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Movie Rambles


MissGoddess
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Excuse me, I was distracted by some beefcake that's currently on TCM...

 

What I wanted to add is that clearly, Gladiator is an HISTORICAL movie and

very educational to watch, in spite of the fact that Joaquin Phoenix's character is

complete fiction. :)

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[/u]The Furies[/u] - 1950

 

I relished watching this movie last night. There are some movies I "enjoy" watching or

have fun watching but this was something else again. I've never seen another Anthony Mann

movie like it, it's as if he was on full throttle when he directed it. It moves so quickly, the scenes

are rather short and move from event to event, building and building to a showdown. (I won't give away the somewhat unexpected ending) As quickly as she goes, The Furies

covers a lot of territory both figuratively and literally.

 

T.C. Jeffords, played with hoary gusto by Walter Huston, is the monarch of all he surveys on

his vast ranch he calls "The Furies", and Barbara Stanwyck, playing Vance Jeffords, is

every inch her father's daughter. I don't know my Greek tragedy very well, but even I can

appreciate how vividly the director has placed classical conflict in a setting that seems

remarkably comfortable with it, the Old West. Add Waxman's driven, Spanish influenced score,

the dramatic imagery by DP Victor Milner (with special effects assistance by Farciot Edouart and

Gordon Jennings, two names more familiar to me than Milner's) and you have a real "horse

OPERA." The plot never gets buried in the dramatics or lost in the stylishness and it's very

unpredictable except that you just know the two main protagonists, if you can call them that, are

bound to clash cataclysmically.

 

The Furies begs for multiple viewings. So much happens so quickly that I felt I had to pay

extra close attention or risk missing something crucial. The script, by Niven Busch (novel)

and Charles Schnee is caustic, literate and witty but spare allowing the performances and

visuals to carry the story along like a whirlwind.

 

Providing inestimable character support are: Gilber Roland as Juan, the loyal childhood

friend and unrequited lover of Vance who is also an unwelcome "squatter" on The Furies,

ensconced in a fortified eagle's lair high atop a cliff with his brothers and his mother (played with

witchy menace by Blanche Yurka). Juan is the only one who can bring out Vance's vulnerable

side and make her see where she's wrong. They share a bond forged in childhood, but Juan

knows he's not the one to win her heart; That's for Wendell Corey as "Rip Darrow" to do.

He is the heir of the neighboring ranch and a Jeffords implacable enemy by birthright. He's no

gentle Juan, he challenges Vance as much as her father ever did (lots of talk by Stanwyck about

putting the "bit in her mouth"). Thomas Gomez glowers about as "El Tigre," Jeffords'

henchman who pathalogically cannot resist instigating bloodshed at every possible opportunity. And then along comes Judith Anderson as "Flo", the calculating but pragmatic interloper at the ranch. She is TC's new "bride" from the Capitol and Vance's rival for control of The Furies (i.e., control of TC). Being a woman, Vance will temporarily be at a loss as to how to deal with

Flo---men she understands but women are a mystery. Flo, though adept at manipulating

Washington power players, did not reckon with her hostess when she attempts to usurp Vance's

place and made plans to take over the former Mrs Jeffords' bedroom. Woman or no woman,

Vance deals with her the only way she knows how. Pretty effectively, too---and I NEVER saw it

coming. :0

 

The only character who never appears but who still seems to wield a certain influence and whose

presence is enshrined in a room that represents the only real "heart" or femininity at the

awesomely rough hewn ranch is the first Mrs TC Jeffords, the lady of the bedroom. Her portrait is

prominent in several scenes and her genteel ways referred to with wistful longing by Jeffords only

son, played with neutered chagrin by John Bromfield (sporting an inexplicable Elvis

pompadour. Where did that come from? It's the hair stylist* on this picture who should have

been strung up). Of course, we know who the real "son" of TC is, it's Vance.

 

There is even a small part for laconic Arthur Hunnicut, playing the only character in

the land without an agenda or a "fury" riding his back. And he even has a couple of choice lines.

