Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

>

>

> >

> >

> >

>

>

>

> Lol, oh, I missed that part. I only saw about 20-25 minutes but I was "hooked" on that "TV".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh my gosh, you mean that actually WAS "Judge Gaffney"???

I love him in HARVEY, especially when he calls Veta "girl".

 

I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw the Twonky t.v. get, shall I say, VERY close to the second set in a way that was unmistakable.

 

I loved the way the Twonky "walked" on those legs, LOL. And I agree about its look -- so quaint and pretty and tiny, unlike all the cold modern technology we have now.

>

> So, did the little "Twonky" ever actually play a television show?? He cleaned dishes

> marvelously well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

,

 

 

 

 

 

There was a lady singing on its screen; also a Western.

 

I'd want a Twonky to do my laundry and clean the bathroom.

>

> It just struck me, from what little I saw this movie even reminds me of HARVEY in

> the fact that you've got a guy who's living with a, well, if not a "pooka" then something

> just as hard to explain!! No wonder they picked Billy Lynn. :)

 

 

 

 

 

I was actually thinking of HARVEY too, aside from Coach Trout, ha!!

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw the Twonky t.v. get, shall I say, VERY close to the second set in a way that was unmistakable.

 

HA!!

And did they have several little "Twonkies" later on?

 

I love how it walked, too, the whole thing was unbelievably strange and cute.

 

Another line that cracked me up was "Who outside of Hollywood manufactures

mechanical men?" hahahahaaaa!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my goodness, that is HILARIOUS. _Everyone_ gets their 15 minutes of fame. :)

 

I'm zonked (or is it "twonked"?) and will be recording our own Madame Brittles

to watch her first thing in the a.m.

 

nite nite

Link to post
Share on other sites

I look forward to your reply. Enjoy!!

 

[/i]?I know I mentioned this in another thread, but I think Alice thought the movie was really Mammy's story.

 

I thought the other fascinating thing about her take on the movie was that when she got up this morning she immediately said ?I loved the music in that movie, Mom. It was beautiful.? " - JackFavell.

 

You?ve got a wise daughter there Jackayyyyyyy.

 

 

?Maven I just love your GWTW post; your consciousness was doing some great streaming. I ate up every word. I can't wait to ramble further about it with you and Miss G.? - Bronxgirl.

 

Bet...after the pilgrimage.

 

Message was edited by: CineMaven

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello again!

 

Well I'm back from seeing Gone with the Wind in just about the best way imaginable:

in Atlanta, in the Fox Theater and in the company of almost 5,000 die-hard fans (the

majority of whom were, of course, southerners :) ).

 

After 70 years, Scarlett is still the cutest little trick in shoe leather. ;)

 

The Fox Theater really lives up to the name "movie palace" and we were treated

to a little taste of what seeing a movie like GWTW must have been like back in the

day. The theater was built to mimic an Egyptian palace, complete with all the trimmings

including a ceiling that really does look like the deep, velvety night sky over Cairo filled

with twinkling stars and floating gossamer clouds. Being designed for live performances

as well as film showings, there is a real proscinium stage and a full size orchestra pit. I

got a sneak peak back stage and I swear it gave me chills---the smell of the old wood,

seeing the curtain pulls and the ropes hanging and then a spot light---I almost felt

like Ginger Rogers for a whole minute! :D

 

The theater also boasts a beautiful, custom made and ornately gilded Moller organ they

affectionately dubbed "Mighty Mo" and before the movie started, it rose from the orchestra

pit and was played by Larry Douglas Embury who is their organist "in residence". It was a

lot of fun and all very theatrical, even the audience members go in the act: there were three

couples dressed in Southern attire of the period. They were seated in the row just in front

of mine so I got a close look at the costumes and they looked very authentic, right

down to the ear-bobs and shoe buttons. :)

 

Then Robert Osborne came on stage where he was joined by authors Molly Haskell

(Frankly My Dear) and Michael Sragow (Victor Fleming: An American

Master) and they proceeded to answer previously submitted audience questions

about the epic. Robert Osborne finished up by relating a telephone conversation

he had just shared with Olivia de Havilland, who asked he extend her pleasure

at knowing the movie still attracted so much love and attention (and box office), which she

added was a testament to the talents of Margaret Mitchell and David O. Selznick.

