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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Once again, you and Bronxie have got me laughing so hard I spit my drink out.....

 

I think if Vic had a drink he'd have spit it out a few times during this evening. I don't

know, it just looks all so funny. Marilyn looks like she's rehearsing what to say, just

as she did as "Elsie Marina" in The Prince and the Showgirl when she was introduced

to Olivier's Mother-in-Law, who was an Empress or something.

 

QueenElizabethpresentation.jpg

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I saw a wonderfully (predictable) but quiet and strong film (on Fox Movie Channel...ooooh!) called "HAPPY LAND." It starred Don Ameche and the luminously beautiful Frances Dee.

 

Hey Theresa!

 

Interesting movie you pointed out, if you dont mind i'd like to chat with you about it.

 

CineMaven here. If you don't mind chattin' I don't mind ramblin'.

 

This movie is such a heartfelt picture full of emotion and love that just grabs at you. it did that for me, and im surely it did that for you too.

 

You're quite right about that. The emotional wallop of the movie snuck up on my heart. I was teary-eyed by the end of things. That Rusty as a little kid was cute as the dickens, wasn't he? I didn't think Ameche would really give his hide a tanning when he refused to listen to Dee about taking the dog to school. But he did...

 

This movie started so sad for me and wasnt sure if i would really like it, but found myself wanting to see more concerning the reaction and relationship between (Ameche) and (Dee), even thought they seemed to have focused mainly on Ameche's reaction quite a bit more, which i was annoyed with as well. they were so emotional in this movie, especially Ameche, but not like you would think at all. it was sometimes a suttle grief that really fit his personality well, which i was pleased with.

 

The movie made me think of "THE HUMAN COMEDY" with the track & field and the telegram delivery and small-town Americana. I did want to see a little more of the Ameche-Dee relationship. But that was not the p.o.v. of the story. The focus was this boy's life and how the War and tragedy touches Everyday Average Joes who made the ultimate sacrifice.

 

Why were you so disappointed that they made Frances Dee so matronly. i think its cute in her movies when she is matronly like also in Because of You as Loretta Young's good friend. but i do haave to agree with you....every time i see her name in the credits of a movie, i look for her, b/c i always know she will hold my attention. she definitely always give a great performance.

 

I was disappointed in Dee's matronly appearance becuz besides being a *snarky gal...I'm shallow too. Yeah, I had a selfish moment there. But I got over myself and realized that for the sake of the story, this had to be. (You've got to catch her in "MEET THE STEWARTS.") I did get into her performance. Quiet, natural. And even with the slightly matronly appearance, it is impossible to hide her beauty. (See "SO ENDS OUR NIGHT"). I liked the sweet way she said goodbye when she was on the train. I liked the close-up given when her son kisses her full on the mouth leaving on her the lipstick of the girl (Cara Williams) left on his lips. Watch her, she's listening and not telegraphing her performance.

 

But I guess the story hinges on Richard Crane playing Rusty, who holds it all together. He was attractive, likeable and gave a very natural delivery.

 

Didja notice Darla Hood playing Ann Rutherford as a child?? I hope everyone can check out this wonderful slice of American life in the 1940's. Everyone gives a solidly good performance.

 

*As for snarky...not really. I just like to poke fun at hypocrisy.

 

And P.S. If your post gets buried or snowed under, just send me a PM to let me know where to find ya.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Miss G. and jackie, Victor looks like he actually wants to look down ELIZABETH'S dress.

>

> And the little guy with her looks like he's about to pop his monocle...

> QueenElizabethpresentation2.jpg

 

 

heeheeheehee. Or something.

 

Provocative dynamics in that picture with all four of them, don't you think?

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Hey Butterscotchgreer & CineMaven,

*Happy Land* was a movie that I recorded awhile ago, but thanks to your endorsements only started watching yesterday. I thought Don Ameche gave one of his better dramatic performances in this one, and thought that his bitterness and grief were very moving, (though I usually prefer him as the hiliarious Mr. Bickerson and in the films as he got older). The best parts for me were the beginning with the narrator describing the community life, and *Ameche* and *Dee* bantering tenderly and the arrival of the telegram. I saw some echoes of the author MacKinlay Kantor's later poetic touch in *The Best Years of Our Lives* in this movie too, (though of course, Robert E. Sherwood refined that story beautifully in the Wyler film). I loved seeing *Harry Carey* as Gramps' spirit in *Happy Land*!

