Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> Hi MissG,

>

> Thanks for sharing your visit to Atlanta with us. What a wonderful experience that must have been.

>

> I can't wait to see the pictures. Now did you and Robert Osborne go out for drinks? You can tell us. We won't blab. :)

 

Larry! :)

 

I went to a reception on Saturday where Mr Osborne also attended and I did get to chat

some with him and we were all drinking champagne so that is about the extent of our

being out for a drink! :) If he's reading this, I'll buy him one at the Oak Bar the next

time he's in town. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The one remaining one is, fortunately, going to be restored and reopened. In fact, they are planning an entire development of shops and hotels around it! It is the theater where Gone With the Wind premiered in Philadelphia. It is also where all those great Cinerama features played.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi April, :)

 

Well that sounds lovely. The whole experience just sounds like another dream come true actually.

 

 

Chris,

 

After reading what you wrote about "The Senator" I had to google it. I always get distressed when I hear things like that. I found this article on it and it has such a great story.

 

http://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/bal-al.senator19apr19,0,2667667.story

 

In Richmond we still have several surviving grand theaters, most are downtown. All but one, are mostly only for live shows now. The one exception is almost exclusively a second run movie house now. Classic films are rarely screened here anymore. We just had our first new theater in decades open inside the city limits. It's in a converted wharehouse and they do serve wine and beer in the concession. Something new to me. It's a multiplex but they have started screening classic films on Sunday afternoons. We will see if it lasts.

 

Every few months I drive my mom to one of the city cemeteries where a lot of our family rests. As we drive through the old city neighborhoods, she will point out an old neighborhood theater here and there. All of them are either abandoned or converted to other uses, but occasionally I spot a sign of their former glory hidden somewhere. These were probably never grand palaces but they do have their charm. A few even have their marquee advertising whatever they have become. One is now a laundromat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=johnm_001 wrote:}{quote}

> The one remaining one is, fortunately, going to be restored and reopened. In fact, they are planning an entire development of shops and hotels around it! It is the theater where Gone With the Wind premiered in Philadelphia. It is also where all those great Cinerama features played.

 

It makes my mouth water to think about it! How fortunate you are!

 

I saw *Giant* in L.A. at a screening in the Cinerama dome, while certainly no movie "palace",

it is a, shall we say, distinctive looking edifice! And I guess "Giant" is a appropriate

choice. It sure was fun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a multiplex but they have started screening classic films on Sunday afternoons

 

Really Larry? Classic films at a multiplex!!!? That is fantastic! I never dreamed

such a thing would happen, othere than maybe a GWTW type movie, which I did

see at a multiplex in NY not long after I moved here.

 

I hope you get to catch some, it's just so amazing to see these films on the big

screen.

 

I wish we could all afford to chip in and restore one and run it. :) We could film

the progress of our project for our own reality show. :P:P

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> It's a multiplex but they have started screening classic films on Sunday afternoons

>

> Really Larry? Classic films at a multiplex!!!? That is fantastic! I never dreamed

> such a thing would happen, othere than maybe a GWTW type movie, which I did

> see at a multiplex in NY not long after I moved here.

 

It's this chain. Here is the link to their new Richmond theater:

 

http://www.bowtiecinemas.com/new_locations.html

 

 

>

> I hope you get to catch some, it's just so amazing to see these films on the big

> screen.

>

> I wish we could all afford to chip in and restore one and run it. :) We could film

> the progress of our project for our own reality show. :P:P

 

TimeWarner are you listening? Charles Tabesh??? :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seriously, wouldn't it be a blast? We could all pitch in and paint and scrub

and polish and get Robert Osborne to the Grand Opening and I want to be

an Usherette and wear a uniform like Maggie Sullavan's in THE GOOD FAIRY!

 

And have a John Ford Festival every summer! :D:D

Link to post
Share on other sites

>After reading what you wrote about "The Senator" I had to google it. I always get distressed when I hear things like that. I found this article on it and it has such a great story.