 

As you can imgine, that went down _very_ well with us in the audience!

 

Still, as fun as the preliminaries were, you just can't compare them to the goose

pimples I think many of us felt as that ornately embroidered curtain was raised in

state to the opening bells tolling their fanfare to the Selznick logo. It sparked the first of

MANY bursts of applause and cheers. (To say Atlanta is receptive to this movie

after 70 years is an understatement of almost offensive proportions.) I thought

NYC was vocal and excited at the screening I saw recently, but after all, this

was HOME for Scarlett and Rhett.

 

I've never seen this film on such an enormous screen, and together with the

unique acoustics of such a theater it made for a heady experience I'll never

forget. People were taking photos of the movie screen during certain scenes,

which was a little excessive, ha! I think one of the biggest rounds of

applause came for the scene when Scarlett shoots the Yankee! It

was Atlanta, after all. :P

 

Outside the theater there were parked two cars: a beautiful creme colored

sedan and a navy blue roadster, both circa 1939 and which were

in the Atlanta motorcade for the movie premiere (the cream one

charioted Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh, as well as one of the last living

Confederate veterans). Those were pretty cool. I almost expected

to see Norma Desmond step right out of one of them. :)

 

All in all, it was a glorious way to personally cap off one of

the most exciting and meaningful of weeks, and for which I'm

extremely grateful to have participated.

 

P.S. Here is a link to the website for the theater, which tells a little

about its history and has a few pictures. This was not the

theater that hosted the premiere for Gone with the Wind. That

was the Loews Grand (pictured below), which sadly was torn down.

The Fox nearly suffered the same fate.

 

http://www.foxtheatre.org/history.htm

 

Atlantapremiere.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great weekend. And I was free. Darn. Michael Sragow, last I saw wrote for the local Baltimore Sun. He didn't write about classic films too often but when he did you could tell he was a fan.

 

I'm glad you got to enjoy it in a big theater. We are about to lose our special theater in Baltimore called "The Senator." It opened in 1939. For a lot of reasons it will be gone shortly.

 

Welcome "home."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow April... what a terrific experience for you!!! YOU are really riding high w/ the Fan Programmer stuff and this all coming in the same week... :-)

 

Thanks so much for sharing this with everyone. It sounds like a perfect way to view such a terrific movie and I imagine it was the next best thing to being there 70 years ago!! And reading your post here is likely the next best thing to having been there LAST NIGHT as well!! :-)

 

Thanks again!

Link to post
Share on other sites

MissG,

 

Congrats on being part of that glorious celebration in Atlanta!

 

I don't know if they will do the same sort of celebration ten years from now when the film turns 80 so you may have just experienced a once-in-a-lifetime experience considering the next time they celebrate the anniversary on this scale may be another twenty years when the film turns 90 (or they may wait till for the 100 anniversary, who's to say.)

 

So glad to you got to see one of your favorite films on the screen of a true movie palace. There aren't too many opportunities like that left these days and everyone should get an experience like that at least once.

 

So, congrats again and thanks for sharing your adventure with us!

Link to post
Share on other sites

That you experienced such an event is great, but to share it with us is even better!

 

Did you touch the car that held Gable and Leigh? I would have, if given the opportunity...

 

I love that the organ had a name.

 

Olivia de Havilland is always the lady, always says the right thing.

 

The restoration page of that link was very interesting and gave a good idea of whta the theatre must have looked like in it's heyday.

 

What I like most from your missive was your description of the audience. I think you must have been with the most appreciative audience ever, with the exception of the original opening night spectators.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> What a great weekend. And I was free. Darn. Michael Sragow, last I saw wrote for the local Baltimore Sun. He didn't write about classic films too often but when he did you could tell he was a fan.

>

 

Hi Chris! I believe he's still with the Sun. I did get to chat with him at a reception

on Saturday, where he also spoke with Ms. Haskell and Robert Osborne, this time

to a smaller audience at the Margaret Mitchell house and museum. He laughed

when I told him I was "so upset" after reading his book. He asked "Why?!" and I

said it was bad enough knowing I'd missed out on Rhett Butler twice---once because

he was pure fiction and secondly because he was Clark Gable and I was

born too late---but now I learn he was also Victor Fleming right down to his boots.

