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MissGoddess
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Simone's petite blanchisseuse in Mademoiselle Fifi (1944) is one of my favorite female characters. Perhaps because it is always interesting and very emotional to see someone innocent gradually confronted with the sorrier side of human nature. You are on the edge of your

seat as to whether this experience will change her character, will it make her cynical or

will she just give up and become like the rest of them? These for me are the central

questions that make Robert Wise's little movie so interesting---that and the always

interesting effects of people of disparate backgrounds being thrown together in close

quarters and undergoing difficult circumstances.

 

That was nicely said. It's about time you wrote something of importance on this board. If I've said it once I've said it a thousand times... :P

 

I really enjoy the entrapment of strangers because it forces those to be with others of different stripes. Granted, this sometimes produces caricatures and heavy-handedness, but when done well, it can be very engrossing and quite enligtening. The experience should be self-reflective. There are so many aspects to human nature that be explored in such settings with the primary one being the need of each other.

 

Mademoiselle Fifi deals mostly with the bourgeois and their loyalty to self, money, and status as opposed to nation and, much bigger picture, humankind. Simone Simon's "petite blanchisseuse" has "nothing" compared to those she is entrapped with in a coach ride. All that she really possesses of great value is herself, her self-worth. If she's to lose that, she's worthless. What truly is most valuable, what we possess or what we possess?

 

12 Angry Men is one of my favorite "entrapment" films. So many male personalities are represented in the film and I can relate to it fully. The greatest thing I take from the film has to do with strength and courage. I believe too many people think it is cowardly to be quiet and brave to be heard. This is not always the case to me. Just because one speaks loudly and with force does not make them strong and brave. Those who tend to do this rarely listen to the words of others. And those who do not listen are cowards. They are afraid to hear the words of others.

 

I believe you can learn a lot about the character of a man quite simply. A man who will tell a man of difference, "you are right," is strong and courageous to me. A man who will tell a man of difference, "I am wrong," is all the more strong and courageous to me. If you cannot admit when others are right and when you are wrong, you are admitting far more than you could ever say.

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Simone Simon's "petite blanchisseuse" has "nothing" compared to those she is entrapped with in a coach ride. All that she really possesses of great value is herself, her self-worth. If she's to lose that, she's worthless. What truly is most valuable, what we possess or what we possess?

 

It's also interesting that she thinks for a while that no one shares her values anymore, so that

when John Emery comes back to her to make up for his earlier cowardice, she won't believe him.

He later tells her how much and even the Abbe, the whole town, "needed her" to believe and

not give up. That made me a little mad. They shouldn't have to lean on her, the wimps.

 

 

12 Angry Men is one of my favorite "entrapment" films. So many male personalities are represented in the film and I can relate to it fully.

 

Another good example of that type of scenario. But doesn't the "hero", Henry Fonda, do an

awful lot of talking himself? He's not the quietest one in the room by far but he's the one

who's right isn't he?

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I just realized that Friday, the holiday, is going to be devoted to Hitchcock films, yay! Finally,

on a day I'll be home they will be showing movies I like. :P

 

People should catch the Dick Cavett interview if they can. Hitch is so dry, so dead pan

that I think sometimes Dick wasn't sure if his leg was being pulled or not, ha!

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It's also interesting that she thinks for a while that no one shares her values anymore, so that

when John Emery comes back to her to make up for his earlier cowardice, she won't believe him.

He later tells her how much and even the Abbe, the whole town, "needed her" to believe and

not give up. That made me a little mad. They shouldn't have to lean on her, the wimps.

 

I believe Emery was actually attempting to help her find herself again. If he just left it at, "do it for me," she wouldn't feel the need. When he says, "do it for YOUR town," she's going to feel important and needed. This is the nationalistic sentiment of the film that is being expressed and, you could definitely say, preached.

 

You know, it would be like me saying to you, "do it for me," and you replying, "Ha!" So I won't tell you to do that, I'll tell you to do it for Butterscotchy.

 

12 Angry Men is one of my favorite "entrapment" films. So many male personalities are represented in the film and I can relate to it fully.