 

What with unnatural rivalries and jealousies betwixt father and daughter, power plays between

lovers, betrayal and tests of loyalty between friends, not to mention about a hundred other

shenanigans, there is plenty in The Furies to keep you entertained and keep the more

analytical busy with their pocket Freud's for months. ;)

 

I'm glad the Criterion Collection release includes the novel by Niven Busch because now

I would like to read it for comparison. I haven't explored the "extras" yet either, but will

do so hopefully soon while the movie is fresh. I will also try to post some screencaps,

perhaps tonight.

 

*If I have just one pitiful little criticism, it's Barbara's hairstyle which seems anachronistic but

really is just plain unflattering. It makes her look harsher and older than I'm sure her character

is meant to be.

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Speaking of Barbara Stanwyck, I watched her and Joel McCrea in *Trooper Hook.* Barbara is a woman who was taken prisoner by Indians and has had a child with the chief. During a fight with the Cavalry she is rescued with her son and is to be sent back to her husband.

 

It is pretty much McCrea's picture as he plays the soldier who befriends her and shields her from the inevitable scrutiny put on her as a white woman with an Indian child. McCrea is forceful in dealing with both the whites and Indians to complete his orders on delivering her. Stanwyck is fine but there is not a lot for her to do then hold onto her son and an occasional rant at the way she is being treated.

 

Probably daring for its day in the way it deals with her treatment of her and her history by the white community the topic seems kind of tame now. Good action and nice support from Earl Holliman.

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Hi Chris,

 

I've never heard of Trooper Hook but it sounds like something I might like. I'll

see if I can find it on Netflix. It doesn't sound like the sort of role Barbara ordinarily would

be cast in. Can you tell me what year it's from?

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thank you dahlink!!

 

oh you mean her character in And Now Tomorrow? yes i love her character too. she was so strong and didnt feel sorry for herself when she turned def. she did everything she could without ever losing hope! of course alan didnt help much with his pride of looking down on her at first for being rich. i think what she said was, "it was the first time i ever saw hatred staring at me." when they were both kids.

 

do you wish to make your male character list first or shall i?

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bonjour dahlink!!

 

yes, And Now Tomorow is the one! heehee! i dont blame you, i get so many movies confused with similar names.

 

okay, get some rest and have some chamomille hot tea. great for having a rest! ;)

 

*quiet/reserved*

 

laurence olivier as mr. darcy in Pride and Prejudice

ronald colman as Smithy in random Harvest

walter pidgeon as pierre curie in Madame curie

gary cooper as melody jones in Along Came Jones

gary cooper as doc frail in The Hanging Tree

stewart granger as andre-louis moreau in Scaramouche

robert taylor as bushrod gentry in Many Rivers to Cross

john wayne as sean thornton in The Quiet Man

 

 

*chatty/outgoing*

 

john wayne as michael donovan in Donovan's Reef

cary grant as walter christopher eckland in Father Goose

clark gable as harry in Adventure

cary grant as mortiner brewster in Arsenic and Old Lace

bogie as charlie allnut in the African Queen

errol flynn as captain blood in Captain Blood

fred astaire as jervis pendleton in Daddy Long Legs

frankie sinatra as charlie y. reader in The Tender Trap

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Thank you, dahlink! I am more than ever eager to see Many Rivers to Cross. I want to know what makes "Bushrod" so quiet. ;)

 

Here goes my list of the chaps:

 

Quiet/Reserved:

 

"Doc" Frail - Gary Cooper, The Hanging Tree

Link Jones - Gary Cooper, Man of the West

Joe Chapin - Gary Cooper, Ten North Frederick

Will Kane - Gary Cooper, High Noon

Hooker - Gary Cooper in Garden of Evil

 

OK now that we've got HIM out of the way I can move on (I can't help

it if Coop made a specialty out of this type. ;) )

 

Ethan Edwards - John Wayne, The Searchers

Godfrey Parks - William Powell, My Man Godfrey

Joe Leland - Frank Sinatra, The Detective

Sam Loggins - Frank Sinatra, Kings Go Forth

Shane - Alan Ladd, Shane

John Chandler - Alan Ladd, The Proud Rebel

Charles "Smithy" Ransome - Ronald Colman, Random Harvest

Rio - Robert Taylor, Ride, Vaquero!

