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Movie Rambles


MissGoddess
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Bean counters and executives is right! I mentioned before that I saw "Wanted" last week. I believe this movie really shows what everyone has been talking about on this thread. Now I enjoyed it a bit, don't get me wrong. There were definitely moments of fun, but I couldn't help feeling that I was being pandered to. It was as if the film execs had taken a poll- "he should be a regular guy, yeah, and everyone takes advantage of him" "that's how regular people feel". The character is empowered when he gets a gun and learns to kill. Now, there are consequences to his actions in this movie, but basically, it's about how good you'll feel watching this guy blow away his rivals and perceived enemies. The point is, wouldn't everybody like to become the kind of person who can kick some butt? There is no grey here, except at the end when they give a twist or two for morality's sake. But the rel point is, there is no thought here. Except how can we screw another buck out of the audience.....

 

Now I don't think that Billy Wilder made Sunset Boulevard by polling the audience to see if they felt put upon by their bosses, or that he wanted to see how much money it would make.....

 

Producers don't rely on talent anymore to draw in audiences.

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Right you are Jack, the fine book I read about the making and cast of the film Close Up on Sunset Blvd said Wilder wanted to push the envelope even further. He had wanted to begin the movie with a close up of Holden toe tagged in the morgue, but decided to go with the monkey funeral instead. I think Swanson should have won Oscar for best actress. There were three stars competing for the prize that year, but her performance was the stand out. It took guts, hit so close to home, big comeback. Fortunately, Gloria was happier person in real life than poor Norma.

 

PS>Did you follow comments recently about your namesake? Goddess and I were chatting about how he is our very favorite cad, George Sanders, of course. I still can't get over his sad end, plus being married to two Gabor sisters! Yikes! Someone should make a movie about his life. But the problem is: who could play him? Can't think of any stars even close to his stature and urbanity.

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Well Frank (may I call you Frank?)

 

I've been getting called much worse of late. :D Yes, you can call me "Frank" or "Scott."

 

I will only add that it appears we have some things in common--we both know what we like about the things we like in movies.

 

Commonality! Now we're talking. I often seek out where I can connect with a person versus focusing on items of disconnect.

 

One apparent misconception I want to clear up is that just because I like characters and story lines that have a more clearly defined sense of the "black and white" doesn't mean I expect all the stories to be happy or the endings to make me smile. I know the real world doesn't work that way and it would be pretty boring to watch only movies that show this in an unreal and artificial way.

 

For me, movies don't have to be reflective of the real world or of my values to be enjoyed. I take great comfort in "it's just a movie." I don't expect what I see on the screen to be representative of me. In fact, I'm very thankful that it is not because that would be one boring picture.

 

I know that some view movies as a form of "dreaming and wishing." What they see on the screen they dream of and wish for for themselves. I'm not in the "dreaming and wishing" faction of movie-watching. I'm one who wants a good story -- the more visual the better. The story can be black-and-white or grey, light or dark. It doesn't matter to me.

 

Do I see myself in some movies? Yes. 12 Angry Men, Inherit the Wind, and Holiday speak to me this way. Do I wish I could have and experience some of things characters in movies do? Certainly. I'd love to be like Geoff Carter (Cary Grant) in Only Angels Have Wings or John Robie (Cary Grant) in To Catch a Thief. But that's not what I'm looking to get out of movies.

 

I'm always up for a good cry--and while I have to confess that the Godfather movies made me angry--I still found myself watching, if only to keep hoping for a redeeming quality in someone somewhere. (plus I really like that trumpet solo in the theme song--just before the mandolins start playing) . So I certainly have room in my movie-going life for a wider range of films than just the happy-ending sort of stories.

 

Even if you told me that you ONLY like happy endings, that would have been wonderful to me. Whatever makes you happy is what counts. I just thought I'd speak up for the tragedies and the world of "grey" because there are some of us out here who do like such stories and films.

 

I just believe that so much gray in movies may be a reflection on a culture that I neither want to discuss nor debate at length on a forum like this and it would be refreshing ( at least to me) to see a change in that cultural mindset ( even if only for a while).