 

Another good example of that type of scenario. But doesn't the "hero", Henry Fonda, do an

awful lot of talking himself? He's not the quietest one in the room by far but he's the one

who's right isn't he?

 

Fonda is not the loudest in the room. He stands up against the room in a quiet way. He even goes as far as to risk his own beliefs through quiet means. How so? He calls for a secret ballot. It turns out that he is being heard after all. The reaction of some in the room is of loud accusatory disgust. Those who are loud tend to hear just one voice.

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I believe Emery was actually attempting to help her find herself again. If he just left it at, "do it for me," she wouldn't feel the need. When he says, "do it for YOUR town," she's going to feel important and needed. This is the nationalistic sentiment of the film that is being expressed and, you could definitely say, preached.

 

Yes, that's true, and the nationalistic angle is the only part I don't respond to.

 

You know, it would be like me saying to you, "do it for me," and you replying, "Ha!" So I won't tell you to do that, I'll tell you to do it for Butterscotchy.

 

Right on both counts.

 

Fonda is not the loudest in the room. He stands up against the room in a quiet way. He even goes as far as to risk his own beliefs through quiet means. How so? He calls for a secret ballot. It turns out that he is being heard after all. The reaction of some in the room is of loud accusatory disgust. Those who are loud tend to hear just one voice.

 

I agree with all that certainly, but I don't find him all that "quiet", just in comparison to the loud

mouths on the jury. He did speak up and it's important that he did so with assurance as opposed

to yelling and intimidation. However, he didn't sit back and keep quiet or just vote whatever way

would get him out of there and back home the quickest.

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I agree with all that certainly, but I don't find him all that "quiet", just in comparison to the loud

mouths on the jury. He did speak up and it's important that he did so with assurance as opposed

to yelling and intimidation. However, he didn't sit back and keep quiet or just vote whatever way

would get him out of there and back home the quickest.

 

What I'm attempting to say is that it's not only how one speaks out but also how one listens (quiet). Quite often, it is the quiet ones that you need to reach the most. The loud ones tend to be unreachable.

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What I'm attempting to say is that it's not only how one speaks out but also how one listens (quiet). Quite often, it is the quiet ones that you need to reach the most. The loud ones tend to be unreachable.

 

I hate to agree with you but that's so true! That's why it's such a pity that the wheels that squeal the loudest get the most grease. :)

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That's why it's such a pity that the wheels that squeal the loudest get the most grease.

 

Yes, but they are rarely at peace.

 

Don't get me wrong, I do believe in speaking up and speaking with conviction, but only when it is necessary. The longer and louder you speak the more silent you become.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> That's why it's such a pity that the wheels that squeal the loudest get the most grease.

>

> Yes, but they are rarely at peace.

>

> Don't get me wrong, I do believe in speaking up and speaking with conviction, but only when it is necessary. The longer and louder you speak the more silent you become.

 

I beleive that, too, though in practical terms, speaking up and speaking loudly gets you more of things you want in life. In the movies, too, we tend to like the big mouths and chatterboxes, you even said His Girl Friday was your favorite comedy. :)

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*quiet and reserved or loud and chatty?*

 

holy joe! maybe a combo. heehee!

 

i seem to lean more towards characters with an outgoing personality, who love to talk with people, but arent too boistrous in the process of doing so, like *Mrs. Bennett*. heehee! i guess it depends upon which movie we are talking about. i love characters everywhere from *Holly Golightly*, to *Smithy*. heehee!