Image Hosting by PictureTrail.com

 

Did anyone spot *Natalie Wood*'s first time in front of a camera? She was the little girl whose ice cream cone fell in a very brief scene. The director of H.L., former actor and sometime director *Irving Pichel* spotted her in a crowd with her mother (who seems to have been the stage mother of all time), was enchanted by the child, and later asked that she be cast in *Tomorrow Is Forever* as Orson's war orphan. Btw, any movie with the great *Mary Wickes* in the cast is better for it, don't you think?

 

Btw, *Happy Land* (1943) can be seen in its entirety on Hulu, starting [here|http://www.hulu.com/watch/64845/happy-land]. Thank you for making me take a good look at this movie.

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HELLOOOOOOOOOOOO Miss Finnie!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Thank you so much for posting that link to this film.... I am so excited!! I just watched the first part of it.. and will come back later to check out the rest. I am hooked already. (PS... Hulu... who knew??? ha. I have only ever heard of it once before.... and did not even know what it was... ha. Thanks again!) :-)

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Hi there Finnie. I didn't notice Natalie Wood but I did notice Darla Hood. She played Ann Rutherford as a little girl. Hey, I didn't know that this Irving Pichel is the same Irving Pichel who played a manservant to one of those monsters. His hair was parted in the middle and he had a Russian Tea Room shirt on.

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Hi there Miss Finnie, Miss Maven, (and little Miss Butterscotchie too),

 

I finally sobbed my way through the rest of Happy Land... (OH.... what a misleading sort of title..ha)

 

A very touching story. Very inspirational too. I thought it was a nice remembrance of an era that has been both idealized and also longed for (at least on my part) for its themes of family, commitment, and yes... even sacrifice. Or maybe rather a knowledge of what is truly worth living (and maybe even dying) for. I guess what I am saying about this little town (and its folk) is something close to what I think you referred to as well, Miss Maven... how it may simply represent the image so many folks have of small town life way back then. At any rate... I found it comfortingly sentimental.

 

I also enjoyed all the intersting characters that passed through their lives. (the little old lady insisting on her "tonic" instead of vitamins,the one grouchy old man who only wanted LEW to fix his medicine, the two little boys in Rusty's kindergarten class, the lovely (yet shallow) Gretchen...oh and Old Ben... (did you notice that was Leigh Whipper from The OxBow Incident??)

 

Speaking of that...

 

Harry Morgan... wow. I was NOT prepared for him when he showed up. I thought that whole ending would go a totally different route. And WHAT a pup.

 

If I am not mistaken... this film came out the same year as TOBI... but he looks FAR and AWAY so much younger and innocent (puppish, if you will) in this film. What a little fresh face... and yet JUST the right amount of sadness and "hungry for something better out of life".... all at the same time.

 

When Frances gave him that big hug and a kiss at meeting him.... UGH!!!! My mom radar went into OVERDRIVE... great heaving wooshy eyed sobs... what can I say.. I am a sucker for those "mom" moments.. ha.

 

Anyway... Just wanted to say THANKS again for bringing this one up. Maybe not a GREAT film... but a nice way to pass the time..

 

And PS... I have to say again... Hulu?? Who knew??? Pretty cool. Thanks again, Moira, for the link there. :-)

 

Message was edited by: rohanaka

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HEY...Miss G!!!

 

*The Body Snatcher*... OH MY GOLLY!!!!! (I think it is my NEW favorite for Boris Karloff... EVER!) :-) Delightfully CREEPY!!!!!!!!!!!! (and I mean that in a GOOD way!! ha)

 

And PS... Boy, oh boy... talk about hitting both ends of the spectrum today w/ this movie and Happy Land... ha. I am feeling a bit... mentally "pulled apart" right now... (Sad but true... it wouldn't be the first time... and also sad but true... it likely won't be the last as well... ha.)

 

Did I mention OH MY GOLLY???????? :-)

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Hi Ro! Looks like I just missed you. So glad you enjoyed the Toddy and Grey show! :) I watched about ten minutes of it in between viewings of the 1941 and 1961 versions of BACK STREET.