 

I'm someone who looks to the good of humanity versus the bad. I'm not big on "doom and gloom." My biggest complaint with today's American culture is that it is extremely selfish, and I believe this took root in the 80s. Today's America focuses primarily on self. It's "my this" and "my that." Me, me, me. I'm for we.

 

A true, loving, unselfish community features all kinds of folks from all kinds of places with all kinds of beliefs. I surely have my own beliefs and opinions and I will share them with others, as I have done with you here. But my words, opinions, and beliefs are not more valuable than yours. For me to think so would be selfish.

 

And PS--thanks for your kind words about the Sgt York thread.

 

You are very welcome.

 

I am still sad about how that turned out, but I am glad to see some folks at least kept trying. You know-even the opposing point of view was welcome--it was just not something I thought was appropriate for me to continue pressing forward.

 

I thought you were very respectful throughout. You did not have to apologize for anything.

 

The way to approach discourse is to speak your peace in peace. If you do this, you will find that more people will hear you. The more ugly you become, the more deaf your audience becomes.

 

And also--thanks for the comment about me being nimble--I don't think anyone has described me that way since I was a toddler--which was a whole lotta years and about a gazillion pounds ago!

 

:D You're a very good writer with a good sense of humor. You convey your feelings and thoughts with great expertise. This grey guy loves your conviction, black and white lady.

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

>I think much or what you see in the entertainment industry is a direct reflection on their creators, writers, producers, directors, etc.--but sadly also on our own society and culture. Yet another conversation for another forum perhaps, but it weighs heavily on my heart sometimes.

 

It does indeed, Ro, it does indeed. I get scared sometimes when I walk into the breakroom

of my office and see what my coworkers love to watch on the television. I get me tea and

run out as fast as I can but even without looking at the TV all I hear is constant "bleeping"

where someone has been cursing. I bet it won't be long before the bleeping will be all

together eliminated. Even the commercials are offensive! Like you said, this topic could

go on and on. Thank heavens for TCM and classic video releases, they are my escape

hatch into more civilized worlds. ;)

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Hi Bonnie Annie Laurie!

 

Sunset Blvd. is probably the best I've seen on the subject, along with The Bad and

the Beautiful but I also recommend What Price Hollywood? from the early 'thirties,

which is being aired in October. It may be the first of that kind of picture.

 

I just finished reading a biography on Louis B. Mayer, and so many of the things I learned

about him make me more nostalgiac than ever. Whatever people may think of MGM

movies in general, you can't take away from Louis B. that he had a passionate conviction

that movies should be uplifting and beautiful and he wouldn't allow anything released that

didin't reflect that for as long as he had the power to do so. I couldn't help but contrast

that attitude with today's studio "execs" who are barely even old enough to shave.

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There is a German documentary on Billy Wilder that TCM runs occasionally that has the "morgue" open from *Sunset Blvd*.

 

The majority of films today are audience tested before they ever reach their opening weekend. The times have changed so much in the last twenty years with large corporations running the studios and with that comes scrutiny and a drive to improve the bottom line lest those share-holders get nervous about their stocks.

 

That leaves producers and filmmakers too often between a rock and a hard place as the studios demand as little risk taking as possible and the majority of film making is a big risk. No one has the foresight to see what will be a big hit and what will be a bomb. You don't work on a movie saying this is going to be the best film of all time. You may pray it will but the best of films are great collaborations between all parties involved and it strikes a chord with the audience. But no one ever knows truly if fate will smile on them when the film is released.

 

In the old studio days when they owned the theaters they could take more risks. Even in the 1970s they could still take risks.

 

But today as more studios are swallowed into bigger corporations risk has become a bad word and no one wants to lose their job by taking a risk. Everyone it seems wants safe movies that will do well not only here but overseas (where the real money is these days).

 

So, the majority of films we get are not risky nor do they appeal to the majority. But every once in a while we do get lucky and a good film gets through all those hurdles and takes our breath away.

 

The pity is that those are few and far between.

