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Best "Under the Radar" Films Noir


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*I would agree with Femme Fatale--it is more like a SPIRAL STAIRCASE. But there is definitely no "comfort zone" in this one, as stated below. But for those who enjoyed this movie, I'd recommend his follow-up effort from 1946--SO DARK THE NIGHT, also a Columbia film. This one seems more of a noir to me than MNISR.*

 

I don't think I've ever seen *So Dark the Night*, but it sounds like a good recommendation, thanks blackhangman! B-)

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> {quote:title=blackhangman wrote:}{quote}But for those who enjoyed this movie, I'd recommend his follow-up effort from 1946--SO DARK THE NIGHT, also a Columbia film. This one seems more of a noir to me than MNISR.

>

>

 

Thank you for the tip about So Dark the Night, I hadn't heard of that one before but will

look out for it.

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From your list, ChiO, I finally saw *Black Angel* and I did like it. It's some of the best work

I've yet seen from Dan Duryea, who never disappoints anyway. The ending was VERY moving

to me, it almost brought me to tears, which as I've said elsewhere, is a very rare experience

for me with film noir.

 

What happened to this director (Roy William Neill)? Never heard of him before.

 

*June Vincent* looks like a doppelganger for *Ann Todd*.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

>

> What happened to this director (Roy William Neill)? Never heard of him before.

 

Hi, Miss G:

 

Neill was a good, workmanlike director who really came into his own in the early to mid-1940s at Universal. He directed one of the best in their horror series: FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN, 1943, but his real fame lies in his helming of the studio's Sherlock Holmes films with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.

 

Sadly, THE BLACK ANGEL was his last film. Shortly after completing it, Neill went to England to visit some relatives and, while there, died of a heart attack. He was only 59.

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Thank you for filling me in, nightwalker. That's sad about his early death.

 

What do any of you make of the set design in this movie? I thought it the most bizarre

I think I've ever seen in a film noir. That dame's apartment! It looked like a snake den, ha!

Those weirdly painted wall mirrors. Even the nightclub, "Rio's", was oddly laid out and

looked like no other club I've ever seen. Interesting.

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*Sadly, THE BLACK ANGEL was his last film. Shortly after completing it, Neill went to England to visit some relatives and, while there, died of a heart attack. He was only 59.*

 

That's sad to hear (especially on Halloween). I really enjoyed *Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man*, it's one of my favourite Universal horror flicks.

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A decade before Neill directed the Holmes movies, he was doing excellent work at Columbia. Among his efforts there were films like JEALOUSY, THE NINTH GUEST, THE MENACE (w/Bette Davis) and my favorite Neill film, BLACK MOON from 1934. All great movies if you can locate them.

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*A decade before Neill directed the Holmes movies, he was doing excellent work at Columbia. Among his efforts there were films like JEALOUSY, THE NINTH GUEST, THE MENACE (w/Bette Davis) and my favorite Neill film, BLACK MOON from 1934. All great movies if you can locate them.*

 

They sound like very interesting movies. I sure hope TCM might play them once in a while!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I revisited a noir-gothic-melodrama-musical-screwball comedy last night: *Lured* (Douglas Sirk, 1947), starring George Sanders, Lucille Ball, Charles Coburn and Cedric Hardwicke, also with Boris Karloff, George Zucco and Alan Napier. The first question it raises is whether it is a film in search of a genre, or intentionally a cross-genre movie. Since it is a Sirk movie, I lean toward the later. Young beautiful women disappear after answering personal ads, and the murderer teases the police with Baudelaire-style poetry. Ball is the bait to catch him. There are moments that are reminiscent of M, but the wisecracking Ball and insane Karloff add other dimensions. The detail and breadth of the frame is pure Sirk and the cinematography by William Daniels (The Naked City, Winchester '73, A Streetcar Named Desire) is outstanding. Not a great film noir and not quite up to the Sirk to come, but well worth renting.

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I think I have seen *Lured* a while ago, but I probably should watch it again. Douglas Sirk

directed Lucille Ball is quite a combination.

 

Sirk, of course, directed George Sanders in one of his greatest roles, in A Scandal in Paris.

 

And William Daniels was also Greta Garbo's cinematographer of choice.

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*And William Daniels was also Greta Garbo's cinematographer of choice.*

 

He did do a little thing called Ninotchka, didn't he? And *Camille* ... and *Anna Karenina* ... and *Grand Hotel* .... Quite a resume. Did I mention Foolish Wives? And Valley of the Dolls? (oops) Nearly 50 years as a cinematographer. That's almost James Wong Howe territory.

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CHIO: Have you seen *The Furies* yet? Moirafinnie posted a thread on it in "Favorites"

and elsewhere and I thought you said you hadn't seen it a couple months back when I originally

posted about it. If you have seen it, I'd love to see your "review" in Moira's thread.

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