 

It's a great place. It is a bit of an awkward drive for me but when there is a special movie or they bring an old one I try to go.

 

Among the films I have seen there are "Lawrence of Arabia" and "Rear Window" and "Vertigo" and "Spartacus." About two years ago I took my children to see "To Kill A Mockingbird."

 

It has the concrete inlays where there have been special screenings or openings. John Waters and Barry Levinson have had several films open here. I think in "Avalon" there is a small scene in front of the theater.

 

It does show new movies but with the multiplexes around it is hard for them to get contracts to show them. It isn't much of a shopping district either. It was a rare treat to go but it was fun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> Among the films I have seen there are "Lawrence of Arabia" and "Rear Window" and "Vertigo" and "Spartacus." About two years ago I took my children to see "To Kill A Mockingbird."

>

 

I would hope they were able to show 70mm prints for all or most of those movies. They look absolutely amazing in 70mm. Especially "Lawrence".

Link to post
Share on other sites

April, what a perfect way to wind up your Fan Programmer experience, by going back to Atlanta at that beautiful Fox Theatre for GONE WITH THE WIND! Your descriptions had me right there with you, including drinking that champagne, ha!

 

Can you, CineMaven, or anyone else explain to me a line I've always wondered about -- when Rhett says to Scarlett, "Heaven help the man who REALLY loves you", what does he mean? Belle says (if I correctly remember her line) that he's "poisoned" by her, besotted beyond belief, but, is that really love? Melanie thinks so, doesn't she? On her deathbead she tells Scarlett to be kind to Captain Butler, "he loves you so".

 

One of my favorite scenes is with Belle Watling in the carriage with Melanie. At first we see Belle looking almost modest and elegant as she quietly, politely, and deferentially chats with Melanie, but as the conversation turns to Scarlett, Belle lets her true emotions slip. Her voice rises, and she opens up her coat, takes out a power puff, and starts patting away. This is just such a great bit of business that instantly shows us the commonness and notoriety of, respectively, her background and her profession, even though, of course, she does have a heart of gold!

 

I love the intense, fascinated look of admiration Scarlett gives Melanie after the shooting and cover up, of the Yankee -- "What a cool liar you are, Melly".

 

I love Ward Bond's voice when he says, "Belle's?" to Rhett, after Scarlett's shantytown incident. His nervous tone as he brings up her name is simultanously familiar, embarrassed, and awkwardly official.

 

I love the look of incredulity on Mammy's face as she slowly turns her head because she can't believe what's she's hearing, as Scarlett is winding the hapless Frank Kennedy around her little finger by telling him that SueEllen has moved on and found another beau, all so Scarlett can charm him into marriage and pay the mortage on Tara.

 

I love how "modern" Viven's portrayal of Scarlett is, never more so than when she's recovering from her miscarriage after the fall down the stairs, and she's sitting outside, pale and weary and empty, watching Bonnie on her horse. Her facial expressions and body language as she's coldly and dismissively telling Rhett "When did we ever have a life together?" seems so different from the way actresses of the 1930's would say that line. There is an effortless, unadorned maturity of acting style Leigh has that I can't even explain in terms of her relationship with Olivier. He can be annoyingly mannered, while I

always find her (especially as another Southern belle, Blanche in STREETCAR) a mesmerizing blend of the natural and theatrical, with an intuitive but also intelligent understanding of character interpretation and authorial intent.

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

Link to post
Share on other sites

>I love the intense, fascinated look of admiration Scarlett gives Melanie after the shooting and cover up, of the Yankee -- "What a cool liar you are, Melly".

 

Don't ask me why, but this is my favorite scene. I am obsessed with Scarlett and Melanie's relationship. The last few times I saw the movie this part struck me almost forcibly. And I have to say that Olivia de Havilland's Melanie is a work of genius. Do you know how hard it is to play "nice"? It's excruciating.