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Bean counters and executives is right! I mentioned before that I saw "Wanted" last week. I believe this movie really shows what everyone has been talking about on this thread. The character is empowered when he gets a gun and learns to kill. Now, there are consequences to his actions in this movie, but basically, it's about how good you'll feel watching this guy blow away his rivals and perceived enemies. The point is, wouldn't everybody like to become the kind of person who can kick some butt? There is no grey here, except at the end when they give a twist or two for morality's sake.

 

 

At least that movie threw in the "twist or two"; I remember how shocked I was when'

I saw the critically acclaimed indie film, The Matador, which was about a paid

assassin who not only doesn't change his ways, he makes friends with this "average

business guy" type who ends up envying him and emulating him! And it never

actually comes to a point where the criminality and beastliness of that line of "work"

is addressed. I thought Hard Contract was bad in that respect, but this movie

takes the cake. Unrepentant Assassin-as-Hero, a new low.

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A true, loving, unselfish community features all kinds of folks from all kinds of places with all kinds of beliefs.

 

:)

 

I realized, over on the French Films Thread, that The Marseilles Trilogy (Marius, Fanny, Cesar) from 1932-1936 fits this line Scott wrote to a T! These films have characters that are not all good OR all bad. One man may do something ethically wrong in his business, but then turn around and give his home to a fatherless baby.... There is a wonderful, non-judgemental tone to the movies that make them a joy to watch. So, I guess I think "grey" can be good, too.

 

AnnieLaurie- I did indeed follow your comments about George Sanders. And I love Sunset Boulevard- another "grey" movie. Can you imagine pitching the script to a movie executive nowadays? "It's about an aging movie star (gasp) and her gigolo, oh, and she has a pet monkey........" I can hear the execs now..." We have to cast someone over 40?"

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

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Izcutter- very interesting. You are right- the producers are between a rock and a hard place. In our day and age, it seems that people aren't allowed even a single mistake - their careers are on the line every time they start a picture. It's like sports team managers- one bad season can cost them their job.

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*...we have had many a conversation about how most film makers don't seem to have any real sense of accountability to their audience anymore.*

 

Hi Rohanaka

 

I have a sense of this too. Some modern films are a bit fanciful in the storytelling. I don?t mind a bit of complexity and I know that devices such topsy-turvey narrative structures and the meshing of dream and reality and other similar devices that were much less prevalent in the Golden Age are used today but it ought to be at least well done and not lead the viewer astray. I don?t want the elements of a story handed to me on a silver platter but I don?t want to led on a wild goose chase either (to mix metaphors). Here is a paraphrase of a Coen Bros Director?s Cut comment from The Man Who Wasn?t There: "Well, we put this scene here blah blah...but we thought maybe that wouldn't make sense blah blah...so we tried to put it there blah blah blah...we ended up just leaving it there because we didn't know where to put it, but we wanted to leave it somewhere in there because we liked the scene." I groan when I hear stuff like that. I think, in contrast, did Woody Allen or Alfred Hitchcock think that way? Maybe they did a little bit but maybe if a scene doesn?t seem to work it?s a good idea to reject it altogether? Of course, maybe it?s not fair comparing using these two but I admire how they seem to know what they wanted to do and they did while at the same time being fair to the audience. I think a lot of filmmakers, and this includes the major studios, just throw in gratuitous stuff (including the ?adult? content and language) just to jazz it up although they get in the way of either the message or the interpretation of the story and accountability to the audience gets thrown by the wayside.

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*MissG*, thank you for your fussbudgets. I've copied your list to Word so I can refer to it later. Sadly, though some of the films are rather famous, there are some I haven't seen and others that are not immediately recallable. You mention Clifton Webb who is another that might be considered in the quintessential group of fussbudgets. He was absolutely splendid The Razor's Edge, an excellent character in that film and an excellent fussbudget as well. Jessica Tandy certainly is germane to the idea as well as Paul Lynde and Frank Morgan. Was that "Wonderful Whiz of a Wiz," a sort of fussbudget? Hmm, trying to recall.

:)

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That comment by the Coen Brothers explains why "The Man Who Wasn't There" is my least favorite of their movies. Most of their movies are quite well thought out and storyboarded (one of the reason I like them). Of course, even Hitch and Woody Allen have made flawed movies.....