That makes three strikes and I'm out! He got a laugh out of that. :)

 

It was a goose pimply moment when I went down into THE ROOM where

SHE wrote IT. Wow! What really struck me was how familiar it all looked.

None of the furnishings were original to her---all her stuff was gone, burned

or scattered but they tried to reproduce it as closely as they could. What

was familiar is that I grew up in a Victorian house that had several of

the original furnishings and we even found the original wall papers underneath

later ones during a redecoration. The curtains and the bed all seemed like

they came from my own old house.

 

 

> I'm glad you got to enjoy it in a big theater. We are about to lose our special theater in Baltimore called "The Senator." It opened in 1939. For a lot of reasons it will be gone shortly.

>

> Welcome "home."

 

Oh, dear! Why? Was The Senator from the wrong party? :P When I hear things like that it just

makes me so mad.

 

I mean about "The Senator", not your kind "welcome home". :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for sharing this with everyone. It sounds like a perfect way to view such a terrific movie and I imagine it was the next best thing to being there 70 years ago!! And reading your post here is likely the next best thing to having been there LAST NIGHT as well!! :-)

 

 

Howdy, pilgrimess! I believe it WAS the next best thing to being at the premiere. It

was incredible. They even served champagne before and during the intermission! My

kind of "concession". :D

 

The only way to top it would be to see it again, seated next to Oliva de Havilland. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats on being part of that glorious celebration in Atlanta!

 

Thank you kindly, Mrs Z!

 

I don't know if they will do the same sort of celebration ten years from now when the film turns 80 so you may have just experienced a once-in-a-lifetime experience considering the next time they celebrate the anniversary on this scale may be another twenty years when the film turns 90 (or they may wait till for the 100 anniversary, who's to say.)

 

I might be in a wheelchair if it's to be the 100th anniversary! :D There were quite a few

white hairs in that theater, but also a few younger ones, including some kiddies. It was

especially touching to see that most people came well dressed, perhaps because many

came from church. There were several ladies with hats and gloves.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> That you experienced such an event is great, but to share it with us is even better!

>

 

Hi Wendy!!

 

I did miss you all. I just wish I had been able to take more pictures, but my camera

battery died on me and I didn't have the charger!

 

> Did you touch the car that held Gable and Leigh? I would have, if given the opportunity...

>

 

You know, I don't think I did! But I did manage to get a picture of it before the camera

died. I just have to figure out how to upload it (it's not mine, I borrowed it from a friend.

When I do, I'll try to post them here.)

 

> I love that the organ had a name.

>

 

The theater had many "traditions" and personal aspects that lent it additional charm.

For instance, the man who restored the organ after it had fallen into disrepair,

did so on his own time and never charged the Fox a cent for it. In return, the

theater owners gave him the lease of an apartment in the building for life. He is now

known as the "Phantom of the Fox"! And he has just about the best address in town.

:)

 

> The restoration page of that link was very interesting and gave a good idea of whta the theatre must have looked like in it's heyday.

>

 

Can you imagine? I mean, to think you could see an opera or a ballet one night,

or Gary Cooper movie the next! And in such style! You should see the ladies lounge!

They even have the private phone booths like you see in the powder rooms in old

movies! So cute!

 

> What I like most from your missive was your description of the audience. I think you must have been with the most appreciative audience ever, with the exception of the original opening night spectators.

 

They sure were enthusiastic to say the least, and that is half the fun. To think you could

have enjoyed something like that every weekend back in 1939. There was one moment,

during one of Rhett's speeches, where I could hear the faintest echo of his voice in the

theater and I looked up at that midnight "sky" and it was just so MOVIE MOVIE that

I just soaked it all up. Now I want to see EVERY movie in one of these old palaces!!