 

The thing I love about Olivia and Vivian both is how close to the edge of the abyss they are playing. I could see them each losing their minds a bit after dealing with the war, poverty, and loss. There is a touch of madness in each performance and I like it.

 

>I love how "modern" Viven's portrayal of Scarlett is, never more so than when she's recovering from her miscarriage after the fall down the stairs, and she's sitting outside, pale and weary and empty, watching Bonnie on her horse. Her facial expressions and body language as she's coldly and dismissively telling Rhett "When did we ever have a life together?" seems so different from the way actresses of the 1930's would say that line. There is an effortless, unadorned maturity of acting style Leigh has that I can't even explain in terms of her relationship with Olivier. He can be annoyingly mannered, while I always find her (especially as another Southern belle, Blanche in STREETCAR) a mesmerizing blend of the natural and theatrical, with an intuitive but also intelligent understanding of character interpretation and authorial intent.

 

I completely agree about Leigh's acting "style". She seems to have none - no discernable "technique". Oh, I know she has it, but it isn't visible. With Olivier, I am always aware of his "technique". He must have been amazing on stage, but with relatively few exceptions, there is something cold and calculating in his approach to a role. Leigh is always warm and vibrating... she plucks her moods and emotions out of the air, and I am always amazed at her choices.... they are so unusual, and always RIGHT.

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Can you, CineMaven, or anyone else explain to me a line I've always wondered about -- when Rhett says to Scarlett, 'Heaven help the man who REALLY loves you', what does he mean? Belle says (if I correctly remember her line) that he's 'poisoned' by her, besotted beyond belief, but, is that really love? Melanie thinks so, doesn't she? On her deathbead she tells Scarlett to be kind to Captain Butler, 'he loves you so.' "

 

Well...I'm no "GWTW" aficionado like Ms. G., but I'll take a stab at it. I'm trying to remember exactly when that scene came. Probably before the kiss on the bridge, right? I think Rhett is ultimately talking about himself when he says that line. As for Belle...ma belle Belle, she's saying "poison" out of jealousy; she sees that because she could treat Rhett better than Scarlett is. As for "besotted beyond belief" I think that IS love.

 

"One of my favorite scenes is with Belle Watling in the carriage with Melanie. At first we see Belle looking almost modest and elegant as she quietly, politely, and deferentially chats with Melanie, but as the conversation turns to Scarlett, Belle lets her true emotions slip. Her voice rises, and she opens up her coat, takes out a power puff, and starts patting away. This is just such a great bit of business that instantly shows us the commonness and notoriety of, respectively, her background and her profession, even though, of course, she does have a heart of gold!"

 

You're so right about that. It does show her profession and it does show the great amount of respect she has for Melanie. I absolutely love the quiet alto voice of DeHavilland and the way she tells Belle "you mustn't say bad things about my sister-in-law." DeHavilland... The first time I saw "GWTW" at sixteen, her death scene had me crying buckets in the theater. And I was on a class trip with classmates all around me. Yeah, I'm a sisssssy. But I didn't care. Melly!!!!!

 

"I love the look of incredulity on Mammy's face as she slowly turns her head because she can't believe what's she's hearing, as Scarlett is winding the hapless Frank Kennedy around her little finger by telling him that SueEllen has moved on and found another beau, all so Scarlett can charm him into marriage and pay the mortage on Tara."

 

Hattie McDaniel did that her entire career. She was able to say volumes with her looks and tones even under the strictest of racial conditions of the time. She's amazing...and I'm so happy to read Miss G's account of the warm response Ms McDaniel received from an audience seventy years later. This was her Academy Award-winning performance.

 

I love how 'modern' Viven's portrayal of Scarlett is, never more so than when she's recovering from her miscarriage after the fall down the stairs, and she's sitting outside, pale and weary and empty, watching Bonnie on her horse. Her facial expressions and body language as she's coldly and dismissively telling Rhett 'When did we ever have a life together?'[]/i] seems so different from the way actresses of the 1930's would say that line."

