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*I'm an Ann Harding fan but this picture was for the birds. Olivier's performance was so mannered and affected. He looked like Edgar Bergen. He didn't seem suitable for the comedy. I was so distracted by the plot jumps and his character's reasons for doing things I was in a bit of pain (cries of "Oh brother") could be heard coming from my bedroom. He looked so young, like villain Oil Can Harry with that little mustache and eyeliner. He looked much better as he got older, heavier. (In "Wuthering Heights" he was so beautiful).* - CineMaven

 

Hi CineMaven,

 

*Some Spoilers*

 

 

I didn't care for *Westward Passage* either. I might have considered it boring but for the fact that I was cringing in horror at Olivier's performance. He got a little better later in the film but not much. For some reason he reminded me, in appearance and in his fitful mannerisms, of Chaplin. His teeth seemed to be jutting out too.

 

I'm glad you mentioned the plot jumps. I thought my mind was wandering again. I still don't know how they ended up at that cottage in the end. I was confused because I never caught exactly what happened to Ann's second marriage.

 

*I do see what some of you have said about Harding. Aloof...like there's a wall up that you can't get through. I saw that here. I still liked her...but I saw that here. She did have a moment when she & Olivier have an argument at the end of the movie where she showed some fire.*

 

I liked Ann's ability to impart a slow burning frustration. She comes off very natural in that respect but it does make her seem rather cold sometimes. I suppose she was one of those actresses that was made for suffering. I liked the parts on the ship the best but I was confused by the sudden coming to terms between her and Olivier. Interesting as well to see Bonita Granville as the small child.

 

We often talk of mannered actresses but Olivier shows here that men can be just as affected. Like Harlow going from *The Public Enemy* to *Red-Headed Woman* he adjusted his style but he was often a little overly dramatic for my tastes.

 

*I want to rack up my numbers on Harding's films, I enjoy watching her...but I do see her limitations.*

 

I'm going to keep exploring her films as well. She may get a role where she catches fire yet.

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Hi there Molo. You wrote: "I'm going to keep exploring her films as well. She may get a role where she catches fire yet."

 

And to this end, I would recommend "LOVE FROM A STRANGER." This was briefly discussed by Bronxgirl and MissGoddess.

 

* ?At one moment hold someone in your arms, and the next moment hold some...thing."

 

* ?A woman?s weakness is a man?s opportunity.?

 

Bronxgirl - ?You can't belleve how wonderfully over-the-top creepy and crazed Rathbone is here. If you thought he was manic in ?SON OF FRANKENSTEIN,? or that ?GUEST IN THE HOUSE? had a doozy of an ending, check this one out.?

 

MissGoddess - ?Isn't ?LOVE FROM A STRANGER? a dilly?? I love Rathbone in this! And yes, an eight year old child would have picked up on his rather vivid indications of insanity before Ann did...He was very emotional, a nice contrast to Ann's cool composure. He's a fun actor to watch. One who seemed unafraid to take a character like that (or any of his villain roles) all the way to the limit. You've got to admire that!?

 

This movie certainly was a dilly! Who couldn?t see Rathbone coming a mile away? But what I didn?t see coming was that ending. I won?t spoil it for anyone, but I?d say that Rathbone was as I have never seen him before. He could have given Renfield and that young man in the beginning of ?THE MUMMY? or that Laughton in that movie (which just aired on TCM where he kills Ray Milland), a run for their money with that maniacal laugh. Chilling. And the placid, reserved, blissfully clueless Ann Harding certainly rose to the occasion and stood with him toe-to-toe. The denouement was thrilling.

 

Nope, I didn?t see that coming. But I guess it?s ?cuz I?m not an eight year old child.

 

I wonder what it would look like had Rathbone played Prof. Moriarty... ;-)

 

Go on YouTube Molo and check this one out. Let us know wha'cha think.

 

Ooooh, one more thing about "Westward Passage" that was disturbing: Bonita Granville. They didn't write the part for a child...did they. 'Course if it's Harding's "child" the kid would be mature beyond her years.

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Looks like I didn't miss much in Westward Passage! I don't think Olivier really began to grasp movie acting until William Wyler put him through the torture of 100 + takes for each scene (I am exaggerating, a little) in Wuthering Heights. Speaking of Larry (I mean your thespian namesake, Mad Hat!) I caught a little bit of his "Van Helsing" in a 70s era Dracula movie. Frank Langella played the title role and I kept waiting for the punch line. He just wasn't scary to me! I thought it was a spoof! Olivier seemed to have the same accent from A Little Romance.

