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>*Rohanaka*: Ha... with Miss Favell's permission I say... take her she's yours!! ha. I'll stick w/ "The Real Thing" Jackie just posted..ha. But you will likely have to fight off Molo and Frank for her as well.

 

Time to sharpen my sword?

 

>*Molo*: Careful Laffite! That dame has your number...and it's up! :D

 

They always have my number?

 

>*Jackie*: I can't even say what I am thinking. Something about pirate booty. :)

 

Pirate booty can be a fascinating subject :D

 

>It's all right with me, Laffite--- I am going to capture Ben and stow him away on my own ship..... you can have the girl.

 

Actually, it was the coke I wanted?honest? :D

 

>Did I go overboard with that last comment?

 

We are throwing lines over the side for you. Pirates are not averse to actually saving people?once in a while, anyway. Oh wait, belay that order! No one overboard at all.

 

>*Cinemaven*: Aaah...Coke. Boys...quench your thirst.

 

Actually, I think I?ll go back to the rum, my quenching of preference. :)

 

//

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  • 3 weeks later...

Okay. I'll get my thoughts together and start something up today. (Unless you have something you want to start about it.) There are a couple of screen caps I want to try and add through the discussion. I want to be a pro at it like you.

 

Great.

 

Edited by: movieman1957 on Nov 10, 2009 1:27 PM

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A lovely, gentle comedy from the pen of Preston Sturges and the directorial talent of Mitchell Leisen "Remember The Night" holds a warm spot in my heart. More on that later.

 

The story involves District Attorney Fred MacMurray prosecuting shoplifter Barbara Stanwyck for her crime. MacMurray thinks it is a good idea to have the case postponed until after the Christmas holidays. Stanwyck is not thrilled. Fred feels bad and has her bailed out. Having nowhere else to go she turns up at Fred's place. He is not thrilled because he is on his way to visit his mother in Indiana.

 

Thus begins a "road" picture of a different kind. They find out they are both from Indiana and since Barbara has nowhere else to go Fred invites her along. Barbara finds out not everyone is like her or her New York City citizens. Fred finds out not everyone who has a past is like they seem. Falling in love with someone on opposite sides of the law can be a problem for both parties.

 

To me the scenes in Indiana are the best. It is full of warmth, family love, gentle comedy and falling in love. This part of the film reminds me of my bride's and my first Christmas. Her family had issues so she spent some time at my house. We hadn't dated long but when Christmas came there were presents for her under the tree which caught her completely by surprise. She was so overcome that for 28 years we have spent every Christmas with my family. It is a section that gives you the warm fuzzies. It is wonderful watching Barbara's transformation from hard edged girl to soft hearted soul who can appreciate a loving family.

 

caps.jpg

 

Christmas the way I see at my house. I get to play the piano and others sing along.

 

caps2RTN.jpg

 

Both of them remind me of my grandmother. It's just a lovely shot.

 

This is not a film that is the likes of "Palm Beach Story" or "Miracle At Morgan's Creek." Sturges and Leisen, who also did "Easy Living," (another favorite) score nicely with this wonderful film.

 

Edited by: movieman1957 on Nov 10, 2009 6:07 PM

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I think that one of the key attributes of Remember the Night is precisely Preston Sturges' screenplay, I don't think it would have been anywhere near as good if it had been written by anybody else.

 

My memory is a little rusty about a few details in the movie; I have a recording from TCM but I'm going to hold out most likely until the new DVD from the TCM Vault has been reviewed in the usual websites, and if the image quality is good I'll just go ahead and buy that to watch during the holidays.

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Hi Chris! What a wonderful ramble.

 

>

> Thus begins a "road" picture of a different kind. They find out they are both from Indiana and since Barbara has nowhere else to go Fred invites her along. Barbara finds out not everyone is like her or her New York City citizens. Fred finds out not everyone who has a past is like they seem. Falling in love with someone on opposite sides of the law can be a problem for both parties.

>

 

Now that is a terrific summation of the plot, and I never thought of it before, but it is a kind of a "road" picture, isn't it? I especially was taken by the stopover at Barbara's mother's house. That was unexpected, and that whole sequence in the film, in contrast to the later scenes at Fred's house, is photographed extremely darkly and very noirish. The shock of how Barbara is received by her only family member, her own mother, really hit home. If the earlier part of the movie had me thinking this was going to be a somewhat routine romantic comedy, this section jolted me out of that.

 

> To me the scenes in Indiana are the best. It is full of warmth, family love, gentle comedy and falling in love. This part of the film reminds me of my bride's and my first Christmas. Her family had issues so she spent some time at my house. We hadn't dated long but when Christmas came there were presents for her under the tree which caught her completely by surprise. She was so overcome that for 28 years we have spent every Christmas with my family. It is a section that gives you the warm fuzzies. It is wonderful watching Barbara's transformation from hard edged girl to soft hearted soul who can appreciate a loving family.

