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Hello, Norma Jean!


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Wow, finally I can reply to a post on this board.

 

CineMaven---yes, the thumbnails are ANNOYING and I DON'T LIKE THEM but at

least it means I won't have to stop posting pictures entirely (since most of my images

are large).

 

Marlene---good question and it can be daunting to find a reliable biography on Marilyn Monroe.

I'm going to recommend, if you can find it, this one published in 1990:

 

"Marilyn: Life & Legend (The Illustrated, True Story of Marilyn Monroe, Hollywood's Greatest Star, with 450 Photos)" by Susan Doll

 

It's pretty much a run down of the verifiable facts of her life and has the added benefit of

being a lovely coffee-table sized book (you see, I like my picture books LARGE, too, ha!)

with tons of gorgeous pictures. You should be able to get a copy at Amazon's marketplace.

It's as free of rumor and theorizing as you're likely to find.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Maybe we can talk a little Bus Stop one of these days. What do you say?

> From Bus Stop to The Misfits. Ahhhh, the rodeo. Who needs Gable when

> you have Don Murray? Yeeeeeeeeeeehaw!

 

Oh my goodness--it should be declared illegal to say such things!

 

What's your favorite scene in Bus Stop? Did you think Norma Jean acted well?

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Oh my goodness--it should be declared illegal to say such things!

 

:P You always go with the dark, nasty ones, don't you?

 

What's your favorite scene in Bus Stop? Did you think Norma Jean acted well?

 

My favorite scene is the "Gettysburg Address" scene. I'll explain why later on.

 

Norma Jean was very cute, even with her silly accent.

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>

> :P You always go with the dark, nasty ones, don't you?

>

 

Yes! I just got through telling Jackie why I really like Robert Ryan. :)

 

> What's your favorite scene in Bus Stop? Did you think Norma Jean acted well?

>

> My favorite scene is the "Gettysburg Address" scene. I'll explain why later on.

>

 

I'm sure we all can guess why.

 

> Norma Jean was very cute, even with her silly accent.

 

You didn't like the way she says "SHAIR-Reee" or "Hallywood n' Viiiiiiine"?

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Yes! I just got through telling Jackie why I really like Robert Ryan.

 

But Ryan is one of the good ones, unlike Gable.

 

I'm sure we all can guess why.

 

Bite your tongue! Although, I was surprised by some of the sexual nature of Bus Stop.

 

You didn't like the way she says "SHAIR-Reee" or "Hallywood n' Viiiiiiine"?

 

:) I definitely liked how she corrected ol' Bo about her name. But her accent was silly cute.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Yes! I just got through telling Jackie why I really like Robert Ryan.

>

> But Ryan is one of the good ones, unlike Gable.

>

 

Excuse ME but that is flat out wrong. I mean they're BOTH good.

 

>

> Bite your tongue! Although, I was surprised by some of the sexual nature of Bus Stop.

>

 

Why? It's Marilyn.

 

>

> :) I definitely liked how she corrected ol' Bo about her name. But her accent was silly cute.

 

I loved it. I also love the look on her face when she tells him "Cherry" sounds unrefined, it's

hilarious. I sometimes wonder if Marilyn was being unintentionally funny.

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The board has been cruel to me! Still, it's nowhere near as cruel as you are to me. :P

 

Excuse ME but that is flat out wrong. I mean they're BOTH good.

 

Gable is good? When? You know Don Murray is better. :P

 

Bite your tongue! Although, I was surprised by some of the sexual nature of Bus Stop.

 

Why? It's Marilyn.

 

I didn't expect to see it in a film like Bus Stop.

 

I sometimes wonder if Marilyn was being unintentionally funny.

 

I get the feeling you are right about that.

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>

> Gable is good? When? You know Don Murray is better. :P

>

 

Unbelievable.

 

>

> I didn't expect to see it in a film like Bus Stop.

>

 

Really? I wasn't surprised.

 

> I sometimes wonder if Marilyn was being unintentionally funny.

>

> I get the feeling you are right about that.

 

Ha! I watched Don't Bother to Knock tonight and her facial expressions

just break me up!

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Really? I wasn't surprised.

 

I guess since Beau is a virgin, the innuendos are going to be ever present. I'll post

some caps later... hopefully. :)

 

Ha! I watched Don't Bother to Knock tonight and her facial expressions

just break me up!

