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Well now feaito, tell us what you really think.

 

Hi there. CineMaven here. What a wonderful read. I was dizzy with images you created in your post. (Actually, when I playfully wrote "man-crush" I was asking about male actors, you guys liked. But I loved reading about Hedy, Gene, Irene et al, though I could never quite fully engage with Loretta Young.

 

...but in 'THE RAINS CAME' we see a different Myrna than the MGM Myrna. She suddenly became sexier, again, she regained a certain alluring quality of a desirable liberated female, not the perfect, proper wife at which she excelled. In the Fox film she looked so beautiful, so "everything"; she was beautifully photographed, lit?.you should check that one if you haven't seen it."

 

Ohhhh, but I have seen it Senor, and you are absolutely right. I remember thinking to myself..,"hey Myrna...you're a **** here." She's leaning on a chair and George Brent offers a cigarette and puts it in her mouth. I'm trying to create a movie montage of scenes for a project I'm working on and I specifically used that scene from "THE RAINS CAME." I remember wondering why she seemed different than the Loy I was used to. Maybe becuz she was the pursuer...and she put it (her desires) "out" there. In fact I thought George Brent acquitted himself quite nicely in this film. Tyrone Power...well...sorry, I was just drooling while gazing at him. He didn't need the mustache, though. Now his is a beauty that could rival Lamarr's. Ha, ha! :-)

 

"So did Gail look okay in 'THE LAWLESS'? Were the ravages of her tragic personal life catching up with her by then? I hope not." - Bronxgirl.

 

If I can jump in there and answer that one, (well it's 5:45am and I'm up) Russell looked fine in this movie. A tad more mature, but the alcohol hadn't hit her looks yet. Her eyes mesmerize me. I dunno why.

 

"I re-visited Louise Brooks through that TCM documentary narrated by Shirley Maclaine, "Looking for Lulu". Fascinating..."

 

I don't know if this is what I saw back in the 80's (what I saw was channel 13 maybe, way before TCM) but I'd love to see "Looking for Lulu."

 

 

And getting back to you feaito:

 

"Please forgive my typos and mistakes in the language, but remember that I'm not a native speaker."

 

It is quite evident you are not a native speaker. YOU [uARE[/u] BETTER! :-)

 

coopsgirl - ?The one that really befuddles me is Wendell Corey. How he ever got a single role much less a 21 year career is beyond me. I haven?t seen him do a good job yet and unfortunately he?s in quite a few movies with people I like. He had absolutely no charisma and very little acting ability....there is just no place in my book for the Wendell Corey?s of the world. He?s not even bad in a fun to watch way he?s bad in a way that makes me mad that he was cast in the film.?

 

So you don?t like Wendell Corey, ey?? I?m no fan either...but I must say I did like him in ?HARRIET CRAIG? and in ?DESERT FURY.? I thought he stood up to Crawford, and I loved the subtext between Corey and Hodiak in ?DESERT FURY.? But he is pretty blaaaah.

 

coopsgirl - ?You couldn?t pay me enough to watch John Wayne and the only film I?ll watch with Leslie Howard is GWTW. Wendell Corey might as well be Gary Cooper compared to those two.

You?ll have to excuse me if I?m coming off a little harsh, but I?m not feeling that great (the ladies will understand why)...?

 

WOW!!! W-w-w-woweeeeeeeee!!!!Have you tried a hot water bottle??

 

Bronxgirl: - ?For some reason, she (Louise Brooks) loses a bit of her hard-edged eroticism and mystique without the Dutch bob. I've seen clips with her hair pulled back, and it's just not the same...?

 

You know, it?s as simple as that sometimes. A hairdo, a mustache can change one?s perception of a star. Joan Bennett went from a natural blonde to a raven haired beauty. That Dutch bob might?ve been like Samson?s hair; once changed...the strength is gone.

 

Molo...thanxxx so much for your thoughts on Irene Dune & Myrna Loy. Wonderful, wonderful! It was well-thought out and captured their persona. Laughed at or mocked? Uhhh, no.

 

P.S. Also saw a bit of "THEIR OWN DESIRE" and I'm lovin' Norma playing polo. She's got a touch of the tomboy in her and a real "Daddy's Girl" in a coupla movies. Cut quite a figure in her jodhpurs.