 

You are wonderfully expressive in your writing Bronxgirl. I'm just trying to keep up with you and Miss Goddess. Just remember this with Vivien Leigh's acting...she's British, NOT American. Vivien Leigh gave a towering performance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Don't ask me why, but this is my favorite scene. I am obsessed with Scarlett and Melanie's relationship. The last few times I saw the movie this part struck me almost forcibly. And I have to say that Olivia de Havilland's Melanie is a work of genius. Do you know how hard it is to play "nice"? It's excruciating." - Jack Favell.

 

Can you imagine both women being in love with the same man. And don't think Melly didn't know it. On some level I believe she knew. But she believed in the goodness of her husband, and the goodness in Scarlett. She knew that Rhett would be the better man for Scarlett. She even puts in a plug for Rhett on her deathbed.

 

"The thing I love about Olivia and Vivian both is how close to the edge of the abyss they are playing. I could see them each losing their minds a bit after dealing with the war, poverty, and loss. There is a touch of madness in each performance and I like it." - JackFavell.

 

I don't see the touch of madness in DeHavilland, but Leigh throws caution to the wind and plays girlish and vixen simultaneously. I don't know if even the great Paulette Goddard could do that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

CM... Believe in the "goodness of Scarlett"? Really? I never had the impression that anyone believed in her 'goodness', but that they understood her selfish goals might not always undermine or crush theirs. And then it was OK to trust her, but otherwise, trusting in her was to trust in her achieving her selfish goals and everyone else could, well... look after themselves, too.

 

I'm not sure I could build an argument that showed examples of others trusting in Scarlett's goodness, but if you want to make me watch this film, well... I just MIGHT be willing to do that - ha ha.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ollie...if you were not convinced to watch this film after Miss Goddess' wonderful and infectious and adorable introduction (yo, Robert Osborne SAID she was adorable) then there's nothing this baby boomer can say to convince you.

 

(I used all my powers of Kismet to get new viewers for "THE LETTER".)

 

But I do believe Melanie found good in Scarlett.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Can you imagine both women being in love with the same man. And don't think Melly didn't know it. On some level I believe she knew. But she believed in the goodness of her husband, and the goodness in Scarlett. She knew that Rhett would be the better man for Scarlett. She even puts in a plug for Rhett on her deathbed.

 

I do believe that Melly thought Scarlett to be good inside. Melly believes everyone is good, and that only pure kindness would bring it out. And you know what? She is right! - her own goodness is what kept Scarlett from taking Ashley in the first place. I don't believe that Ashley couldn't be taken, he was weak and twisted up inside. Scarlett could have ANYONE she wants. But something holds her back with Ashley. And it isn't Ashley. It's Scarlett herself.

 

Scarlett simply cannot hate or ignore Melly. Melly matches Scarlett, strength for strength. She is the ONLY one in the movie to earn Scarlett's respect, except for Mammy. (Mammy could take Scarlett in two seconds. She has seen it all, and knows every trick in the book. And she would not pull her punches.) I agree that Melly knows it all. She has a prescient kind of thing going on, a kind of near-death knowledge of what is inside people.

 

As for Melanie's madness, I think back to that scene where she gives up her wedding ring for the "cause". There is a look of fervent religion or something on her face at that moment. A kind of lunatic _need_ to be GOOD. That depth of vehement passion is what I'm talking about. Scarlett is EXACTLY the same, but her needs are different.

 

> I don't see the touch of madness in DeHavilland, but Leigh throws caution to the wind and plays girlish and vixen simultaneously. I don't know if even the great Paulette Goddard could do that.

 

Totally agree!

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

Link to post
Share on other sites

when Rhett says to Scarlett, "Heaven help the man who REALLY loves you", what does he mean

 

I didn't see it last week (though I did see April) but my thought is he doesn't love her anymore, or at least for that moment. He has been worn out by her and he acknowledges she is more than a handful. So, whoever that is that REALLY loves her is going to need a great deal of grace to live with her.