Vic Marswell - Clark Gable, *Mogambo*

Abe Lincoln - Henry Fonda, *Young Mr Lincoln*

John Robie - Cary Grant, *To Catch a Thief*

Jeff Baily - Robert Mitchum, Out of the Past

Dan Milner - Robert Mitchum, His Kind of Woman

Rick - Humphrey Bogart, Casablanca

Billy - Humphrey Bogart, Beat the Devil (I love that Bogie could do both)

 

Outgoing/Assertive

 

Rhett Butler - Clark Gable, *GWTW*

Tom Doniphon - John Wayne, *The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance*

Nick Charles - William Powell, The Thin Man

Joe Wilson - Spencer Tracy, *Fury*

"****" - Clark Gable, *Manhattan Melodrama*

"Candy" Johnson - Clark Gable, ***** Tonk*

"Lucky" Wilson - Robert Montgomery, Hide-Out

O'Hara - Gary Cooper, The General Died at Dawn

JT Chance - John Wayne, *Rio Bravo*

James Bond - Sean Connery, Dr. No, From Russia With Love, Thunderball

Mark - Sean Connery, Marnie

Joe - John Garfield, Force of Evil

Rocky Sullivan - James Cagney, Angels with Dirty Faces

Jim Wilson - Robert Ryan, On Dangerous Ground

William Shrike - Robert Ryan, Lonelyhearts

Hank Lee - Clark Gable, Soldier of Fortune

Roy Earle - Humphrey Bogart, High Sierra

Philip Marlowe - Humphrey Bogart, The Big Sleep

Harry Morgan - Humphrey Bogart, To Have and Have Not

Sam Spade - Humphrey Bogart, The Maltese Falcon

Geoff Carter - Cary Grant, Only Angels Have Wings

Jim Lane - Clark Gable, Test Pilot

 

 

Message was edited by: MissGoddess

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I keep adding names to my list. Making a list of characters is the easiest for me, as

opposed to making lists of films or directors because it is character that draws me

to a movie more than anything.

 

Theresa, what one quality do you think all your quiet characters share in common?

 

What quality do your outgoing characters share? And you can break it out by gender

because the qualities may differ from men to women.

 

I think maybe all my quiet women share "gentleness" and/or painful pasts, the outgoing

female characters are comfortable around men more than women.

 

With the chaps, the quiet ones all seem relatively uncomplicated, undemanding. Few

of them are actually what I'd call "shy" except "Smithy" in Random Harvest. I'm not

usually drawn to shy men characters. Quiet is okay, but not hesitant.

 

The outgoing ones are all competent and effectual at dealing with situations as they

arise. I guess you'd say they are decisive.

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Okay, here are my lists of favorite quiet and loud characters. My quiet characters are those who are either shy, calm, and/or speak only when compelled. They don't waste energy. My loud characters are those who are chatty, outgoing, and full of energy, some of it wonderfully wasteful.

 

"Quiet" Male Characters

 

1. Juror #8 (Henry Fonda in 12 Angry Men)

2. Harmonica (Charles Bronson in Once Upon a Time in the West)

3. The Man With No Name (sort of): Joe, Blonco, Mondie (Clint Eastwood in Leone's trilogy)

4. Will Kane (Gary Cooper in High Noon)

5. Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews in Laura)

6. Henry Drummond (Spencer Tracy in Inherit the Wind)

7. Bennett Marco (Frank Sinatra in The Manchurian Candidate)

8. Philip Raven (Alan Ladd in This Gun for Hire)

9. Dave Hirsh (Frank Sinatra in Some Came Running)

10. Gwynplaine (Conrad Veidt in The Man Who Laughs)

11. Harry Dawes (Humphrey Bogart in The Barefoot Contessa)

12. Link Jones (Gary Cooper in Man of the West)

13. Jim Wilson (Robert Ryan in On Dangerous Ground)

14. Griff Bonnell (Barry Sullivan in Forty Guns)

15. Howard Kemp (James Stewart in The Naked Spur)

 

"Loud" Male Characters

 