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Hahahaaaa!! Angie, that's great!

 

Yes, MrGrimes, be careful what you say around the ladies---the "furies" were she-creatures

if you know your mythology. :D

 

And one of them has a stockroom of frozen ropes!

 

My weapon of choice is to force you to watch every Gary Cooper and John Ford movie ever made.

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Hey sorry if this has been mentioned before but I just noticed there is an early Ann Harding movie scheduled for tomorrow morning. *Westward Passage* from 1932. She's opposite Olivier. This would be the earliest film I've seem him in. Interesting. I'll record it.

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> CineMaven here, Senor Feaito. Yes this is one of the most active threads. I shudder to think that we almost lost it. Yea!!! We fought City Hall and we won that battle.

 

Allow me to say that I am so glad you all are still here. As I've tried to let everyone know, I am first a reader - and there's lots and lots of good stuff to read here. I haven't seen some of these movies, however, summer will be here soon and I will have extra time to catch up. Thanks, all. And keep on rambling in print!

 

PS, CM - As many times as I've seen Glenn Ford (a favorite for me), I never noticed his ears! I guess I'll have to look more closely next time. You've got me curious. The other night in *Trial*, he had a sort of crew-cut and I still just saw Glenn Ford.

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> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> Hey sorry if this has been mentioned before but I just noticed there is an early Ann Harding movie scheduled for tomorrow morning. *Westward Passage* from 1932. She's opposite Olivier. This would be the earliest film I've seem him in. Interesting. I'll record it.

 

Thanks for the tip! I've got my recorder set! :)

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> > Hey sorry if this has been mentioned before but I just noticed there is an early Ann Harding movie scheduled for tomorrow morning. *Westward Passage* from 1932. She's opposite Olivier. This would be the earliest film I've seem him in. Interesting. I'll record it.

>

> Thanks for the tip! I've got my recorder set! :)

 

The movie that precedes Westward Passage is Friends and Lovers, which is an even earlier appearance by Sir Laurence - and he's joined by Adolphe Menjou and Erich von Stroheim, too. :D

 

(From what I remember, it's a bit creaky, but definitely worth watching, if only for that amazing cast).

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Just saw the 1937 LOVE FROM A STRANGER, based on an Agatha Christie short story.

 

Frustrated office worker Ann Harding is longing for adventure and story-book romance to come into her seemingly drab existence. She plays the lottery regularly in the hopes her dreams will come true, when, suddenly, she actually hits the jackpot, much to the chagrin of her stalwart, practical, true-blue, stodgily-hunky fiance, who believes nothing good will come of the money and their future together.. Meanwhile, who comes a-knocking on her door as a possible tenant but suave, dapper, leanly mysterious Basil Rathbone, who stares off into space and makes cryptic utterances that fascinate Ann and before she knows it, he's following her to Paris where she goes to collect her winnings. He's apparently irresistible to women, even though one look at him tells you this guy is bad news, but Ann sees him as her knight in shining armor, and impulsively marries him. He takes her to live in an isolated country home away from friends, family, and phones. This should set an alarm bell off in her head, but it doesn't.

 

He's not your average husband, because most of them don't retreat into the cellar to whistle oddly, burn photographs of their wives, and listen to Peter and the Wolf. Then there are the sadomasochistic stories he relates about his traumatic war experiences, and boarding school beatings.

 

Placid, intelligent Ann takes all of this in without so much as the blink of an eye, but you've got to wonder when the lightbulb moment will click on for her.

 

With Harding, we never see the gears shifting from one emotion to the next, which in this instance is a mixed blessing, because never does a flicker of apprehension really register across her face. For all we know, her husband's worst offence might be spending too many poker nights out with the boys, rather than the nightmare he turns out to be.

 

You can't belleve how wonderfully over-the-top creepy and crazed Rathbone is here. If you thought he was manic in SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, or that GUEST IN THE HOUSE had a doozy of an ending, check this one out.

 

LOVE FROM A STRANGER is on YouTube; it's a lousy print, but stick with it for that finale.

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

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Isn't LOVE FROM A STRANGER a dilly?? I love Rathbone in this! And yes, an eight year

old child would have picked up on his rather vivid indications of insanity before Ann did.