 

Wasn't Henry Daniel great, too? I really love seeing him in a more developed character. Still a kind of bad guy but you see his human side too (and he actually has a girlfriend, ha! Who likes him even! Ha haa!) I just relish his scenes with Boris, they are amazing, just amazing. And the poor little street singer, oh, I just cry to hear her sing even before anything happens---the way she sang sounded so mournful and sorrowful, you just knew something awful was going to happen...

 

I have a bunch of DVDs I'm working through, and one of them I just have to quickly mention because I never even heard of it until a kind gentleman sent me a copy. It's called THE LOST MOMENT (1947) and it's based on Henry James' "The Aspern Papers", a story I'd read long ago but never realized it had been filmed, at least not this early. Susan Hayward stars and in spite of my occasional annoyance with Robert Cummings in other films, he was good here.

 

At first I was curious how Susan would be in a period setting, I never saw her in one before and thought maybe she'd be too "contemporary" to fit well but I was wrong. At any rate, in 1947 she was bloomingly beautiful and her emotional intensity actually suited to the time and her character beautifully. It's a great part, she gets to play a rigidly uptight and severe young woman as well as a soft, dreamy eyed romantic. I won't give away the details, in case TCM gets wise to this little gem and shows it sometime. It's alternately eerie, suspenseful and romantic in the Rebecca, My Cousin Rachel, Dragonwyck vein of the period. I sometimes think the early 40s was the "golden age" of this kind of eerie-romance film.

 

Oh, and Agnes Moorehead appears in the movie, too, but I won't say who she plays. Part of the fun is figuring it out. ;)

 

More about the "Back Streets" later. :)

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

>

> I have a bunch of DVDs I'm working through, and one of them I just have to quickly mention because I never even heard of it until a kind gentleman sent me a copy. It's called THE LOST MOMENT (1947) and it's based on Henry James' "The Aspern Papers", a story I'd read long ago but never realized it had been filmed, at least not this early. Susan Hayward stars and in spite of my occasional annoyance with Robert Cummings in other films, he was good here.

>

> At first I was curious how Susan would be in a period setting, I never saw her in one before and thought maybe she'd be too "contemporary" to fit well but I was wrong. At any rate, in 1947 she was bloomingly beautiful and her emotional intensity actually suited to the time and her character beautifully. It's a great part, she gets to play a rigidly uptight and severe young woman as well as a soft, dreamy eyed romantic. I won't give away the details, in case TCM gets wise to this little gem and shows it sometime. It's alternately eerie, suspenseful and romantic in the Rebecca, My Cousin Rachel, Dragonwyck vein of the period. I sometimes think the early 40s was the "golden age" of this kind of eerie-romance film.

>

> Oh, and Agnes Moorehead appears in the movie, too, but I won't say who she plays. Part of the fun is figuring it out. ;)

>

> More about the "Back Streets" later. :)

 

I am glad you liked it April. It's been one of the biggest discoveries I made last year. Since I have the Citadel Press book "The Films of Susan Hayward" I always wondered about this eerie film and it did not disappoint me at all, on the very contrary. Director Martin Gabel made a very fine job and Susan Hayward is terrific.

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> {quote:title=feaito wrote:}{quote}

> It's been one of the biggest discoveries I made last year. Since I have the Citadel Press book "The Films of Susan Hayward" I always wondered about this eerie film and it did not disappoint me at all, on the very contrary. Director Martin Gabel made a very fine job and Susan Hayward is terrific.

 

Hola Fernando!

I remember seeing this movie a long time ago, and liked it very much. I think it's a shame that this is the only movie Martin Gabel ever directed.

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> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> Apology accepted, Holly. Life is tough for all of us. I hope your family health crisis will resolve itself into a positive situation.

>

> So let's begin fresh and see what develops.

 

Thank you so much, Bronxie. You don't know how much your kind words mean to me. It is not easy to see a loved one go through a double mastectomy, then have to have yet another surgery for something totally unrelated. It can be a very scary situation, but slowly things seem to be getting back to normal.

 

I see that others have already talked a bit about The Body Snatcher, which I watched on TCM last night. (I posted briefly about it in another forum last night, but I was so tired that I barely gave it any effort).