1. Geoff Carter (Cary Grant in Only Angels Have Wings)

2. Earl Pfeiffer (Robert Ryan in Clash by Night)

3. Harry Powell (Robert Mitchum in The Night of the Hunter)

4. Johnny Prince (Dan Duryea in Scarlet Street)

5. Walter Burns (Cary Grant in His Girl Friday)

6. Johnny Case (Cary Grant in Holiday)

7. O'Hara (Gary Cooper in The General Died at Dawn)

8. Johnnie Aysgarth (Cary Grant in Suspicion)

9 E.K. Hornbeck (Gene Kelly in Inherit the Wind)

10. Mr. Scratch (Walter Huston in The Devil and Daniel Webster)

11. Captain Gregg (Rex Harrison in The Ghost and Mrs. Muir)

12. Charlie Madison (James Garner in The Americanization of Emily)

13. Bama Dillert (Dean Martin in Some Came Running)

14. Robert Rusk (Barry Foster in Frenzy)

15. Jimmy MacDonald (Dick Powell in Christmas in July)

 

"Quiet" Female Characters

 

1. Irena Reed (Simone Simon in Cat People)

2. "Geechie" Mobley (Cathy O'Donnell in They Live by Night)

3. Jill McBain (Claudia Cardinale in Once Upon a Time in the West)

4. Gillian Holroyd (Kim Novak in Bell, Book, and Candle)

5. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman in Spellbound)

6. Amy Reed (Ann Carter in The Curse of the Cat People)

7. Miss Giddens (Deborah Kerr in The Innocents)

8. Dallas (Claire Trevor in Stagecoach)

9. Sibyl Railton-Bell (Deborah Kerr in Separate Tables)

10. Lina Aysgarth (Joan Fontaine in Suspicion)

11. Gwen French (Martha Hyer in Some Came Running)

12. Dea (Mary Philbin in The Man Who Laughs)

13. Christina Delassalle (V?ra Clouzot in Les Diaboliques)

14. "Nell" Lance (Julie Harris in The Haunting)

15. Belinda McDonald (Jane Wyman in Johnny Belinda)

 

"Loud" Female Characters

 

1. Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind)

2. Ann Krausheimer Smith (Carole Lombard in Mr. and Mrs. Smith)

3. Laurie Jorgensen (Vera Miles in The Searchers)

4. Maxine Faulk (Ava Gardner in The Night of the Iguana)

5. "Honey Bear" Kelly (Ava Gardner in Mogambo)

6. "Kitty" March (Joan Bennett in Scarlet Street)

7. Ginnie Moorehead (Shirley MacLaine in Some Came Running)

8. Bonnie Lee (Jean Arthur in Only Angels Have Wings)

9. "Hildy" Johnson (Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday)

10. Debby Marsh (Gloria Grahame in The Big Heat)

11. Gina (Lilli Palmer in Cloak and Dagger)

12. "Sugarpuss" O'Shea (Barbara Stanwyck in Ball of Fire)

13. Stella (Thelma Ritter in Rear Window)

14. Jessie Stevens (Jessie Royce Landis in To Catch a Thief)

15. Angelica Bullock (Alice Brady in My Man Godfrey)

 

What I have learned while compiling these lists is that I definitely identify with the "quiet" man far more than the "loud" one. I tend to only like "loud" guys when they are humorous. I actually like both "quiet" and "loud" female characters, but I prefer "loud" ones. I'm guessing this is because I like girls who are different than me.

 

I also love characters who can combine "quiet" with "loud." Characters such as Cabman Grey (Boris Karloff in The Body Snatcher), Mrs. Iselin (Angela Lansbury in The Manchurian Candidate), Bruno Anthony (Robert Walker in Strangers on a Train), and Julian Karswell (Niall MacGinnis in Night of the Demon).

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Excellent lists! And some names I wouldn't have expected...Ben from The Manchurian Candidate (in fact, two Frankie characters!) and Harry Dawes (Bogie). And Angie-Kim-Theresa: did you notice who he listed as #4 in the Quiet Men?

 

So I guess you agree Miss Lambchops got what she deserved after all. :P

 

And now I know you actually did watch Bell, Book and Candle and Separate Tables.

 

Interesting that you have two Deborah Kerr characters in your "Quiet Women" list, she excelled at those. I'm surprised you didn't put her character from Night of the Iguana.

 

I guess I prefer the louder ones over all, but best of all are those that combine both.

