. ("By gum!") He has a bantam-weight, "everyman" quality about him, nothing flashy or exciting, but solid and understated.

 

 

I love that the movie is in color; it emphasizes the "quaintness" of the Scottish traditions. The story is set in wintertime, and there is a poignant, bittersweet symbolism to the snow, especially in the evocative last shot.

 

When Sinclair intones "....all the tunes of glory....", that is when I break down.

 

"Oh, you mean men...."

 

caineglory2shot.jpg

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

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*Tunes of Glory* is indeed one of John Mills' finest hours, especially considering he was totally cast against type. For those who haven't seen many of his other performances, *Great Expectations* and *This Happy Breed* are highly recommended.

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Barbara you and Wendy have really raised the bar for me wanting

to see this movie. Brilliant character analyses, ladies! I'm fascinated.

 

I caught about 15 minutes, starting when Jock (Guinness) pays a call

on his actress lady friend. I loved how she started acting crazy and dancing

in the hall as he left her dressing room and he called a fool or something

but he obviously loved it.

 

I almost thought it WAS Ronald Colman when I first saw John Mills. He even

used the same perplexed and anguished facial expressions. Without actually

seeing the whole movie I was able to pick up on all the details of character that

you ladies delineated just from my brief glimpse of each man. That's a real

testament to their respective abilities.

 

I've always admired Guinness, mainly from Doctor Zhivago and The Swan,

which I know are hardly his greatest roles but they remain my favorites. I've

always adored his voice. Guinness always stands out while John Mills, as

you perfectly described him, Barbara, was an "everyman" who blends in. He

and Cyril Cusack remind me of one another. Both extraordinarily subtle actors.

Johnny was quite touching as the village simpleton in Ryan's Daughter.

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Barbara you and Wendy have really raised the bar for me wanting

to see this movie. Brilliant character analyses, ladies! I'm fascinated.

 

I caught about 15 minutes, starting when Jock (Guinness) pays a call

on his actress lady friend. I loved how she started acting crazy and dancing

in the hall as he left her dressing room and he called a fool or something

but he obviously loved it.

 

I almost thought it WAS Ronald Colman when I first saw John Mills. He even

used the same perplexed and anguished facial expressions. Without actually

seeing the whole movie I was able to pick up on all the details of character that

you ladies delineated just from my brief glimpse of each man. That's a real

testament to their respective abilities.

 

I've always admired Guinness, mainly from Doctor Zhivago and The Swan,

which I know are hardly his greatest roles but they remain my favorites. I've

always adored his voice. Guinness always stands out while John Mills, as

you perfectly described him, Barbara, was an "everyman" who blends in. He

and Cyril Cusack remind me of one another. Both extraordinarily subtle actors.

Johnny was quite touching as the village simpleton in Ryan's Daughter.

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Miss G- I have only seen the last 10 minutes of The Swan, but Guinness, again, had me in tears. I didn't watch it for the obvious reason..... Grace Kelly, little lamby. But when I saw the end, I wished I had not been so snobbish..... A Guinness trumps a Kelly every time. :)

 

Bronxie - Don't even get me started on Dennis Price.....his performance was so pivotal in the movie. His character was glistening and malevolent, as usual, but super deep. However, the amazing thing about this movie is that I could see the underpinnings of why he was like he was. He had been bullied for so long... so he just sat back, observed and waited for an opportunity to stick it to his "best friend". He sinks back into his chair, lazily blowing whichever way the crowd goes, but subtly influencing the whole proceedings. Then he sticks it to Barrow just as smoothly as if he were having a cup of tea. And he doesn't even get a bawling out at the end, like Fred MacMurray in The Caine Mutiny......

 

I also wanted to say that I love Gordon Jackson in anything, even if he does play the same bland character over and over.....

 

And Angus Lennie, (the orderly with the donut) I just love his wee little glasses on his wee little nose.... thank goodness he was in this movie. It needed a tiny bit of comic relief.....

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Guinness' performance in *The Swan* is perhaps one of his more subtle and nuanced ones, at least up to that point in time.

 

Personally, I first became aware of Guinness when he played this guy:

 

obi-wan460.jpg

 

But over the years I've grown to admire him for his excellent performances in so many 50s and 60s movies, especially the ones directed by David Lean, as MG mentioned.

 

Lawrence.gifKwai.jpg7138-5125.gif

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Hi Wendy! While Alec can be a little hammy in The Swan he is

delightful and at the end, he brings out his humanity. I love Agnes

Moorehead and Jessie Royce Landis as well in this, oh! And you

have to see Brian Aherne as a very relaxed cleric, of all things.

 

I am a Grace Kelly fan, so that is no obstacle for me and I do

think she is at her most vulnerable, by far, in this inverted fairy

tale. She and Alec became fast friends while making this movie,

discovering they shared a darkly mordant sense of humor. They

started a running gag between them of having a large axe laid out

on the other's bed at whatever hotel they happened to stay. This

went on for years.

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I remember that story! I think I said at the time that it made me like Grace better knowing that she had a sense of humor like that! I will have to give her another chance... and The Swan sounds like it is the perfect movie to watch her in.... I do love a good fairy tale.

 

Unfortunately, I see that The Swan is not on the schedule anytime soon, and I can't find it at Netflix or Youtube. The only dvd I can find is a silent version from 1925! I can't believe that this is on dvd, and the 1956 version isn't! Did you know that like The Good Fairy and Liliom, The Swan is based on a Molnar play? I just love Molnar......

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