 

This weekend I watched my recording of Young Widow, a world war II era love story

that sneaked up on the schedule one morning when I just happened to be paying attention. :)

 

It stars a young Jane Russell (billed as: T.W.M.E.B. - The World's Most Exciting Brunette.

Catchy, yes?). She plays a grieving war widow who finds love the second time around.

She's a bit in over her head with the part but the rest of the cast is strong enough to provide

support---in the ablest sense of the word, they were a "supporting cast", ha! Her new love

to be is Louis Hayward who I thought at first was an odd choice but by golly if I didn't like

him MUCH better here in a contemporary part than in his costume pictures, where he never

excited me. Also in the movie are Connie Gilchrist, being as always the most sensible

sort. She and Cora Witherspoon play Jane's Aunts who live in Virginia I think (Hi, Larry! By

the way, next time a snake wanders in you just call Connie because this lady ain't afraid of

anything! :) ) Their scenes are pretty funny as Connie plays the sensible, down-to-earth aunt

who really gives good advice while Cora spends all her time telling Jane she should go lay

down in bed. Too bad these dears disappear after the first segment of the film.

 

When Jane moves back to New York City, she rooms 1940s-room-shortage-style with old

friend Penny Singleton whose husband is at sea on submarine duty (she looks so adorable

in those 40s "rompers" or jump suits that were popular) and she's full of wise-cracks. The

third roommate is the ultra blonde Marie Wilson, in the Suzanne Sommers role. :P

 

This movie is fun and sweet and very "classic lite" on the radio dial, and of interest to

anyone who loves 1940s, WWII era nostalgia because it's definitely a movie of the moment,

and soon to be outdated because if it was released in 1946, the war was soon to be over

and all the boys returning home. It's filled with references to rationing, shortages (men and

stockings) women filling the workforce, big band music, hair styles, etc

 

Plus you get to see two Howard Hughes muses for the price of one: Faith Domergue has

a small role as a jittery girl who works on the same periodical as Jane (did I mention Jane

is a reporter?!).. For an HH production starring two of his favorites, it's quite tasteful but

don't worry, lads, there are shots of Jane in a negligee and 1940s style bikini. :)

 

Cute stuff.

 

Jane, squeezing out a tear in her "big emotional scene". It's a little beyond her but

not so badly done.

young%20widow.jpg

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Hi MissGoddess, I saw most of this film. It was interesting seeing Jane Russell in not so a snarling aggressive role. Who really surprised me was Norman Lloyd. He did a great breezy job. Hard to think that was the same fellow who was Hitchcock's saboteur.

 

Louis Hayward does nothing for me.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Hi MissGoddess, I saw most of this film. It was interesting seeing Jane Russell in not so a snarling aggressive role. Who really surprised me was Norman Lloyd. He did a great breezy job. Hard to think that was the same fellow who was Hitchcock's saboteur.

>

 

Ha!! You know, I didn't bother to look up the actor's name, that's how unrecognizable

he was in this! I thought he seemed familiar but no, I never would have know it was

the same man climbing up the Statue of Liberty. Well, he might have done that in

Young Widow but for a different reason, ha!

 

> Louis Hayward does nothing for me.

 

Yes, he'll never set the Thames on fire, lol! He reminded me a bit of Dirk Bogarde here.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Louis Hayward does nothing for me.

 

Miss Maven,

I used to think the same thing about him until yesterday, when I caught Repeat Performance (1947) at Dewey's film noir festival. It's an amazing noir, and Hayward gives a wonderful performance!

 

Repeat%20Performance.jpg

 

By the way, that movie also marked the film debut of Richard Basehart. :x

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Now, you're talking!!! And it didn't hurt to see that hunky piece of beefcake...Victor Mature. He was one of my faves and Russell looks like she needed that type of guy (like Mitchum) to be opposite her.

 

Thanxx for the clip.

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I love your description of Victor -- "great big meaty guy" -- and he was a good actor too. I've enjoyed him in every movie I've seen him in.

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> > Louis Hayward does nothing for me.

>

> Miss Maven,

> I used to think the same thing about him until yesterday, when I caught Repeat Performance (1947) at Dewey's film noir festival. It's an amazing noir, and Hayward gives a wonderful performance!