 

My requirements for new movies are that they be thoughtful, and that they take me somewhere I have never been before, either internally or externally. I don't want to guess the formula of the picture before I even get through the credits....unfortunately, The Man Who Wasn't There was rather predictable and uninteresting.

 

Wall-E was an incredibly good movie in which I was literally spellbound for the entire show. I had no idea where the plot was going, but I had no doubt that it WAS going somewhere. It was charming, imaginative and had all the qualities of an old movie. It started where no one in their right mind would place a kid's movie, but thanks to some very imaginative and daring writing, it wound up being one of the best movies I've seen this year....

 

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*One man may do something ethically wrong in his business, but then turn around and give his home to a fatherless baby....*

 

Hi JackFavell

 

...although, if I may point out, that there was a bit of selfishness with regard to baby ;) ...but you are right, these movies provide a good example of "grey." Although morally flawed in his business dealings there is no doubt that this character is a decent sort. He has a genuine regard for Fanny even before he knew about the baby. One of the delights in watching these characters is their humanity, their realness. But you put it best when you point out the "non-judgemental tone" of the movies. Even though they lie to each other, cheat at cards, etc., we don't really judge them either, and if we did we would probably forgive them in no time. Gray can be quite charming.

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Hello Lafitte--Nice to meet you--( I warn you now--I speak no French beyond the words French Toast or perhaps French Dressing or French Fries...so will have to converse in English--please don't rat me out to any politicians because I certainly don't want to start THAT sort of war on this site!!) :-) I have read some of your other posts--sometimes I feel like I am eavesdropping because I have no idea what you folks are talking about. For the record, I do share an appreciation for classical music with you, but sadly lack any education to be able to carry on any sort of intelligent conversation about it. --So--on with my reply:

 

but we wanted to leave it somewhere in there because we liked the scene

 

I think if you could get inside the heads of a lot of present day film makers you'd hear them say that only to themselves. I am not a huge Coen bros fan--but do enjoy some of their films Have not seen this one however. I think it is rather humorous that they had the self-confidence to admit it--I won't call it arrogance since I guess they have the right to spend their money however they want. But it is a very refreshing thought to actually hear someone admit such a thing.

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But my words, opinions, and beliefs are not more valuable than yours. For me to think so would be selfish.

 

*Frank/Scott/or Mr.Gray* (or is it grey?--I am still trying to figure out which is right) :-) I appreciate this comment almost more than all the rest. Because sometimes people who have a more defined (black and white) perspective on life get accused of that awful thing no one ever wants to be called (you know...intolerance) but in reality we are usually the ones who are offered little of what everyone else seems to enjoy....the right to speak our minds. So thank you for saying that.

 

Don't know if I am a good writer--but I try to write as I speak and sometimes my mouth gets ahead of my brain, so it comes out a little jumbled. I spend a lot of time around short people (our code word for kids) :-) so anytime I can talk to anyone about anything other than Elmo I start chatting away!

 

And PS--If you are happy being called Mr Grey-- I will take "black and white lady" as a compliment! Alway nice to meet a friend. :-)

 

*PSS--Miss Goddess* --next time you are in there getting tea--practice what I do when it gets too racey----fingers in ears, eyes closed and just keep repeating....La-la-la-la!! :-)

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Hola, Rambly -- He did what he thought was the right thing. Was it truly

the "right" thing?

 

And there you have it, Mr Gray---the point being he did what he thought was right.

If he didn't think at all and come to a decision, he'd have gone on and on just the

way things were, which is what I've been saying I don't like in a film.

 

Ahhh, I now see. Yes, "Jeff" does make a fateful decision. He figured something

had to be done.

 

And this, by the way, is as 'gray" as I can stand for my characters to be.

 

:D "Scarlett" and "Rhett" are "grey." They both do good and bad. "Ashley" and

"Melanie" are wearing the "white hats."

 

"Raven" isn't really posited as a "hero" either, yet he ends up doing the right thing at last.

 

He plays the "hero" role. We end up pulling for him.