 

Some of my favorite characters combine both qualities, too. Like Coop's "Clint Maroon" in Saratoga Trunk or really most of his characters. He's quiet compared to Ingrid's "Cleo" but he's not shy or reserved at all. I should add Cleo to my loud ladies list, in fact I've thought of even more:

 

Talkative/Assertive:

Ingrid Bergman in Saratoga Trunk

Clark Gable in The Misfits

Clark Gable in Mutiny on the Bounty

Tyrone Power in The Black Swan

Tyrone Power in The Mark of Zorro

Thelma Ritter in All About Eve

Clifton Webb in [/b]Laura[/b] and The Razor's Edge

Marlon Brando in Sayonara

Hattie MacDaniel in Gone with the Wind

Thomas Mitchell in Stagecoach, Only Angels Have Wings

Rex Harrison in The Ghost and Mrs Muir, My Fair Lady, Cleopatra

Errol Flynn in everything EXCEPT That Forsythe Woman....that belongs in the list below.

 

 

 

Quiet/Reserved:

Olivia de Havilland in Gone with the Wind

Herbert Marshall in The Enchanted Cottage, The Razor's Edge, The Letter, Angel, Trouble in Paradise, Foreign Correspondent

James Mason in The Seventh Veil, Pandora and the Flying Dutchman, North by NorthWest

Marlon Brando in One Eyed Jacks

Dana Andrews in Laura How could I have forgotten him!

Errol Flynn in That Forsythe Woman

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I don't quite know where a character like Jennifer Jones' Madame Bovary fits in

these lists. She's not exactly aggressive, though she's a yearner and a dreamer; but she's not

really quiet either even though she's held back by her circumstances and other people's

expectations.

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Excellent lists!

 

Grazie. I wish I could say the same for yours. :P

 

And some names I wouldn't have expected...Ben from The Manchurian Candidate (in fact, two Frankie characters!) and Harry Dawes (Bogie).

 

I think Sinatra plays tormented men very well. I just love his brand of helplessness and frustration. It's dead on. Like I said, I sense a lot of Bogie with Sinatra. That is, in the films I have seen of his.

 

I really like Dawes. I see a lot of me with him.

 

And Angie-Kim-Theresa: did you notice who he listed as #4 in the Quiet Men?

 

Oops! I meant to say, "Harv." He's quiet, right?

 

So I guess you agree Miss Lambchops got what she deserved after all.

 

Did she deserve something? Hmmmmmmmm...

 

And now I know you actually did watch Bell, Book and Candle and Separate Tables.

 

I loved the trailers! They are so quiet.

 

Interesting that you have two Deborah Kerr characters in your "Quiet Women" list, she excelled at those. I'm surprised you didn't put her character from Night of the Iguana.

 

I was going to include "Hannah." I do like her a lot. I have a thing for the repressed girls. Deb Kerr played them so well.

 

I guess I prefer the louder ones over all, but best of all are those that combine both.

 

That's what I found interesting about making these lists. Many characters are right down the middle. I love "Francie Stevens," but she's a mix of both. She's playfully chatty but with a relaxed demeanor. It's a lovely mix.

 

Some of my favorite characters combine both qualities, too. Like Coop's "Clint Maroon" in Saratoga Trunk or really most of his characters. He's quiet compared to Ingrid's "Cleo" but he's not shy or reserved at all.

 

Of the Coop characters I have seen, most have been on the "quiet" side for me. I'm not categorizing "assertive" as being "loud." My "louds" are characters that you verbally hear. It has nothing to do with non-verbal. Quiet-types can be very assertive with their actions and many loud-types the opposite. In 12 Angry Men, Juror #8 (Henry Fonda) is rarely the guy who starts a conversation. Most everyone talks to him first. He only feels the need to speak up when necessary or when engaged. There are others on the jury who you verbally hear a lot. They are "loud" to me. The quiet man may end up talking the "loudest" when all is said and done, but they rarely start loud.

 

Two of my favorite film characters are "Tom Brown" (Gary Cooper) and "Amy Jolly" (Marlene Dietrich) in Morocco. I really couldn't place either of them on the list because they seem like a mix to me. Tom can be very chatty, aggressive, and open and Amy surely ain't a quiet gal, but they are not "loud." Grace Kelly's "Lisa Carol Fremont" in Rear Window likes to talk but she's not really "loud."