 

Are there any in Connecticut?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Miss G, in Philadelphia, where I grew up, we had so many of these palatial theaters. All but one are gone. I get saddened every time I think of how these beautiful places were treated. I'm glad to have all the wonderful memories of seeing so many road show engagements at them, but I'd sure love to visit them again, and that's impossible. I'm so happy to hear your great story of *Gone With the Wind* and The Fox. I guess every city had a Fox Theater. I know we had one, and I saw many films there, but the theater is just a memory.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have one beauty near me, The Garde Arts Center, but it has reverted to mostly stage shows. They used to show old movies on a really GIANT screen but since they restored the theatre, they make much more money with the musicals that come in. So no more Errol, Bogie or Olivia.

 

But it is a gorgeous old dame, with rich colors and patterns, and something to look at every where you turn your eye.

 

Photobucket

 

Apparently there is also one in Waterbury, Ct. that is supposed to be spectacular.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi MissG,

 

Thanks for sharing your visit to Atlanta with us. What a wonderful experience that must have been.

 

I can't wait to see the pictures. Now did you and Robert Osborne go out for drinks? You can tell us. We won't blab. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Maven! I want to address some of the things you so wonderfully

wrote about Gone with the Wind:

 

 

> * From the beginning

> Scarletts dad tells her she wont be happy with Ashley. Everyone can see this accept Scarlett. There are none so blind as those who ...

>

 

Yes, indeed, Scarlett is stubborn and in love with her dream of Ashley and she is NOT

going to give up on it. Every one of her dreams is gradually stripped from her but the

one she clings to the longest is her dream of Ashley and all that he emotionally

represents to her (gentility, chivalry, grace and romance---all dreams). And it is

this stubborn refusal to give up that last dream which destroys her marriage.

 

It is ironic, then, that she should scold Ashley for "Dreams! Always dreams with

you. Never common sense!" She didn't realize until too late SHE was the one

who hid from happiness behind a dream.

 

> * We take the journey with Scarlett; we watch her grow from a bratty impetuous headstrong girl into a woman beaten up by life but prevailing and meeting challenges head on. Maybe a little crying and b1tching along the way...but Meeting them head on. I admire her.

>

 

I admire her, too, no question. It's what I meant in my segment on TCM when I

said I wish I were more like Scarlett because she was a survivor and

except for her one blind spot with Ashley, able to face reality and adapt, thus

saving herself, her folk, her Tara.

 

I just love her practicality. I tend to be the exact opposite.

 

> * Mrs. OHara (Barbara ONeil) was maternal and very sexy.

>

 

She's a great lady, a very great lady. You can see why Gerald O'Hara

was a little in awe of his wife, even as Scarlett was. And did you pick

up how nicely the movie shows this mother definitely favors Katie

Scarlett? She's much more solicitous of Scarlett's tears and frowns

than she is of the other two girls. And certainly she was her Pa's

favorite. This kind of attention was wrenched from her during the

war and I think she always sought to regain it because it provided

such a feeling of security. Suddenly, she was lost in the fog....

 

> * Those eyes of Vivien Leighs are amazing. Oh yeah...Bette Davis eyes prevail, but Vivien Leighs eyes (and eybrows) are sublime. They can be soft and happy, sexy, girlish and a cold steely-eyed b1tch. I love all the looks she offers us. And that smile...so flirtatious. She is absolutely beautiful. Yeah, Hedy Lamarrs my girl, but Vivien Leigh is in the role of the century and it fits her like a glove.

>

 

The quality that mitigates her naughtiness, for me anyway, is her childlikeness. She

is, essentially, a pretty little pet, meant to be spoiled. The war and poverty "did things to her"

as Rhett shrewdly said, and this is sad to see. It add an element of loss to the story, one that

Scarlett honestly owned t, as she ruefully does to Ashley in the lumber office.

 

 

> * Scarlett surrounded by all the men at the barbecue, but what does it matter when she cannot have the man she wants. A tragedy.

>

 

Indeed. "Throwing away happiness with both hands reaching for something that will

never make you happy."

 

 

> * The wooden-headed Ashley Wilkes. Man enough? I dont think he loved Scarlett. He should have just made love to her and be done with it. They really would not have been a good fit.

>

 

As Rhett, again, said: "Why can't he make up his mind?"

 

Though I stubbornly insist that I do like and even admire certain qualities in Ashley.

And I just adore the love between him and Melanie, which seldom ever inspires much remark.