 

The point isn't really about what the character did before nor was he at all glorified as he would be today, it's how the character's personal story culminates---just as with Ethan Edwards,

if he never changed at that last minute toward Debbie, we simply would not have a good

movie called The Searchers. Not only would Ethan have failed, the film would have

failed. In every example you have given, the character, though 'gray' as you describe

him (I call it human), still makes a decision to do what is right because they think

it's right, not because they're going to jail or anything so simplistic like that.

 

Of the small amount of contemporary films I have seen, most of the "heroes" do make the "right" decision and it's not to save their bacon. I guess I'm watching the wrong movies.

 

I haven't seen enough contemporary films to say for sure, but I still believe the majority

of them feature a hero who ultimately does right.

 

I have seen many contemporary films, and like the article I posted said, they are

predominantly showing "cartoonish" "heroes", not the kind of people anyone can relate

to.

 

There are many qualities that I can relate to with Superman and Batman. I also believe many westerns can be seen as "superheroish." Some can also be seen as "cartoonish."

 

There is simplicity and then there is complexity. It would be nice if life was full of simplicity but it's mostly full of complexity, especially when it comes to people. It would be so much easier to just place a white hat on this person and a black one on this one and be done with it. There's not much thinking or emotional investment involved in that. The best way to rally people is to simplify things for them through oversimplification. But darn that "grey." It always gets in the way.

 

These impressions aren't made up or imaginary nor are they overstated. The

fact that this same refrain has been talked and written about for the last 30 or 40 years

should tell us that it's a genuine concern. I also am familiar with the folks who are

making decisions regarding what films get made and what films do not and I can assure

you this issue isn't a big concern for them.

 

Money is what drives the film industry. If it sells, they'll make more and more of it. If it doesn't, out it goes. The biggest ticket buyer today is a 12-year-old boy. That's where the money is. This doesn't mean every movie made today is aimed at this huge audience. It's just that particular target audience makes money for the studios.

 

I believe the article even discussed your heartwarming favorite, No Country for Old Men.

 

SPOILER ALERT

 

Uh-huh. No Country for Old Men is interesting because there is a white hat, a grey hat, and a black hat in the film. Mr. Grey is the one who bites the dust. The "moral of the story" in No Country for Old Men, at least to me, is that it takes fearless young men to combat the on-going, never-ending fight against bad. Why never-ending? Because wherever there is money or something to be gained, you will find bad. "It's the dismal tide."

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A wonderful evening to you and yours, Rohanaka -- Frank/Scott/or Mr.Gray (or is it grey?--I am still trying to figure out which is right)

 

In our country, "gray" is the correct spelling. I merely choose "grey" because I like that spelling more. Or maybe it's because I've watched one too many Greer Garson movies. :D

 

But my words, opinions, and beliefs are not more valuable than yours. For me to think so would be selfish.

 

I appreciate this comment almost more than all the rest. Because sometimes people who have a more defined (black and white) perspective on life get accused of that awful thing no one ever wants to be called (you know...intolerance) but in reality we are usually the ones who are offered little of what everyone else seems to enjoy....the right to speak our minds. So thank you for saying that.

 

You are welcome, but there is no need to thank me.

 

I enjoy hearing the opinions of others, even if they are different than my own. And I don't need to be right to be happy. You may have my seat, and I will stand. Why? Because if one is comfortable with their beliefs, they shouldn't feel threatened by others and their beliefs. I don't wish for everyone to think like me. What a horrendous thought! I just love the different personalities and thoughts of people. I find it to be life-enriching.

 

I also find it troubling to reject someone just because they are different. It just doesn't seem very human to push someone away just because they are different than you.

 

Don't know if I am a good writer--but I try to write as I speak and sometimes my mouth gets ahead of my brain, so it comes out a little jumbled.

 

You are a good writer, and I do sense that you write like you speak. I like that you're not shy. You speak your mind. I admire that. You actually remind me of JackieF (who I like a lot), although you are very different in some areas.

 

I spend a lot of time around short people (our code word for kids) so anytime I can talk to anyone about anything other than Elmo I start chatting away!

 

I'm glad you have found an outlet here. I have enjoyed reading your words. You make a lot of sense and I do love your conviction. I can tell you are being yourself, which tells me you are very comfortable. That's a very positive thing.