 

Now that may have all changed for a short period but when he leaves he is adamant he is not coming back.

 

That is all taking the line at face value but I may be wrong.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bronxie!

 

You've stimulated some interesting discusson with your question:

when Rhett says to Scarlett, "Heaven help the man who REALLY loves you", what does he mean? Belle says (if I correctly remember her line) that he's "poisoned" by her, besotted beyond belief, but, is that really love? Melanie thinks so, doesn't she? On her deathbead she tells Scarlett to be kind to Captain Butler, "he loves you so".

 

I think, as Chris alludes to, in the scene where Rhett tells Scarlett that, he was speaking from a hurt pride or ego, or perhaps plain, old fashioned denial. He'd not been caught before, he'd never

been "a marrying man", he'd been rather vain of his record with women, I'm sure. Suddenly,

he was getting hurt and rejected. A new experience! It fed his love, though.

Rather similar to how Ashley's rejection of Scarlett fed hers.

 

Belle's response (in a later scene) seemed, to me, to be just acknowledging the facts, he was still

in love with her. Belle's a realist, she has to be, in her profession. But she also

shrewdly pointed to what was most important, the child. "The child's worth two

of the mother." I love that line, ha! And she was right, after Bonnie died, so did

Rhett's committment to sticking with Scarlett.

 

Naughty Ollie! You can't fool ME. You just LOVE this stuff. I bet you were in

Atlanta watching the movie somewhere in that audience. ha ha.

 

What Wendy and CineMaven said jibes with how I view Melanie; Melanie believes

and acts upon her beliefs in the basic good of people, but she also has come to

view Scarlett for her strengths (what she calls "good"), not her failings. If we

are all to be judged only for our flaws, who of us would stand? She really believes

that. She, unlike many, does not regard herself as better than anyone else, including

Scarlett. Because she benefitted first hand from Scarlett's own code of honor: Scarlett

kept her promise to Ashley to stand by Melanie and take care of her. I laugh to think

how few people then or especially NOW, would EVER let themselves be bound to such

a promise, especially in such difficult circumstances. Scarlett had every reason to

leave with Aunt Pitty and return home. She did not have to stay in Atlanta with

Sherman about to burn it down and with no possible way out. But Scarlett, finding out

her own strength and practicality, did find a way, via Rhett. Melanie and her baby would

be DEAD without Scarlett's honor to a promise. Beyond that, Scarlett kept them all

alive by keeping her head on her shoulders while at Tara and trying to keep everyone

fed. She did anything and everything to keep them alive and Melanie was, quite

rightfully, AWED by GRATITUDE for this.

 

These actions are the "good" in Scarlett that shine out to Melanie when she looks

upon her or speaks of her. When Mellie looks at little Beau, she knows that he

is alive only by the grace of Scarlett's strength and endurance.

 

I believe these things are the GOOD in Scarlett. She kept a promise, a promise

she HATED, but kept. Anyone who keeps a promise they are happy about does

not deserve even 1 percent of the credit as one who keeps a promise they LOATHED

giving. And she saved the skins of everyone in that household; that they were even

alive they owe to her, so yes, again, I say there was GOOD in Scarlett.

 

But a plaster saint, she wasn't. Neither was she a good wife or mother. But

she was a courageous survivor and I think much forgiveness can be extended to

her for the lives she saved.

 

Message was edited by: MissGoddess

Link to post
Share on other sites

Your reply was so touching. I loved what you said about Scarlett's promise and how many of us would keep a promise we loathed making.

 

I don't want to get off track here (just bat me aside if I do), but your words prompt me to think about something that never occurred to me before. Do you think Scarlett loved Bonnie? She must have in some way, because as I recall, she goes into a coma after Bonnie's death. Perhaps she just couldn't show it? There are moments where she seems jealous of Bonnie, but maybe also a little proud too. She even tells Rhett to watch out for Bonnie on the horse.

