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Hello, Norma Jean!


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mari26.jpg

 

MissM was originally wearing wide-sleeved shorts...

but I photoshopped her to make it look like a skirt.

Tres cute, n'est-ce pas?

 

Hey, is that a little sailor hat she's wearing? Hmm,

I wonder if laffite has an open billet on the crew list.

Maybe I can recruit her. She might be good for morale.

 

;)

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> {quote:title=laffite wrote:}{quote}

> MissM was originally wearing wide-sleeved shorts...

> but I photoshopped her to make it look like a skirt.

> Tres cute, n'est-ce pas?

>

> Hey, is that a little sailor hat she's wearing? Hmm,

> I wonder if laffite has an open billet on the crew list.

> Maybe I can recruit her. She might be good for morale.

>

> ;)

 

tsk tsk tsk - having fun with photoshop? I think she looks adorable and would be just as adorable with either wide-sleeved shorts or a short skirt. The little sailor hat is the key accessory here, imho. ;)

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_FF wrote:_

 

*tsk tsk tsk - having fun with photoshop?*

 

Yep. :D

 

*I think she looks adorable and would be just as adorable with either wide-sleeved shorts or a short skirt.*

 

C'est exact!

 

*The little sailor hat is the key accessory here, imho. ;)*

 

Not for me :)

 

_MissG wrote:_

 

*What a darling picture of your FIRST MATE. :D*

 

Good idea! I've contacted the yeoman to alter the orders. We'll find another Morale Officer. I like the idea of First Mate. ;)

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> {quote:title=laffite wrote:}{quote}

> Good idea! I've contacted the yeoman to alter the orders. We'll find another Morale Officer. I like the idea of First Mate. ;)

 

Why am I not surprised you like the idea? Surely, that would be an ideal First Mate to have when sailing around the world. ;)

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Your first mate is ready for her first fishing lesson! Just be careful or she'll catch you in her net. ;)

>

 

Miss G, your talent for finding the perfect photograph is just amazing. Did you ever consider a career as a photo editor? ;)

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*Your first mate is ready for her first fishing lesson! Just be careful or she'll catch you in her net. ;)*

 

I'm not a careful person...especially when it's to my advantage.

 

;)

 

(MissG, you are Goddess-on-the-Spot with how fast you come up with these pics.)

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_FilmFatale wrote:_

 

*.. or by the swimming pool*

 

*...or if you prefer here sitting still*

 

You know the It Girl, right? Well, MM is the Anywhere Girl.

She seems to look nice wherever she is.

 

(I'm not able to watch Youtube but I gather

that was a montage of beach scenes)

 

_MissG wrote:_

 

*Did you just call me Spot White? :P*

 

Gosh, MissG, I'm not sure. If it's something good, then yes :)

I'm not sure what Spot White is...but it has a nice ring

to it. ;)

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> {quote:title=laffite wrote:}{quote}

> _FilmFatale wrote:_

>

> *.. or by the swimming pool*

>

> *...or if you prefer here sitting still*

>

> You know the It Girl, right? Well, MM is the Anywhere Girl.

> She seems to look nice wherever she is.

>

> (I'm not able to watch Youtube but I gather

> that was a montage of beach scenes)

>

 

Not scenes but photos, set to some nice music B-)

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Did anyone here catch the Walter Mirisch special? He was able to speak quite knowledgeably about Marilyn and her involvement in *Some Like It Hot* - he didn't seem too harsh (at least not to me) but did have to acknowledge certain issues - while not minimizing her creative genius! B-)

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I watched DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK yet again last night. This movie sure would

fit in Professor ChiO's class in terms of voyeurism, though it might not be considered

hard core enough.

 

I agree, it would certainly fit in the voyeurism class. Although the film isn't about

voyeurism it does play a big part.

 

I really love this movie. Does anyone else like it?

 

Yes, I like it a lot. It reminds me of Fourteen Hours, which is a film that has

really grown on me with repeat watchings. Both films are dealing with serious

subjects.

 

I find it interesting that the persona which Richard Widmark became so famous

for---the sneering, sarcastic wise guy---is specifically why his girlfriend is rejecting

him. So, instead of rooting for him or going along with Widmark-as-Widmark, we're

asked to see him as Ann Bancroft's character does and to question everything

about it. And, on the other hand, we have Marilyn's character who sees him as

she believes, as all the kindly things Ann wants him to be. Last night was the first

time this aspect of the story occurred to me, as well as the obvious

peeking-through-windows and eavesdropping that takes place throughout.

 

I felt "Lyn" was correct about "Jed" and his nature but I thought she was very

condescending towards him. As the film goes on, we see Jed's better side and

this helps us view him in a different light. He does have a heart, it's just that he

likes to hide that from Lyn. I also believe Jed's encounter with "Nell" wakes him up.