 

It's a great classic horror film, which gripped me from the very beginning and never let go. There is no question that Boris Karloff thoroughly dominates the movie, and is perhaps the best reason to watch it, especially in the scene with Bela Lugosi. (RO mentioned offhand that this is one of several movies that Karloff and Lugosi made together, but I don't remember offhand if I've seen any of the others).

 

Much of the credit, of course, also goes to Robert Wise, who'd graduated from editing duties at RKO and was starting to direct (this was his 2nd feature). It is a very atmospheric movie, and although I suspect it must have filmed in a backlot, the illusion is very compelling from the start, especially in the night scenes.

 

There are some very heartbreaking moments in the movie, especially the one involving the little girl who needs to be operated on so she can walk again (wonderfully played by Sharyn Moffett). There's also the grisly matter of what happens to the street singer played by Donna Lee, in what is for me one of the most frightening moments of the movie, when you see what John Gray is truly capable of, how evil a monster he really is.

 

The ending is wonderfully creepy, especially since it involves seeing someone you thought had already exited the picture, and it works marvels at creating a sense of supernatural fright.

 

When all is said and done, of course, one is relieved that the young doctor Fettes (Russell Wade) has survived through the ordeal, and hopefully come out much wiser for it.

 

It is a great horror movie, from a director who isn't usually associated with horror movies, and Karloff is unforgettable in it.

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I wrote this mini-opinion on "The Lost Moment", last year when I watched it; It may contain **mild spoilers**:

 

But the film which made this weekend worthwhile was one I recorded off Cinecanal Classics: "The Lost Moment" (1947), an eerie, gothic atmospheric, mysterious film based upon a Henry James novel titled "The Aspern Papers".

 

 

I have not read James' novel but the film is truly enthralling and absorbing, with an intriguing plot and very good performances. It is the kind of film that captures my attention completely making me forget the world.

 

 

It is set in Venice where an American publisher arrives -disguised as writer- in order to obtain some mysterious letters that were written by a famous poet of the first half of the XIXth Century to a beauty of her day, Juliana Borderau, the daughter of famous painter, who is still living in the very same house in which she met the author and who is 105 years old. She lives with her young niece, Tina Borderau, who's deftly portrayed by Susan Hayward.

 

 

Agnes Moorehead plays the 105 old legendary beauty and Robert Cummings the publisher. The film builds into a long awaited climax and is just fantastic in my humble opinion. I wasn't disappointed by the high expectations I had. The B&W cinematography and the camera work are very good. The story unfolds at a perfect pace and the yearning never stops until the end. The film has that definite melancholy quality I love.

 

 

Agnes Moorehead is utterly believable as the very old woman, underneath lots of make-up. Her voice truly sounds like that of a very old lady.

 

 

I loved this film and I feel it is quite irrelevant if it's faithful or not to its source or if it is a succesful adaptation of the novel to the screen (I read some comments regarding this matter on the net)-after all, I think it's almost an impossible task to translate a Henry James novel to the screen and please everybody-, because as a film, in its own right, it is a lost gem.

 

 

It was the only film that was directed by Martin Gabel, who was also an actor and co-starred with Tippi Hedren and Sean Connery in Hitchcock's "Marnie" (1964).

 

 

It will be definitely a film I will revisit many times

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Hola, Feo!

 

I agree about book to movie adaptations, at least so long as it isn't a story I'm really, really partial to. You know what other James story this one reminds me of? "The Turn of the Screw" and I thought its screen version in Deborah Kerr's The Innocents was just as well done as The Lost Moment. Both have a similar, haunting attraction and I feel they captured the essence, at least, of the stories. And both feel more effective in black-in-white.

 

Martin Gabel---his name was so familiar and then you say he was in Marnie? Was he "Mr Strutt"? Wow! I didn't know he ever was a director! That's remarkable because this movie is very professional and accomplished---he should have continued in that path, I must say.

 

Here again is the YouTube link for any who are interested in seeing The Lost Moment:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mLtk9Njjfk

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Hola, Feo!