 

I hope you understand that my speaking up for "grey" doesn't mean I think you are wrong. That would be far from the truth. And I must repeat, I DO like "black-and-white" films and "white" characters and heroes.

 

And PS--If you are happy being called Mr Grey-- I will take "black and white lady" as a compliment! Alway nice to meet a friend.

 

I was definitely being complimentary with "black and white lady." I believe your viewpoint represents the majority on this board, and I'm glad for that. I like such optimism and positivity. And don't tell ButterscotchGreer this, but I love that she loves happy endings, sappy romance, and weddings. :)

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I enjoy hearing the opinions of others, even if they are different than my own

 

Scott--now you know why I am on here from time to time as well! :-)

 

*Ok--now I have something to confess to you--and not just you but to MissGoddess and to anyone else on here who may have been on this site about this same time last year.*...

 

I am so embarrassed to have to admit this because I did not think I would find myself in so many real conversations with you guys...when I first started "dipping my toes in the water" I tried to just make a few comments--or talk here and there--and move on--and then I got the rotten idea for the Sgt York thing...and it sort of sucked me in deeper--so now I am really on this site a lot more than I planned. I have been on this board before under a different name. Who I was then doesn't really matter because you probably won't remember me, but I will say that when I was here before, I enjoyed talking to you folks very much. (I work in the school system and have a lot more free time in the summer) I got off of here last year because this board became way too important to my daily routine...and I was becoming convicted that I was spending too much time on here. (Another Black and White moment for me) :-) I am again suffering some of those same thoughts lately--but am trying to stay better organized and not stay up so late--stay on so long--etc. So maybe can handle it for a while--will have to wait and see.

 

I really appreciate all the conversations I have had here--especially these last few days--and I just want to thank you for putting up with my "ramblings" . (This is an excellent title for a thread) :-)

 

I hope you will forgive me for not coming forward sooner--I feel pretty silly about it now--At any rate I am not surprised that I have run into some of the same folks as last time---and ended up spending so much time talking with you--you are all very nice folks. And some of you I haven't really spoken with yet--Butterscotchgreer--you and I once stayed up till the wee hours laughing ourselves silly about McClintock--I still remember that. Maybe sometime we will find ourselves in another conversation.

 

So for those of you who knew me a year ago--please forgive me for not being totally up front with you from the beginning and I hope you will not hold it against me. For those of you who I have only recently met--I am enjoying our conversations very much and look forward to getting to hear more about your favorite movie moments.

 

Thanks for letting me get this off my chest--and blessings to you.

 

Your friend, Kathy.

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Howdy, Pilgrim -- Ok--now I have something to confess to you--and not just you but to MissGoddess and to anyone else on here who may have been on this site about this same time last year....

 

Uh-oh. If we're talking confessionals, we'll be here for years listening to Miss G "ramble." :P:P

 

I am so embarrassed to have to admit this because I did not think I would find myself in so many real conversations with you guys...when I first started "dipping my toes in the water" I tried to just make a few comments--or talk here and there--and move on--and then I got the rotten idea for the Sgt York thing

 

You need to free yourself of this Sergeant York "thread" guilt you have because your thread and words about the film are wonderful. They are YOURS, and there's nothing wrong with that. You shouldn't let CineSage or those who turned the thread a little ugly make you feel so bad. What you wrote and how you wrote it were lovely. And how you replied to CineSage was just as lovely.

 

and it sort of sucked me in deeper--so now I am really on this site a lot more than I planned. I have been on this board before under a different name.

 

Say what?! You big faker! I hate such deception. I feel betrayed. How could you do this to us? How? You should be ashamed!

 

:D:P Well, not really. No matter your name, you are very welcome here, Quiet Gal.

 

Who I was then doesn't really matter because you probably won't remember me,

 

Oh, no? Ye of little faith.

 

http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=110524&tstart=405

 

It's no wonder I think of you as a good writer. You're also very creative.