He realizes just how much Lyn means to him. I don't think either person is all

that loving.

 

Nell is who I love the most in the film since I'm a sucker for girls who are hurting.

She definitely needs help, but I think real love would go a long way with her. But that

would be tough for any man to provide since she is still grieving the loss of her

boyfriend.

 

Don't Bother to Knock presents us with how painful the aftermath of

war and tragedy can be like for many women, especially young ones. Some may

never get over their loss.

 

I really liked Marilyn's performance. I would have never guessed her Nell was what

she was but she slowly brought this out as the film progressed. I was impressed.

I have already learned one thing: Marilyn can act.

 

dontbothertoknock1-1.jpg

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Thanks for bringing this back up.

 

> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}>

> I agree, it would certainly fit in the voyeurism class. Although the film isn't about

> voyeurism it does play a big part.

>

 

I never particularly noticed this aspect until recently. The *radio* is what I tuned into first (ha!).

That, and the windows of course.

 

Both Jed and Nell are listening to Lyn singing on the radio

hook-up in their rooms when they first notice each other. They're both restless and Lyn's

song ironically seems to underscore their different longings and it also makes Lyn strangely

"present". This is when I began to notice how the songs she sings cue and hilight what the

characters are thinking or feeling. I think this may be one of the most interesting things about

the way the film is directed. It's obvious and yet it's so carefully done, I never paid much

attention before until I started looking at the subtitles.

 

DB2K-22.jpg?t=1222897763

 

DB2K-59.jpg?t=1222898006

 

DB2K-60.jpg?t=1222898931

 

> I really love this movie. Does anyone else like it?

>

> Yes, I like it a lot. It reminds me of Fourteen Hours, which is a film that has

> really grown on me with repeat watchings. Both films are dealing with serious

> subjects.

>

 

I never thought to compare them before but there are similarities. Maybe Marilyn and Richard

Basehart should have gotten together. Too bad her hotel wasn't across from his. :P

 

 

>

> I felt "Lyn" was correct about "Jed" and his nature but I thought she was very

> condescending towards him. As the film goes on, we see Jed's better side and

> this helps us view him in a different light. He does have a heart, it's just that he

> likes to hide that from Lyn. I also believe Jed's encounter with "Nell" wakes him up.

> He realizes just how much Lyn means to him. I don't think either person is all

> that loving.

>

 

I never noticed how hard she comes down on Jed until recently, either. Now I think

he takes her lecturing rather well.

 

DB2K-30.jpg?t=1222899155

 

DB2K-36.jpg?t=1222899223

 

DB2K-44.jpg?t=1222899335

 

DB2K-45.jpg?t=1222899365

 

 

> Nell is who I love the most in the film since I'm a sucker for girls who are hurting.

> She definitely needs help, but I think real love would go a long way with her. But that

> would be tough for any man to provide since she is still grieving the loss of her

> boyfriend.

>

> Don't Bother to Knock presents us with how painful the aftermath of

> war and tragedy can be like for many women, especially young ones. Some may

> never get over their loss.

>

 

Yes, lots of movies showed how men had to cope with the aftermath, but this is one

of the rare ones that really goes into what a woman suffers from it.

 

DB2K-102.jpg?t=1222899621

 

DB2K-103.jpg?t=1222899721

 

DB2K-104.jpg?t=1222899749

 

DB2K-105.jpg?t=1222899781

 

DB2K-106.jpg?t=1222899811

 

 

> I really liked Marilyn's performance. I would have never guessed her Nell was what

> she was but she slowly brought this out as the film progressed. I was impressed.

> I have already learned one thing: Marilyn can act.

>

 

Well, if you came away with only that it would be a lot. It's too bad she didn't get more

roles like this, and that this one didn't bring her much attention.

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Thanks for bringing this back up.

 

A magical bunny did it, not me. :P

 

I agree, it would certainly fit in the voyeurism class. Although the film isn't about

voyeurism it does play a big part.

 

I never particularly noticed this aspect until recently. The radio is what I tuned into first (ha!).

That, and the windows of course.

 

Oh, don't pretend as if you're not a peeping goddess.

 

Both Jed and Nell are listening to Lyn singing on the radio hook-up in their rooms

when they first notice each other. They're both restless and Lyn's song ironically

seems to underscore their different longings and it also makes Lyn strangely

"present".

 

This is when I began to notice how the songs she sings cue and hilight what the

characters are thinking or feeling. I think this may be one of the most interesting things about

the way the film is directed. It's obvious and yet it's so carefully done, I never paid much

attention before until I started looking at the subtitles.

 

Excellent! I didn't catch the lyrics. You are on it. Jed cannot escape Lyn's voice,

be it the one in the hotel or the one in his head or the one in his heart.