 

In the first part of the movie she reminds me a little of the character she played in

Enchanted April, sort all dreams and her head in the clouds. Maybe that's

supposed to be why she remains in the dark so long about him.

 

Nicely creepy English style thriller.

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Whew. I made it on. Who knows how long this will last.....

 

I had a reply to some posts yesterday, but I have completely lost it. So I am only going to address one of the questions - The difference between Irene and Myrna......

 

At first glance I was going to say that Irene is more upper crust than Myrna. However, one can almost say the opposite, so I think I have to throw this argument out the window...

 

Molo's post helped me to see the difference more clearly. Loy has that aloof quality that he spoke of, but it is mostly on the surface, used as protection against those smart alecky guys who keep pestering her. There are smoldering, warm fires underneath her cool exterior. There is tons of underlying warmth in Loy. One can see her fixing her man's tie, or helping him off with his shoes when he's had one too many.

 

With Dunne, I see lots of jovial warmth on the surface, but underneath is a mostly cool person, one who has to put on the air of gal pal, but has more serious aspirations. At her worst, she is uppity and smug. At her best, she is witty and at the same time kind of sad. At heart, she is a little chilly for my tastes. I don't see her smoothing her man's furrowed brow, or taking care of him when he is drunk.

 

Dunne, for me, is an acquired taste. She looks uneasy much of the time. Loy is more immediate... I find her much more alluring, and comfortable.

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

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Well, I hope anyone who was planning on watching or recording Westward Passage did so with no problems. This is really an amazing day on TCM, with all the Olivier movies they're showing due to his birthday, then a whole evening's worth of Sean Connery's non-Bonds. And then, on the Underground, Blast of Silence, a noir that Arkadin recommended in Hot Topics.

 

Meanwhile, Dewey's B-noir fest is entering its second week this Friday, with a screening of The Hoodlum starring Lawrence Tierney, and noir fans seem to be extremely happy with all of the obscure titles he has programmed.

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Hi April,

 

*Spoilers!*

 

*This morning I watched STRANGERS MAY KISS with Norma along with Bobby but the main lead was another of those "stodgy" types, Neil Hamilton. He's always going to be "the Chief" to me,*

*ha! It's astonishing to think what a long career he had when he isn't really the most dynamic*

*actor or good looking yet he was a leading man back there for a while. At least Robert Williams*

*was a really good actor, Hamilton is always the same to me and rather dense. Pleasant, but*

*dense.*

 

That's a good description of Hamilton. I never paid much attention to him.

 

*I have seen this picture a couple of times, and I really only enjoy Montgomery and the supporting players.*

 

I did enjoy Montgomery here. He was my favorite character.

 

*The story between Norma and Neil just should have ended far differently in my opinion. I can't think why they did end it as they did, but at any rate Norma looks nice and has some gorgeous gowns.*

 

I thought the story was uninspired. :) My first impression was that Norma was making a case for not being bound by marriage, but it seems she was just making excuses. I didn't like the ending either. I would have liked for Norma to have told Hamilton off when she went to see him in Paris. It would have been a nice place to have a big Norma speech about male hypocrisy.

 

She would have had more fun and more power in a relationship with Bob but I guess the point was that what a woman might want and want she can respect create a conflict. Am I wrong here? Bob was just too obvious and needy I suppose. She had to work to keep Hamilton, though I still don't see why she would want to. I just can't see any good coming from a marriage to him. Bad move Norma!

 

*Could Ann Harding do such a part? I don't know. If she did, you'd know right from the start she'd never end up with Montgomery, he's much too playful for her seriousness whereas Norma is playful enough herself that they match. You really believe they may*

*end up together.*

 

I think Ann could have done it. You are right about her seriousness. Norma should have ended up with Bob. If it was Ann, maybe she should have just walked away from both of them. Anyway I think the best ending would have been for Lisbeth Corbin to engage in a little edgy philosophical banter at the theater, exchange a few sly glances in the direction of Marjorie Rambeau, and then go book a single one way ticket back to Europe. :)

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Oh, yeah! That's what I was writing about yesterday....

 

It completely baffles me why the studio would cast Bobby in that role of the also-ran, when he was so obviously the most charming, most handsome man, not just of the two (he and Neil "The Chief" Hamilton) but in the entire movie! I just don't understand.......