>

> I agree about book to movie adaptations, at least so long as it isn't a story I'm really, really partial to. You know what other James story this one reminds me of? "The Turn of the Screw" and I thought its screen version in Deborah Kerr's The Innocents was just as well done as The Lost Moment. Both have a similar, haunting attraction and I feel they captured the essence, at least, of the stories. And both feel more effective in black-in-white.

>

> Martin Gabel---his name was so familiar and then you say he was in Marnie? Was he "Mr Strutt"? Wow! I didn't know he ever was a director! That's remarkable because this movie is very professional and accomplished---he should have continued in that path, I must say.

>

> Here again is the YouTube link for any who are interested in seeing The Lost Moment:

>

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mLtk9Njjfk

 

Hi April,

 

Yes he was Mr. Strutt. When I watched this film I searched Gabel on the net and realized that this was Gabel?s only directorial effort; a pity. He was also an Associate Producer in Hayward?s ?Smash-Up the Story of a Woman? (1946).

 

And I agree about ?The Innocents?, a masterpiece.

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Yes he was Mr. Strutt. When I watched this film I searched Gabel on the net and realized that this was Gabel?s only directorial effort; a pity. He was also an Associate Producer in Hayward?s ?Smash-Up the Story of a Woman? (1946).

 

Interesting man! I guess he just didn't like directing, I can't imagine he wasn't offered more

opportunities after The Lost Moment. Looks like he played a significant part in Susan

Hayward's career.

 

I watched her version of Back Street yesterday---I can't say it was as good as the

1941 version with *Boyer* and *Margaret Sullavan*. I'm not crazy about the earlier one

with Irene dunne, either. In fact, it's not a story I'm all that fond of but at least in the '41

version there was both delicacy and honesty, not to mention great acting. Going back

to that issue I thought of regarding Susan Hayward and whether she would fit comfortably

in a period setting, I have to say that Sullaven didn't seem quite as much at home in

such a setting. Perhaps it was her wardrobe---she seemed positively over-dressed and

overwhelmed by her costumes---her petite face was almost lost in between massive

hats and huge puffed sleeves! And she is truly very 20th century to me in her cerebral

quirkiness, so I'm not sure period dramas worked for her. Only her commitment to the

self-sacrificing aspect of the role made it work.

 

The Susan Hayward version is a bit tawdry and a real "sudser" and not necessarily

in the best taste. I usually enjoy *Ross Hunter's* glossy extravaganzas, but this one

didn't gel for me. I can just see him visualizing HIS version of the Fannie Hurst classic:

"my heroine isn't going to be some frumpy dressed nonentity sitting around waiting

on her man---she's going to be a glamorous, successful fashion designer swathed

in furs and fabulous clothes and living in a gorgeous apartment that will make all the

women in the audience green with envy!" lol!

 

Susan took all the glamour and soapiness to heart which left little room in that

organ for any genuine emotion or feeling. I never saw her so over-the-top since

her embarrassing appearance in Valley of the Dolls.

 

And poor *Vera Miles* was stuck playing the wife, now made out to be an alcoholic ****

and of course, bitterly abusive to poor wimpy John Gavin. Makes you wonder why

Hayward would even care if Gavin ever turned up again. He was very good looking,

but seemed to be at the mercy of all the women and children in this movie, playing

his role for sympathy. At least in Boyer's version, his character is shown to be just

what he was: a selfish, normal man trying to have it all.

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> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> I haven't seen CRY OF THE CITY in a long time. The only thing I remember is Hope Emerson massaging Richard Conte, or was I having a nightmare?

 

That scene is definitely one of the most memorable in the movie, I think.

 

I finally caught up with it; overall, I think I liked this material better when it was called Manhattan Melodrama, but this Robert Siodmak film is still worth watching, especially for fans of crime & noir - there's good performances here by Mature and Conte, and a very early role for Shelley Winters (I've seen very few of her movies from the 40s).

 

Watching this one only about a week after New York Confidential, in which Conte also played a NY mobster, I am inclined to think that as good as he was to begin with, he would definitely get better with the years, obviously culminating with his role as Don Barzini in The Godfather.

 

Overall, Cry of the City probably isn't as impressive a movie as Siodmak's The Killers, which he'd made just two years before, but it still has some good moments.