>

 

That had me all teary-eyed! What a lovely emotional connection you have to this film. Does your bride like it, too? Have you shown it to your folks?

 

>

> Christmas the way I see at my house. I get to play the piano and others sing along.

>

> caps2RTN.jpg

>

> Both of them remind me of my grandmother. It's just a lovely shot.

>

 

:D I really thought this part of the film was well handled. It never tipped over into anything phony, it was real and really warm. It was the "anitdote" to NYC and Barbara's own experience of the same part of the world, under wildly different circumstances.

 

> This is not a film that is the likes of "Palm Beach Story" or "Miracle At Morgan's Creek." Sturges and Leisen, who also did "Easy Living," (another favorite) score nicely with this wonderful film.

>

 

I actually think of this movie more as a drama, with some comedy in it. The only scenes that aren't too interesting are the courtroom sequences, but once they get together on their way to Fred's house, or even that comical interlude where they are arrested for trespassing, the movie comes alive.

 

As for Barbara and Fred, this is my favorite of all their screen pairings, yes, including Double Indemnity. I have an emotional connection to it, too, but I feel I can relate more to Barbara's experiences with her family than Fred's, so it's interesting we have two different perspectives but both like the movie. :)

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Well, it looks like I won?t be taking part on the discussion of Remember the Night because it turns out I don?t have the movie after all. According to my VHS tape listings it was supposed to be on Tape #156 but alas, it?s not there. Too bad because when I saw it long ago I like it very much.

 

I am not one to wallow in sappy movies but I?m not a cold fish either. Someone once started on thread naming movies that made you cry. I was actually able to come up with a list of sorts. So I?m not hopeless. But I shouldn't use the word sappy because Remember the Night is certainly not that. As has already been mentioned, the idea of warmth is what I remember and yes the sequences at Fred's home. I remember also thinking how dark and strange the visit to Barb's mother was and kind of sad. It set up being able to feel good that she was to have a happy Christmas day after all.

 

This movie reminded me in a way of It Happened One Night where you have the similar situation of a man and a woman on the road and where the man has a certain advantage and the woman is especially vulnerable situation-wise in that in one case you have a woman who is going to jail and in the other on the run from her home and in each case dependent on the guy for a little consideration. Unfortunately I don't remember either movie that well at the moment but there was something inherently romantic about the eventuality that the guy can exercise a little tenderness towards the female and in doing so reveal a kind regard for her and then to slowly see them coming together as the story unfolds.

 

*Miss Goddess*, I too thought the courtroom scene a little odd, especially this sequence when one of the lawyers went on and on. As I recall (and believe me the memory is dim) it was a sort of set piece and was supposed to be funny, I guess. Every once in a while Fred would look at Barbara and vice versa and roll their eyes. That's what I was doing. I didn't think it at all funny and it totally destroyed the pacing and continuity. But thankfully it ended. As happens sometimes, you watch something like that again much later and has a totally different effect, maybe that will happen with me when I can see this again. But at the time I thought it slow and dreary.

 

Anyway I'll enjoy reading what goes on here and unless my memory is sufficiently jarred to recall something useful I will confine myself to lurking and enjoying. I do think this is a fine movie (and I should mention a good fan of both of the principals)

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I was going to mention Barbara's visit home but I thought I had gone on long enough. I think it serves two purposes. The first to show that Barbara wasn't kidding when she talked about her family. More importantly, secondly, to contrast it with Fred's family. In that contrast her transformation begins. I think she transforms to what she already is but never had a chance to really let it come out.

 

The opening court room scene I find funnier than Lafitte just on the performance of the defense attorney. Over the top? Certainly. I think it is all about a lawyer going to whatever degree he can for his client. In this case no matter how ridiculous.

 

I like their scene at Niagara Falls. Trying to convince each other what they can do about it. With Barbara having been so lovingly warned by Beulah about Fred and not ruining his career. (I thought she took it as graciously as it was given.) But you get the sense that will all work out.

 

Wendy:

 

Thanks. We talk about that every time we watch the film and how much that first Christmas meant to my bride.

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> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> I think she transforms to what she already is but never had a chance to really let it come out.

>

 

That's a generous way of looking at it, and I quite agree.

 

>

> I like their scene at Niagara Falls. Trying to convince each other what they can do about it. With Barbara having been so lovingly warned by Beulah about Fred and not ruining his career. (I thought she took it as graciously as it was given.) But you get the sense that will all work out.

>

 

About the way Beulah warned her against getting involved with Fred, I was surprised how delicately that came off. It would be tricky not seem snobbish or pushy but the actresses and the director handled that in such a way you understood the wisdom behind her cautions.

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Nobody does it better than Barbara to go between comedy and drama. How can this be the hateful Phyllis Dietrichson or the crazy Martha Ivers. She?s sassy and sweet. With her mother, she?s so hurt.

 

?I?ve forgotten how much that woman hates me. And how much I hate her.?