 

I don't quite know where a character like Jennifer Jones' Madame Bovary fits in

these lists. She's not exactly aggressive, though she's a yearner and a dreamer; but she's not

really quiet either even though she's held back by her circumstances and other people's

expectations.

 

Ohhh, Madame Bovary. That's a film I've seen many times over. :P It sounds fascinating, Madame Bovary.

 

And Vivien's "Blanche DuBois" from A Streetcar named Desire, where does she fit in?

 

Ohhh, I don't know.

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Don't knock it 'till you've tried it. I think you would appreciate Madame Bovary, it's a character study and I think you'd be interested in her character. It's also a comment on the hypocritical values in society that promotes certain romantic ideals, yet condemns a girl who believes in and wants to go after those ideals. It's a very tragic story.

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Since you own A Streetcar Named Desire and I don't you should have watched it. It's one of the best performances by an actress but I find it too depressing.

 

Tom and Amy in *Morocco* are good examples of combinaton characters. Marlene's character in Shanghai Express is a little of both, and Clive Brook is definitely "quiet". Marlene's character in Destry Rides Again, on the other hand, is brash.

 

You named James Stewart in The Naked Spur as quiet. I don't think I would have put him there, he seems like a little of both. His Elwood P. Dowd, on the other hand, is very soft spoken yet friendly.

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Since you own A Streetcar Named Desire and I don't you should have watched it. It's one of the best performances by an actress but I find it too depressing.

 

Who watches movies? I've never heard of such a thing. :P

 

Tom and Amy in Morocco are good examples of combinaton characters. Marlene's character in Shanghai Express is a little of both, and Clive Brook is definitely "quiet". Marlene's character in Destry Rides Again, on the other hand, is brash.

 

I haven't watched those other two movies. :D

 

You named James Stewart in The Naked Spur as quiet. I don't think I would have put him there, he seems like a little of both.

 

He may be. I just thought he was so obsessed with his mission that he pent everything up inside of him, thus filling him with quiet rage.

 

His Elwood P. Dowd, on the other hand, is very soft spoken yet friendly.

 

Elwood is so very chatty. He talks to EVERYONE, and he's usually the one who initiates the conversation. This makes him "loud" to me. But how can one call him "loud" when he speaks so softly and quietly? That's why I couldn't put him in either category. Most are "louder" than he because they speak at him more so than to him. I think of this as a "loud" characteristic. I think of "loud-types" as those who like to hear themselves talk. It's about them more often than not.

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I have not seen this movie Goddess...it looks spectacular. How did you obtain a copy? This photo is charming...she is so coy. Just like Gene, this lady cannot take a bad photo and managed to maintain her good looks into her later films like Streetcar Named Desire and the Romance of Mrs. Stone despite all her hardships.

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You and your movie watching foolishness. You've seen more than you admit to and then you admit to seeing more than you claimed. Such nonsense. :P

 

Elwood is so very chatty. He talks to EVERYONE, and he's usually the one who initiates the conversation. This makes him "loud" to me. But how can one call him "loud" when he speaks so softly and quietly? That's why I couldn't put him in either category. Most are "louder" than he because they speak at him more so than to him. I think of this as a "loud" characteristic. I think of "loud-types" as those who like to hear themselves talk. It's about them more often than not.

 

Exactly, it's hard to define certain characters like Elwood!

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> {quote:title=AnnieLaurie wrote:}{quote}

> I have not seen this movie Goddess...it looks spectacular. How did you obtain a copy? This photo is charming...she is so coy. Just like Gene, this lady cannot take a bad photo and managed to maintain her good looks into her later films like Streetcar Named Desire and the Romance of Mrs. Stone despite all her hardships.

 

Hi AnnieLaurie!

 

You are referring to DARK JOURNEY, non? That is actually only available on Region Two dvd, alas. I have a dvd player dedicated to R2 so I bought it since it's also the best print. If you don't have an R2 dvd player, then you might find an Out of Print VHS copy or Region 1 dvd, but they are scarce and the quality of the print is pretty poor.

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