 

but I will say that when I was here before, I enjoyed talking to you folks very much. (I work in the school system and have a lot more free time in the summer) I got off of here last year because this board became way too important to my daily routine...and I was becoming convicted that I was spending too much time on here. (Another Black and White moment for me) I am again suffering some of those same thoughts lately--but am trying to stay better organized and not stay up so late--stay on so long--etc. So maybe can handle it for a while--will have to wait and see.

 

I remember you saying those words to me before. It's very true, this board can be very addictive. I'm living proof of that. But you're a very smart girl with her priorities in order. I'm sure of that.

 

I really appreciate all the conversations I have had here--especially these last few days--and I just want to thank you for putting up with my "ramblings" . (This is an excellent title for a thread)

 

You're a breath of fresh air, especially when compared to Miss G and Butterscotch and their horrible tastes. :)

 

I hope you will forgive me for not coming forward sooner--I feel pretty silly about it now--At any rate I am not surprised that I have run into some of the same folks as last time---and ended up spending so much time talking with you--you are all very nice folks. And some of you I haven't really spoken with yet--Butterscotchgreer--you and I once stayed up till the wee hours laughing ourselves silly about McClintock--I still remember that. Maybe sometime we will find ourselves in another conversation.

 

Butterscotch doesn't talk to anyone anymore. Or is that just me? :)

 

So for those of you who knew me a year ago--please forgive me for not being totally up front with you from the beginning and I hope you will not hold it against me.

 

I don't think I'll ever get over this, Kathy. :) Okay, I'm over it.

 

I greatly appreciated your farewell message to me last year. I thought that was very sweet of you. I don't forget things like that. ;)

 

Welcome back! I hope your family is well.

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Ro- one of the great things about this place is that it is OK to voice opinions. I have seen people get slammed, but for the most part, everyone here is pretty good-natured and non-judgemental (that word again!). This thread is full of kind hearted, intelligent people who never seem to mind talking to those of us who are relative newcomers. I have been very happy here, and I hope you will be too.

 

As for spending too much time on the boards..... well, that hits a little too close for comfort with me! I understand how hard it is to complete a sentence sometimes around the wee folk, since I have my own to look after. I hope you'll consider staying longer this time- it is nice to have you around.

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Oh Mr Grey-- (no longer fighting the "a") :-) --now you have made me cry. (and I am not just saying that). I really did not think anyone would remember me because you guys have had a whole year's worth of people to talk with. (which is also one of the reasons I decided to stay "quiet" so long.) Not to mention the fact I made my exit with this big "I have to leave" speech--(too embarassing to think about right now). For pete's sake where did you find that link--I think I only got one or two replies on it and I figured it was long dead and buried. Thanks for the memory.

 

Jack--I am having fun getting to know you and I agree with what the greyman said--I think we must have a lot in common.

 

Now I did not "out" myself to make everyone say how much they missed me--so please folks---no more tears for me--but thank you for your kindness to me and I look forward to chatting some more! :-)

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It's worth a lot. Thank you--and I think there were others who posted there that also tried to maintain the spirit of that thread to the best of their ability too--but I really am having a hard time here because I can't take too much more of this folks. (I only like other people's drama on tv--can't handle my own too well.) :-) Plus I feel like this has turned into the Kathy show--not my intent at all--Please--let's give Miss Goddess back her thread- How about talking about my favorite movie of all time--since I can talk about it now that I am no longer anonymous....The Quiet Man. John Wayne is one of my all time favorite actors Maureen O'Hara--all time favorite actress too (so now you know why I started the thread about her over in the Favorites) and this film is my very favorite film wth the two of them together. What a combo!

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There is simplicity and then there is complexity. It would be nice if life was full of simplicity but it's mostly full of complexity, especially when it comes to people. It would be so much easier to just place a white hat on this person and a black one on this one and be done with it. There's not much thinking or emotional investment involved in that. The best way to rally people is to simplify things for them through oversimplification. But darn that "grey." It always gets in the way.

 

Mr Grey,

 

Will you please stick to the pony you traded for and stop trying to switch horses in midstream? (Sorry I just came from a screening of The Wild Bunch) You just got through saying movies don't have to reflect real life for you to appreciate them so I don't understand the above paragraph

at all.

 

Yours truly,

 

"Toddy"

 

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