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Feaito, I often wonder why I enjoy so many of the older versions compared to new improved versions. I think "want to" is part of it. First, I might WANT to like the original or, rather, the first one I've seen. Perhaps I've spent so much time with it that its scenery and construction seem native and anything 'different' is off-putting or disruptive.

 

I also think "want to" comes from the filmmakers. I've seen so many remakes where filmmakers obviously don't want to make a superior product - they refuse to get the budgeting to improve it, they refuse to use the budgeting if they DO get it, they refuse to improve the story, dialog, acting - whatever.

 

That's their "want to" factor. I see that far more often than suspecting my "want to" is the source of my dislike for remakes. When I find remakes that I enjoy, I also see those films have plenty of "want to" factors by the filmmakers. It's easy to appreciate their attempts to change and/or improve. Otherwise, I've never been sure why filmmakers have to waste money financing lesser efforts. Is this The Producers Syndrome? "We'll sell 900% of a project and create a total flop!"

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*CineMaven here. If you don't mind chattin' I don't mind ramblin'.*

 

likewise!

 

You're quite right about that. The emotional wallop of the movie snuck up on my heart. I was teary-eyed by the end of things. That Rusty as a little kid was cute as the dickens, wasn't he? I didn't think Ameche would really give his hide a tanning when he refused to listen to Dee about taking the dog to school. But he did...

 

youre telling me! you know, when i look at Ameche, i dont see the macho man who would wallop a kid no matter what, so when i saw that in the movie, it sort of shocked me too. i see Ameche as the tender guy who punishes by means of giving a talking to the kid ya know? maybe that doesnt make any sense. heehee! but i guess that side of Ameche is part of what made his character for me that just isnt usual in my eyes when i watch a movie if his. i guess his character makes this movie really special for me. what about you?

 

*The movie made me think of "THE HUMAN COMEDY" with the track & field and the telegram delivery and small-town Americana. I did want to see a little more of the Ameche-Dee relationship. But that was not the p.o.v. of the story. The focus was this boy's life and how the War and tragedy touches Everyday Average Joes who made the ultimate sacrifice.*

 

oh my goodness! i can see that too! The Hman Comedy is very similar is terms of culture and backgrounds, but i think the characters are what made it so different. and im really with you on the fact that i really really wanted to see more Ameche-Dee love going on. i know, im way to mushy, but thats what makes it teary eyed for me. heehee!

 

I was disappointed in Dee's matronly appearance becuz besides being a *snarky gal...I'm shallow too. Yeah, I had a selfish moment there. But I got over myself and realized that for the sake of the story, this had to be. (You've got to catch her in "MEET THE STEWARTS.") I did get into her performance. Quiet, natural. And even with the slightly matronly appearance, it is impossible to hide her beauty. (See "SO ENDS OUR NIGHT"). I liked the sweet way she said goodbye when she was on the train. I liked the close-up given when her son kisses her full on the mouth leaving on her the lipstick of the girl (Cara Williams) left on his lips. Watch her, she's listening and not telegraphing her performance.

 

yeah ive seen Dee in *So Ends Our Night* and through part of *Meet the Stewarts* and i loved her in both. i wish i could have seen the end of *Meet the Stewarts*. its been driving me crazy. heehee! i really loved how she portrayed her character in *So Ends Our Night*, (marie steiner) as the strong wife . now THIS movie is heartwrenching. oh my goodness, it really hits you in the face what can and probably did happen during world war 2, like in *Mrs. Miniver*, but the difference is that i cry a lot more to *Mrs. Miniver*. heehee! i rather like Greer in the matronly characters too. to me, that is so appealing for those two.

 

have you seen Dee in *A Man Betrayed* opposite John Wayne? although she doesnt play a mother here, i just love her as the love interest for The Duke. they make such great chemistry together and her performance is solid, but then again she always nails her performances. the plot has the perfect blend of a mystery and good mushy romance too. its such a good movie! you have to see it!

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"i guess his character makes this movie really special for me. what about you?"

 

I'd have to say Ameche made the movie for me. It was his grief, and his relationship with his son that was the whole movie. Very touching.

 

"have you seen Dee in A Man Betrayed opposite John Wayne? although she doesnt play a mother here, i just love her as the love interest for The Duke. they make such great chemistry together and her performance is solid, but then again she always nails her performances. the plot has the perfect blend of a mystery and good mushy romance too. its such a good movie! you have to see it!"