I always tear up when Melanie sees his dim figure in the distance, walking wearily but

with a certain eagerness toward home and that classic (later cliche) running into each

other's arms: it just WORKS on me and I bawl every time because Olivia, especially,

makes you BELIEVE and FEEL her overwhelming JOY at having her "beloved come

home to me."

 

All things consindered, I believe they had a wonderful marriage.

 

 

> * Those eyes again. She smiles greeting Rhett when he brings Bonnie back from Europe, but when he mocks her, the hurt look in her face...her eyes. Its all there.

>

> * May I again talk of the eyes. As Scarlett watches Ashley kiss Melanie goodbye when the war begins and Johnny Reb enlists; as he rides away. Whew!!

>

 

I feel exactly the same. Vivling used every feature of that bewitching face to register about

a million different emotional changes and thoughts, but her eyes were her best and most

variable feature. This is why I insist she was MADE for the movies and should have

focused on them, as opposed to the stage. I understand and agree with her choice, though,

however it is our loss.

 

 

> * Gable as Rhett Butler. To die for...he stands so close to Leigh in many of their scenes. I feel faint watching that. Its seventy years later and I feel faint waching him standing so close to her, big, burly, with a lusty laugh and his hair so long and hands so big and eyes of slate blue. Was Lombard lucky or WHAT???!!!!

 

> * Rhett grows as well. Like Rick Blaine hes the only cause hes interested in. But eventually sees the errors of his way for the lost cause of the South. Gable as Rhett does call a spade a spade but Scarlett doesnt want to see herself as Rhett sees her.

>

> I can wax on and on about Vivien Leigh...but let me give Clark Gable some attention. OH MY GOD!!!! HES DASHING AND GORGEOUS AND LUSCIOUS AND LUSTY AND ALL OF THAT AND A BAG OF CHIPS!!! He is so handsome in his outfits. Those pants, vest and hats. Dashing did I say? He laughs at Scarlett, he wants Scarlett, he wants to spoil her, but he wants a Woman too. Yeah. Did you see how often he stood so so closely to Leigh. My pulse raced. I loved their scene on the bridge when he leaves her, Mellie and Prissy. Hes going to kiss her and she says: Dont hold me like that.

>

> Youre a heartless creature but thats part of your charm.

>

> And Scarlett still resists a man whose gone through HELL for her? I dunno girl. (Taking that buggy carriage through the train yards. Breathtaking. The flames; metaphoric for what he really does go through to get her).

>

 

EXCELLENT!! I have to admit that I now watch GWTW a smidge more to watch RHETT

than I do to watch SCARLETT. While it's true it's not the central part and that he is

only reacting to the female lead throughout, Gable makes the part come so vividly alive

that I never sense he is in any way secondary to the story. After all, it's almost a breathless

dance watching them go at each other, scene following scene leading to what we all

HOPE will be happiness. Ever since I was a kid, I can pinpoint the exact moment when

I truly want to SMACK Scarlett and it's the moment on the terrace, after her accident,

when Rhett talks to her about "giving our life together" another chance. Oh, when

she meanly says "Our life together?! When did we ever have a life together?" I just

want to scream at her. It's a great role for Gable, not what he feared, he needn't have

feared. It's a strong AND sensitive character that is just as timeless as

Scarlett's, and MUCH easier to love, at least for me! :D

 

 

> * Max Steiner is a genius. His music informs...underscores. Its rousing as the opening theme shows. It says, this film is important. And then Steiner also breaks your heart (Ashley leaving...Belle Watlings theme) I have the soundtrack so I hum along. Steiner is killer.

>

 

The music is glorious, and just hits all the right emotional notes---to an extraordinary

extent. It's astonishing that he didn't win the Oscar, though I can't diagree that Stothart's

remarkable work on the The Wizard of Oz was no slouch. :)

 

GWTW is one of those scores that uplifts, just makes you soar on its wings and that

is the best kind of music, in my opinion.

 

John Barry's score for Out of Africa affects me similarly.

 

 

> * Its heartbreaking to see Scarlett in such pain, her face stained with tears when Ashley goes off to war. Tell me you love me. Id live on it the rest of my life. Shell accept Ashleys crumbs. So sad.