 

But my real question is, do you think Scarlett would be a better mother after this tragedy? Would she even attempt another baby? (I can't remember whether she can have any others).... or do you think she just faces the reality that she is not the motherly type? I could see her learning through the loss to show love for a child.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Wendy!

 

> I don't want to get off track here (just bat me aside if I do), but your words prompt me to think about something that never occurred to me before. Do you think Scarlett loved Bonnie? She must have in some way, because as I recall, she goes into a coma after Bonnie's death. Perhaps she just couldn't show it? There are moments where she seems jealous of Bonnie, but maybe also a little proud too. She even tells Rhett to watch out for Bonnie on the horse.

>

 

I certainly think she had the fundamental love for her offspring, but I also think

there was a wee bit of vanity about it. Bonnie was pretty and looked like her

and sort of was a "pet". I don't see Scarlett ever being a hands on mother,

she would always leave that to the servants and a governess. She had

several kids in the book, and it fell mainly to Mammy to care for them,

even when they had money.

 

 

> But my real question is, do you think Scarlett would be a better mother after this tragedy? Would she even attempt another baby? (I can't remember whether she can have any others).... or do you think she just faces the reality that she is not the motherly type? I could see her learning through the loss to show love for a child.....

 

I think Scarlett was very aware of the sort of quaities she lacked---she was always

comparing herself to her Mother. She knew she wasn't like her and I believe she,

in her limited way, wanted to be like her. But she discarded many qualities along

the way simply in order to survivie the ruthless and grim spectre of possible starvation

and annihilation. It left her with very, very little patience and---this is pure speculation

because I remember little of the novel---a resentment that the beautiful, easy, spoiled

life she knew as a girl was ruthlessly wrenched away. I can see her thinking to

herself that she was wronged by life, that she always meant to be a good, kind,

beloved Lady and life somehow cheated her out of that and forced her to be the

head of the house, forced to make all the harsh decisions and compromises the

others were too delicate to make. No wonder she had little patience left for kindness

or tolerance.

 

However, she would ALWAYS provide for her children, never see them starve.

That is where she is a "good" mother and there is a lot to be said for that. Melanie

fed and clothed Beau on _Scarlett's_ money.

 

As I said, the qualities that make a great survivor and provider in Scarlett, did

not necessarily make her a good wife and mother. She couldn't keep her "honor

and her kindness, too" as Ashley tried to say. She saw that as impractical. She

went too far, but her guides in life---her Mother, principally---were dead so she

had to do what _she_ alone thought was best. This is Melanie's defense of Scarlett,

too, I might add.

 

Further speculation: I think had Bonnie lived, there may have come a gradual cooling

between her and her mother. I don't see Scarlett growing old gracefully and I can imagine her

getting jealous of young Bonnie's attentions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone!

 

good day! im taking a small break from writing papers and decided to come say hi to everyone and that I MISS ALL OF YOU!!! heehee! im having withdrawl symtoms from being away from here for so long, but school has been stressful and is thankfully ending in a couple weeks.

 

but anyway, this morning i watched Along Came Jones and Bell, Book, and Candle and just had to talk about them!

 

i hope im not interrupting your wonderful GWTW chat. go right ahead! :)

 

i was so excited for seeing my Melody Jones when i woke up! heehee!

 

i hadn't seen Bell, Book, and Candle in a long time so it was refreshing to see it again this morning. i just love this movie and all its characters! Kim Novak and Jimmy Stewart are so cute when you see them kissing at the top of a tall building while its snowing! what a beautiful scene! even though she cast a spell on him, but hey, he loves her anyway! heehee! i just love watching the transformation of her going from dark clothes to light pastel clothews, when she realizes what she gave up by being in love with Jimmy. when that trar rolls down her cheek, it made me cry, b/c he was so mad at her for learning the truth and i just wanted to go to him and say, "she's in love with you, rush to her you dummy!" ;) her character is so mysterious to me.

 

what does everyone else think of the movie? we can talk abot Melody Jones if anyone wants to also. heehee!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...