>

> Repeat%20Performance.jpg

>

> By the way, that movie also marked the film debut of Richard Basehart. :x

 

Interesting, Holly, but this is not the Noir Forum.

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I love reading about Victor Mature, because he was another of those actors who didn't have any illusions about himself or his acting ability. He never thought of himself as a great actor. His quotes on the subject are quite funny - "I never was an actor; ask anybody, particularly the critics." or "Hell, I'm no actor and I've got 28 pictures and a scrapbook of reviews to prove it."

 

But he is surprisingly good in almost everything.

 

For years, I only knew him as Samson, wrestling a skinny, very fake, stuffed lion to the ground.... :) Oh the joy of it! I noticed his acting first when he underplayed and out-acted the great Richard Burton in The Robe. His best performances are in thrillers, where his big features and quiet line readings seem just right - even his quizzical thick eyebrow fits in nicely in underworld dramas.

 

I love his drippy, black hair dye in After the Fox, in which he portrays a hammy actor past his prime (which he was).

 

When asked about his last performance as Samson's dad in a TV remake of Samson and Delilah, he said, "I'd have played Samson's mother if they'd asked me."

 

He became wealthy due to investments and quit acting for the most part in the mid-sixties. "I loaf very gracefully," he commented. "There's a lot to be said for loafing if you know how to do it gracefully."

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jackie, your further descriptions of him are perfect, just perfect!

 

I first saw Victor in ANDROCLES AND THE LION as a young teen, and I knew there was something more to him than just beefcake -- his line readings were natural, measured, even introspective, and were at interesting odds with his vigorously masculine appearance. I was very impressed! I loved his tender love scenes with Jean Simmons. And I agree, he did out-act Burton in THE ROBE. I know he's versatile but I have to confess, I'm partial to him as a Roman soldier.

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

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I always thought Chris Noth could play Victor Mature's son. I laughed when I saw your subject line.

 

Loved him in "SHANGHAI GESTURE."

 

Message was edited by CineMaven becuz I just saw him in "COLD AROUND THE HEART." Best film I saw that year, too.

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> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> I first saw Victor in ANDROCLES AND THE LION as a young teen, and I knew there was something more to him than just beefcake

 

Someone once asked Groucho Marx about a movie starring Victor Mature, and Groucho said he would never go to a movie where the male star had bigger ____s than Marilyn Monroe. Sorry to butt in. Now I'll go back to screening crappy movies.

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> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> Interesting, Holly, but this is not the Noir Forum.

 

I am aware that this isn't the noir forum, Bronxie. That didn't stop you, April, Wendy, Scott and others from engaging in a very long discussion in this very thread about Guest in the House, which is _also_ a film noir. The fact that this isn't the Silent Forum didn't mean that you couldn't post a photo of Louise Brooks and mention Pandora's Box to Scott, if I remember correctly.

 

Furthermore, the point of my post (in case you missed it) wasn't what kind of movie I'd just seen Louis Hayward in, but simply the fact that I'd just seen a performance by him that really changed my impression about him.

 

This is the 2nd time today that I have felt attacked personally by you with criticism of posts that, as far as I can see, were on-topic and completely respectful. I respectfully ask that you do not turn other people's threads into fight threads due to any possible personal dislikes that you may (or may not) have.

 

Thank you.

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JackFavell - "I love reading about Victor Mature, because he was another of those actors who didn't have any illusions about himself or his acting ability..."

 

Well if you love reading about Victor Mature, let's talk about him in (Fox Movie Channel's 9:00 am screening of) "CRY OF THE CITY" Tuesday morn. You know where to find me. ;-)

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> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> You mean it wasn't "Head"? I guess not.

 

Ha! What is "Head"? I never heard of it. I would think Victor Mature would appear

more properly in a movie entitled "Lips". :P

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"Head" is The Monkees one time venture into a film. I think "bizarre" is a more pleasant way to put the description. Mature had a small part as a studio executive.

 

The four lads were trying to make some fun of their success and the way they were handled but it didn't come off too well.

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Vic played a studio head? Lol! That's pretty funny. I can't think of anyone less like a studio "mogul".

 

I was watching an episode of the "Dick Van Dyke Show" where they had this British pop duo who seemed to behave and sound in the style of the Monkees. I used to watch their TV show when I was little, they were adorable. I love this song:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfuBREMXxts

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