>

 

It is extremely touching, she's so young and there is nothing quite as poignant and pure

as first love. If only we could get it "right" the first time.

 

 

>

> * Whose gonna milk that cow. Wes house workers. Well that says it all, doesnt it...without hitting people over the head.

>

 

I was watching that scene yesterday and something new occured to me. When

Mammy, Prissy and Pork are all watching and talking to Scarlett, it occurred to

me how they all in that moment were on the same plane. The people, who had

known what suffering was in spades, were seeing someone who had NOT come

to grips with it, someone who was never even prepared to meet the slightest

of life's hardships. They knew you have to keep going on, I think that, aside

from looking to her to take the lead in the house, they also were all feeling

the same fears. They even look alike, everyone is in worn out, worked out,

clothes, including the lady of the house. Their expressions all register

stunned loss. A remarkably orchestrated scene.

 

 

> * Max Steiner gave Belle Watling a poignancy that touched me. She also was in love with someone who loved someone else, who loved someone else. (Did no]/ui] one love someone who loved them back??? GeeZ!) The way Rhett pinched her cheek with loving familiarity. I love the way he says: Goodbye Belle and the camera stays on her. Sad!

>

 

That scene with Belle is so lovely, it's wonderful how they held on her after Rhett left. This

is one of those "intimate" scenes that make this movie so rich, making it more than just

an empty "epic". You never lose sight of the people or are their emotions ever given less

than complete legitimacy and the proper framework to express them. This is Victor

Fleming, in my opinion. It's a director's job to hit those moments where they need to be.

 

> *And a shout-out to the great Hattie McDaniel who found just the right note: Hes her husband, aint he?

>

> Shes a wise old soul and sees All. And she's given a lot of lee-way to speak her mind even with the limitations of the time. Even Rhett says it when he says that Mammy: ...is one of the few people whose respect Id like to have. I think that was positively UNHEARD in real life or in films of that time. And when Gable says it...I believe it. I smile when he has his scenes with Hattie becuz I think of them in SARATOGA.

>

 

Mammie got the most adulation in the audience this weekend. Here every appearance

was greeted with cheers and even her name when it appeared in the opening credit

got great applause!

 

 

>

> Back to the bridge: THE kiss on the bridge. Hes practically pleading, begging her to love him. No longer braggadocious or boasting or brash; quietly asking her to kiss him once. He wants to know at least just once that she loves him. Even if she pretends...for her to kiss him really. ...once. That word once is killer.

>

> She smacks him and they back to their bantering.

>

 

It's my favorite scene in the film. :)

 

 

> Gable and DeHavilland are so gentle together. I loved watching them. DeHavillands Mellie brings out Rhetts soft side. And Scarlett brings out the animal in him; but he wants to take care of her too.

>

 

I love the Rhett and Melanie scenes. I fancy somehow Rhett, perhaps subconsciously,

may see the qualities of his mother in her. The graciousness, the gentility---I mean

genuine gentitlity. Honesty is perhaps the quality he admires above all others in man,

woman, child, freeborn or slave, and Melanie is honest as well as kind. Rare.

 

>

> Do not squander time. That is the stuff life is made of.

>

 

Indeed, that is so very true.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Miss G, in Philadelphia, where I grew up, we had so many of these palatial theaters. All but one are gone. I get saddened every time I think of how these beautiful places were treated. I'm glad to have all the wonderful memories of seeing so many road show engagements at them, but I'd sure love to visit them again, and that's impossible. I'm so happy to hear your great story of *Gone With the Wind* and The Fox. I guess every city had a Fox Theater. I know we had one, and I saw many films there, but the theater is just a memory.

 

Hi John!

 

That is sad, and it surprises me that a town with so much history as Philadelphia

would let that happen. It is sad.

 

This is the first time I have watched a movie in one of these "palaces", and now

I want to see them all that way.

 

One of the Fox Theater employees told me there are, if I remember correctly, three

other Fox Theaters, the very largest one being in Detroit! No wonder William Fox

went broke!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, Wendy, that one is a jewel! There is simply nothing to beat these old time

theaters. I hate to say it, but I don't like the Met at Lincoln Center, it's just

too modern for me. And in Paris, I vastly prefer the Opera Garnier over the

others.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...