 

I never thought to compare them before but there are similarities. Maybe Marilyn

and Richard Basehart should have gotten together. Too bad her hotel wasn't across

from his.

 

Nell would have had to been a guy.

 

I never noticed how hard she comes down on Jed until recently, either. Now I think

he takes her lecturing rather well.

 

He does take the lecture quite well. Why? Because he actually does care about her.

 

Yes, lots of movies showed how men had to cope with the aftermath, but this is one

of the rare ones that really goes into what a woman suffers from it.

 

This is what I found most fascinating with Don't Bother to Knock. I was pleasantly

surprised to see just how serious the film really is. I wasn't prepared for that. Marilyn

actually played a cruel girl, a cruelty that stemmed from her own misery. What a

terrific "case study" film.

 

"Uncle Eddie" was kind to Nell but he wasn't all that sympathetic. This made me care

for Nell more.

 

Well, if you came away with only that it would be a lot. It's too bad she didn't get more

roles like this, and that this one didn't bring her much attention.

 

It's such a serious film, so I doubt many came away liking it all that much. I really like

it. The Misfits is still my favorite "Marilyn" film but this one is close for me. I'm

not sure any of her other films will reach the level of these two. I'm thinking

Niagara may come close. I'm not counting Clash by Night and

The Asphalt Jungle.

 

Foreshadowing

 

dontbothertoknock2-1.jpg

 

The first revelation of Nell not being who we think she is.

 

dontbothertoknock3.jpg

 

dontbothertoknock4.jpg

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>

> Excellent! I didn't catch the lyrics. You are on it. Jed cannot escape Lyn's voice,

> be it the one in the hotel or the one in his head or the one in his heart.

>

 

In their first scenes together, she sings what his character is about...

 

DB2K-00.jpg?t=1222902731

 

DB2K-000.jpg?t=1222902776

 

...and then her very next tune takes up her own agenda:

 

DB2K-001.jpg?t=1222902837

 

DB2K-002.jpg?t=1222902913

 

DB2K-003.jpg?t=1222902946

 

DB2K-004.jpg?t=1222902976

 

 

> I never thought to compare them before but there are similarities. Maybe Marilyn

> and Richard Basehart should have gotten together. Too bad her hotel wasn't across

> from his.

>

> Nell would have had to been a guy.

>

 

What do you mean?

 

 

>

> This is what I found most fascinating with Don't Bother to Knock. I was pleasantly

> surprised to see just how serious the film really is. I wasn't prepared for that. Marilyn

> actually played a cruel girl, a cruelty that stemmed from her own misery. What a

> terrific "case study" film.

>

 

I always sensed something very cold about her behavior with the little girl. I now think

maybe Nell was jealous of everything that girl had, and sort of took for granted (she is

a bit precocious). I think Nell probably resented her from the start. I think that's pretty

wild, daring even and that the director deserves credit for being able to make something

that subtle visually evident.

 

For instance, did you notice their different reactions to the fairy tale story Nell reads?

Nell was all into it and I think she saw herself in the story, whereas to "Bunny" it was

just another bed time story that made her sleepy. Nell wants to made beautiful and

be surrounded by beauty and love like the heroine in the tale:

 

DB2K-03.jpg?t=1222903355

 

I think Nell sees herself as the little bird who isn't singing. She's waiting for her prince

to find her again and set her free.

DB2K-04.jpg?t=1222903385

 

DB2K-05.jpg?t=1222903418

 

DB2K-06.jpg?t=1222903449

 

DB2K-07.jpg?t=1222903482

 

DB2K-08.jpg?t=1222903516

 

DB2K-09.jpg?t=1222903546

 

DB2K-10.jpg?t=1222903577

 

> "Uncle Eddie" was kind to Nell but he wasn't all that sympathetic. This made me care

> for Nell more.

>

 

You can get an idea what her parents were like through Eddie, only they were probably

much harder on her. Maybe without knowing any better, but she came from hard times.

 

> Well, if you came away with only that it would be a lot. It's too bad she didn't get more

> roles like this, and that this one didn't bring her much attention.

>

> It's such a serious film, so I doubt many came away liking it all that much. I really like

> it. The Misfits is still my favorite "Marilyn" film but this one is close for me. I'm

> not sure any of her other films will reach the level of these two. I'm thinking

> Niagara may come close. I'm not counting Clash by Night and

> The Asphalt Jungle.

>

 

I think you're right. I don't believe Niagara calls upon too much emotional range from MM.

*Bus Stop* is really the only other film where she gets some good scenes.

 

> Foreshadowing

>

 

I wondered what that first shot signified. Obvious, now, but I didn't get it at first.

 

>

> The first revelation of Nell not being who we think she is.

>

 

I noticed the candy bit, too, and thought it was funny.

 

 

> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}>

> A magical bunny did it, not me. :P

>

 

bunny.jpg

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