 

Did they think he wasn't good looking enough for leads?

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Isn't LOVE FROM A STRANGER a dilly?? I love Rathbone in this! And yes, an eight year

> old child would have picked up on his rather vivid indications of insanity before Ann did.

>

> In the first part of the movie she reminds me a little of the character she played in

> Enchanted April, sort all dreams and her head in the clouds. Maybe that's

> supposed to be why she remains in the dark so long about him.

>

> Nicely creepy English style thriller.

 

 

This has certainly got to be one of Basil's best performances. I've never seen him quite so, well, EMOTIONAL before, ha!

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He was very emotional, a nice contrast to Ann's cool composure. He's a fun actor to watch. One

who seemed unafraid to take a character like that (or any of his villain roles) all the way to the

limit. You've got to admire that!

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"Hey sorry if this has been mentioned before but I just noticed there is an early Ann Harding movie scheduled for tomorrow morning. 'WESTWARD PASSAGE' from 1932. She's opposite Olivier. This would be the earliest film I've seem him in. Interesting. I'll record it."

 

I'm an Ann Harding fan but this picture was for the birds. Olivier's performance was so mannered and affected. He looked like Edgar Bergen. He didn't seem suitable for the comedy. I was so distracted by the plot jumps and his character's reasons for doing things I was in a bit of pain (cries of "Oh brother") could be heard coming from my bedroom. He looked so young, like villain Oil Can Harry with that little mustache and eyeliner. He looked much better as he got older, heavier. (In "Wuthering Heights" he was so beautiful).

 

I do see what some of you have said about Harding. Aloof...like there's a wall up that you can't get through. I saw that here. I still liked her...but I saw that here. She did have a moment when she & Olivier have an argument at the end of the movie where she showed some fire.

 

I want to rack up my numbers on Harding's films, I enjoy watching her...but I do see her limitations.

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hey kathy! i have been trying to post on here for days, but everytime i get a chance,it ejects my posts. goodness!

 

FrozenRope.jpg

 

this picture reminds me of my daddy and me climbing! yay, how fun! we have never climbed in ice and snow yet, but we use all that same equipment and those thick ropes. i wanna go again! heehee!

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So sorry, don't mean to interrupt any discussions about frozen ropes (which I'm sure must come in handy! ;) ) but I just wanted to give everyone a heads-up, especially to fans of Jayne Mansfield or Dan Duryea, or anyone who likes a good noir - Dewey picked a really great movie to show today at his noir festival called The Burglar (1957), which has elements of the French New Wave and features sensational performances from both Mansfield and Duryea, and great black-and-white photography.

 

It's from Columbia, so there's always a chance it may yet show up on TCM or even make its way to DVD. It really is worth watching; I'll post more about it in the Noir forum later.

 

burglar2nq7.jpg

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Sounds like a fun film, Holly, but the alert on it might have been better served originally in the Noir Forum, where more people specifically interested in that genre would have seen it.

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Bronxie,

Sorry if I appeared a little over-enthusiastic about that one, however I really think some Mansfield fans might not become aware about this little gem if they do not hear about it here first.

 

For the folks who don't frequent that particular forum, I'd just like to mention very briefly that Dewey has done a truly amazing job programming a 2-week-long festival with many extremely rare movies, and that while not everyone may have the chance to attend, he has also put together a really fun book that is itself the inspiration for his festival. He and his wife have personally been selling the book at the festival venue, but for those not in the area, it is also available online. Check out the noir forum for more information, I think you would enjoy the book very much and perhaps others would, too.

 

f3yjr5.jpg

 

And in case anyone's wondering, I am not getting a commission or anything for recommending the book! :P

 

Seriously, it's a fun book to have, even if you aren't that big into noir, some of the stuff that's included (IIRC) also includes many popular late-night movies. It's a great piece of nostalgia!

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

> Bronxie,

> Sorry if I appeared a little over-enthusiastic about that one, however I really think some Mansfield fans might not become aware about this little gem if they do not hear about it here.

 

Nothing wrong with over-enthusiasm, but I think Mansfield fans would have been more aware of the film if you had alerted them in Hot Topics, not Movie Rambles. That would have been the way to catch their attention, not in this thread.

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