 

Reliving the trauma of her childhood, so sad...like a little girl; like she doesn?t deserve any better. If Stanwyck can give you a look that kills, Stanwyck can ALSO give you a quivering chin that can break your heart. She looks around at home and hearth and takes it all in. She melts. She?s not as hard-boiled as she has been in her career, so the difference between her city self and country self is not a Grand Canyon. But there?s just enough.

 

Beulah Bondi and Elizabeth Patterson playing Mother & Aunt were a sweet pair. How much is it with Beulah losing her son to Stanwyck or losing him period. It was a lovely scene between Beulah and Stanwyck. Quiet, delicate. It?s the power of the love she sees all around him that makes her give him up. Or try to.

 

Sterling Holloway had a good voice.

 

I chuckled at the Canadian border scene. How back then you could just say you?re an American and be waved on through.

 

There scene up at Niagara Falls was romantic, in the shadows, soft talking. I believe Fred MacMurray. He always seemed kind of dopey to me. But he?s quite the romantic lead and with a tough cookie like Missy.

 

I love the double meaning of purpose in the second trial scene. How he loves her and is rough and mean to make the jury hate him, and acquit her. How he sounds kind of tearful when he pleads with the judge. WoW! Fred.

?You?re good enough for me.? He?s killin? me. I?m falling for him myself.

 

She?ll take the sentence, be good and clean and square with him. What a great bittersweet ending.

 

I often vacillate between my fondness for Bette Davis and Barbara Stanwyck. They compete in my mind for top shelf space in my cinemabiliastic mind. It's still Bette for her fireworks. But Stanwyck...oh Stanwyck!! She's always knocking at the door.

 

Preston Sturges is king. He doesn't go all treacly. Keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground. Bette had Wyler...but Stanwyck having Leisen and Sturges and Wilder and Capra ain't bad either.

 

Good suggestion Movieman. And sweet story about your wife's Christmas with your family.

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In between and betwixt "rambles" here ,I just want to get in a word for a terrific

film I just saw this morning.

 

BITTER VICTORY (1957) directed by Nicholas Ray

 

I was ENORMOUSLY impressed yet again, by Nicholas Ray's way of X-RAY-ING the human soul, if

you'll pardon the awful pun. This time he pins his beaming peepers on two soldiers. Two men made

of entirely different material, both conditioned in different ways by their war experiences. These men

are played by *Curd Jurgens* and *Richard Burton* in what I consider among the VERY BEST work

ever done by either. They both completely get under the skin of their characters, and never were two

men less alike---yet both are not who they really are, either, because war is making them into

something less than human.

 

On the surface, one man is basically honest---with himself and others, and the other is dishonest.

Both are chosen to take on a mission in WWII North Africa that will test their mettle and win them a

medal, if successful. One is an officer, a gentleman---and a desk jockey. The other is an officer, not

much of a gentleman, and a combat hardened soldier. The desk jockey is married to Ruth Roman,

and yes, you can just guess the other guy knows about her, too.

 

I'm being cryptic about the details because I want so much for others to see it with their own eyes,

and maybe be good enough to discuss it. I was very impressed with this character study, what

different types of men will do under extreme circumstances, how in the end, you pay for what you

are. There is even redemption. I'll leave it to you to see for yourselves which character redeems

himself.

 

A word for the character (one of the privates that goes along on the mission with Jurgens and

Burton) who is always smart mouthing and sassing the Major...I have to watch the movie again to

find out which actor* played him, but I loved him. He had what I'd call the "Timothy Carey role". :D

 

*It was Nigel Green. This TCM article mentions him specifically:

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=4433&category=Articles

 

Richard Burton and Curt Jurgens face the enemy within while serving on a dangerous mission.

Bitter-Victory-4.jpg

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Nov 13, 2009 5:03 PM

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Nov 13, 2009 5:18 PM

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Two men made of entirely different material, both conditioned in different ways by their war experiences.

 

Hi there, April.... after reading your post and looking at the article you posted too, I went on a little search... ha.. to my USUAL source... YOUTUBE... and only found the OPENING to this film (the first seven minutes)

 

VERY intriguing.

 

I am not much of a "Burton" fan... (and no.. this is NOT one of those You've never TRIED a tomato/Bogart have you? moments... HA!) I just have not really liked him in too much that I have seen him in... but he DOES have a way about him... and I imagine (just judging from the first few moments) this is a film he could do very well in.

 

I liked the set up showing the differences between the two men... their strengths and weaknesses... and how BOTH their "skills" were really needed (in one man) to do the job right.. so if I am guessing... based on all the info I have so far.. they have to work together and combine their strengths in order to pull off their assingment.. and of course given their different personalities (and the hint you have given about Ruth) they WON'T have an easy time of THAT will they???

 

I will keep an eye out for this one.. it sounds like it could be a nice battle of wits... and I LIKE the way (from what I have seen so far) that Ray seems to, as you say" "xray" the soul in his stories.

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