 

shall i make a list? ;)

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Favorite "quiet/reserved" characters - WOMEN*:

 

1. Joan Fontaine as "Jane Eyre"

2. Joan Fontaine as "Mrs DeWinter" in Rebecca

3. Simone Simon as "Irena" in Cat People

4. 'Tippi' Hedren as Marnie

5. Bette Davis as Mlle DesPortes in All This, And Heaven, Too

6. Bette Davis as "Camille" in Now, Voyager

7. Gail Russell as "Penelope" in Angel and the Bad Man

8. Gail Russell as "Stella" in The Uninvited

9. Grace Kelly as the Princess in The Swan

10. Beatrice Pearson as "Doris" in Force of Evil

 

Favorite "chatty/outgoing" characters - WOMEN:

 

1. Vivien Leigh as "Scarlett" in GWTW

2. Audrey Hepburn as "Reggie" in Charade

3. Ava Gardner as "Honey Bear" in Mogambo

4. Gene Tierney as "Isabel" in The Razor's Edge

5. Bette Davis as "Margo" in All About Eve

6. Bette Davis as "Judith" in Dark Victory

7. Rosalind Russell as Auntie Mame

8. Susan Hayward as "Jane Hoyt" in Soldier of Fortune

9. Vivien Leigh as "Emma" in That Hamilton Woman

10. Gwyneth Paltrow as Emma (Wodehouse)

 

*I'll post the boys later.

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i like mrs. bennett just not as much as lizzy. ;)

 

okay lets go!

 

*quiet:*

beth march~(margaret o'brien) little women

mr. darcy~(laurence olivier) pride and prejudice

 

 

*chatty:*

holly golightly~(audrey hepburn) breakfast at tiffany's

 

im so out of it today with my cold, could you make your list first, and then ill finish mine. i cant think of anything, everyone is rushing to my head at once. heehee!

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speaking up and speaking loudly gets you more of things you want in life.

 

This is true.

 

In the movies, too, we tend to like the big mouths and chatterboxes, you even said His Girl Friday was your favorite comedy.

 

Oh, I enjoy all kinds of characters in film just as I enjoy all kinds of people in life. Enjoying and respecting are two different entities, though.

 

I'm a big mouth chatterbox. I can talk and fool around for hours.

 

I love the lively, fast-paced banter of His Girl Friday. It's electrifying.

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Oh, I enjoy all kinds of characters in film just as I enjoy all kinds of people in life. Enjoying and respecting are two different entities, though.

 

That's true and I never thought about whether I "respected" those characters I listed or not. Hmmm...I probably don't much respect any of them except Mrs Morgan, ha!

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okay, ill try again....

 

Quiet/reserved:

 

ida lupino as Libby Saul in *deep valley*

greer garson as elizabeth bennett in *pride and prejudice*

margaret o'brien as beth in *little women*

junie allyson as patsy deyo in *two girls and a sailor*

loretta young as rachel harvey in *rachel and the stranger*

loretta young as katrin holstrom in *the farmer's daughter*

dana wynter as erika angermann in *fraulein*

 

chatty/outgoing:

 

greer garson as paula ridgeway in *random harvest*

greer garson as Julia Packett in *julia misbehaves*

penny singleton as Belinda "bill" in *go west, young lady*

audrey hepburn as Holly Golightly in *breakfast at tiffany's*

marsha hunt as connie scott in *valley of decision*

julie andrews as fraulein maria in *the sound of music*

eleanor parker as mary stewart chern in *many rivers to cross*

julie andrews as millie dilmount in *thoroughly modern millie*

judy garland as lily mars in *presenting lily mars*

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I like those characters, too, the ones I've seen I mean. Excellent choices! I forgot about

the ones Loretta played...I would also add her deaf girl in that movie with Alan Ladd we

talked about.

 

I posted my list earlier if you go back a few. I also want to add the male characters.

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Well, lookie there. You actually have MORE 50s movies on DVD than any other decade. Now that does surprise me. I surely thought the 40s would top the chart. I'm also surprised to see you own that many 60s movies.

 

Emma is your 90s DVD, but I have no idea what that 2000 DVD would be. It can't be something romantic, can it? I've got it! It's No Country for Old Men. How could I have forgotten how much you love that movie? Silly me.

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Once I factor in all my recorded dvds, those numbers will probably change alot. So far most of the movies I've been transferring from VHS are from the 1930s.

 

I have no idea what that 2000 DVD would be. It can't be something romantic, can it? I've got it! It's No Country for Old Men.

 

Well...in a manner of speaking I guess you could say it is a movie about no country for old men...it's Gladiator. :)

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