 

I have not seen this film. I'll have to be on the lookout for it. Guess she's had practice dealing with long, tall, cowboys. If I had to choose a leading lady for John Wayne, I wouldn't go with Claire or even Gail. I'd have to go with Ella Raines in "TALL IN THE SADDLE." That's just my opinion.

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Hiya April...

 

A few more words about The Body Snatcher if I may....

 

Wasn't Henry Daniel great, too? I really love seeing him in a more developed character. Still a kind of bad guy but you see his human side too (and he actually has a girlfriend, ha! Who likes him even! Ha haa!) I just relish his scenes with Boris, they are amazing, just amazing. And the poor little street singer, oh, I just cry to hear her sing even before anything happens---the way she sang sounded so mournful and sorrowful, you just knew something awful was going to happen...

 

You are right on about Daniel. (though I can't place him in anything else at the moment) He DID have a lovely "girlfriend/wife" who seemed to genuinely care about what happened to him. And he DID do a great job of playing the poor beleaguered (yet just BARELY better than Gray) guy...

 

But I have to comment again on Karloff. I don't think I have EVER seen him so CONVINCINGLY evil. I know... he has played a LOT Of "bad guys" and "monsters" in a LOT of other films... but OH MY GOLLY.... what a menace. What a MEAN and just down right pathological sort of ghoulish low life thug. He was a guy that took just a LITTLE TOO MUCH pride in his "work" for sure. (Ha.. but then again... I guess... so was Daniel if you think about it... but only for a different reason).

 

OH and regarding the victims.... you can always tell how MUCH I am enjoying almost any movie by the way I start talking to the characters while they are on TV... HA!.

 

(mini spoiler)

When that sweet little singer starts to walk past the house... and old Mr. Gray is looking at her.. you can see the "lightbulb" moment happening on his face. And then... OH MY GOLLY... I started shouting ... "RUN!! Run for you life..." Of course she couldn't hear me... she was too busy singing. Ha!

 

And then when JOSEPH (played quite nicely by Bela Lugosi, by the way) shows up later on and starts demanding MONEY... and Gray seems to be open to the whole idea of taking him on as a partner and offering him a drink and handing him cash... while he is ALSO at the same time sitting there telling him how he had previously "taken care of" men who had tried to take money from him in the past... OH MY GOSH!! I started yelling again..."Joseph... you're an IDIOT!!! Get out now while you still can!." But again... he wasn't listening either... (he was probably too busy thinking about all that money.. HA!)

 

And then... when Fettes decides to go to the cemetery w/ MacFarlane.... close to the end of the movie... well... by then I was throwing my sofa pillow at the tv set... And then when all the "stuff" started happening during the ride back home and you could tell old MacFarlane was ?losing it?.... I started thinking.... "GET OUT Fettes?. It?s a nice night for a WALK!!" Ha.. at least THAT all turned out ok (for Fettes anyway) :D

 

I looked up the short story by Stevenson after watching this.. and it is WAY different (in almost EVERY respect) from the film. But I like the FILM so much better. The characters are WAY more developed and you get a better feeling for the motivation behind much of what they do... AND.... Fettes is a MUCH better sort of fellow w/ a more likeable "future" in this movie than he is in the short story.

 

For anyone who wants to compare... here is a link. It is a short (but fun) read... but again... this is one time where I like the movie better...

 

http://gaslight.mtroyal.ca/body.htm

 

And PS... I want to thank you for posting that link to The Lost Moment... I finished watching it... and WOW... I just LOVED it. What a WONDERFUL story... very "captivating". Once I started watching it... I had to keep hitting the next part and continue on... I did not have it in me to walk away and come back later. I wanted to see what was going to happen next. And I really enjoyed Agnes Moorehead (she is ALWAYS good) And boy oh boy... that Susan Hayward... HOW GORGEOUS.... and "creepy" too (at least there for a while) all at the same time. And I am not much of a Cummings fan either... but I thought he did a VERY fine job in this one.

 

Boy... this watching movies on the internet is starting to turn into a habit... (but I'm liking it!) ha.

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