 

What made you watch that one last night? That's my second favorite Marilyn-Marilyn film

so far.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Really? I wasn't surprised.

>

> I guess since Beau is a virgin, the innuendos are going to be ever present. I'll post

> some caps later... hopefully. :)

>

 

I just can't stand his character. This movie would be so much better without him.

 

> Ha! I watched Don't Bother to Knock tonight and her facial expressions

> just break me up!

>

> What made you watch that one last night? That's my second favorite Marilyn-Marilyn film

> so far.

 

I don't know, I just picked it on impulse since nothing was on television I wanted to watch.

It's one of those movies I just enjoy having on in the background. She's really very good

playing a crazy girl.

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I don't know, I just picked it on impulse since nothing was on television I wanted to watch.

It's one of those movies I just enjoy having on in the background. She's really very good

playing a crazy girl.

 

You would know, Crazy Girl!

 

I just can't stand his character. This movie would be so much better without him.

 

Ohhhh, you know you love him.

 

Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation,

conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now

we're engaged in a great civil war, to determine whether that nation or any nation so

conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met here on a great battlefield of

that war. The world will not long remember, nor little note, what we say here but it will

never forget what they did here. Rather it is for us, the living, to be so concentrated and

so dedicated.

 

busstop7.jpg

 

busstop6.jpg

 

busstop8.jpg

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The Seven Year Itch Plays The Michelob Ultra Cool Film Series 7/3-7/5 at Dayton

Victoria Theatre Association ? Dayton, Ohio

 

Friday, June 19, 2009

 

Are you ready a nostalgic trip down memory lane, complete with FREE popcorn and soda?? Victoria Theatre Association and Heidelberg Distributing Company presents the first film of the Michelob Ultra Cool Film Series, celebrating classic Hollywood with Marilyn Monroe in the captivating and sexy film, The Seven Year Itch, July 3-5, 2009 at the historic Victoria Theatre in downtown Dayton.

 

Released in 1955 and directed by Billy Wilder, The Seven Year Itch was Marilyn Monroe's 23rd film. She stars as the voluptuous blonde who moves in the husband and father Richard Sherman's (Tom Ewell) Manhattan building, causing his imagination to going into overdrive with some very tempting fantasies. Ms. Monroe's famous scene standing over a subway grating in a flowing dress is in this classic film.

 

Films are shown at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and 3 p.m. on Sundays in the air-conditioned comfort of the Victoria Theatre. Recreating the feel of the old-time movie palaces, guests may enjoy free popcorn and soda in the lobby beginning one hour prior to show time, the Mighty Wurlitzer organ concert beginning 30 minutes prior to show time, and a classic cartoon just before the movie. You can see The Seven Year Itch and the rest of the films in the series for just $4.75 each, or $24 for a 10-ticket passbook - a great entertainment bargain in these economically tough times!

 

Passbooks are on sale now through Ticket Center Stage. They may be purchased at the Schuster Center box office in downtown Dayton, by phone at (937) 228-3630 or toll free (888) 228-3630, or online at www.ticketcenterstage.com - click on Victoria Theatre Association, then Michelob Ultra Cool Films.

 

Individual tickets are available day-of-show at the Victoria Theatre box office, beginning one hour prior to showtime.

 

For the full scoop on this summer's series, including video clips and much more, go to www.victoriatheatre.com and click on "Michelob Ultra Cool Films." Be sure to also visit our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter for exclusive Michelob Ultra Cool Films Series updates and offers.

 

The Seven Year Itch, July 3 - 5

 

After sending his wife and son to the country for the summer to escape the Manhattan heat, Richard Sherman enjoys the life of a bachelor - a little too much. When a delightfully unconventional, voluptuous blonde moves in upstairs (a blonde by the name of Marilyn Monroe!) his overactive, over-vivid imagination goes into overdrive.

 

White Christmas, July 10 - 12

 

Enjoy a White Christmas while still wearing your sandals! A cast of stars headlines this classic as World War II buddies turned famous performers, Wallace and Davis, team up with some stunning sisters to help out their beloved old General and his struggling ski lodge.

 

The Sting, July 17 - 19

 

Paul Newman and Robert Redford star as two master con men who pull the scam of a lifetime to get revenge on a corrupt crime boss. With a plot full of surprising twists and the famous ragtime score, the film received 10 Oscar nominations in 1973, winning Best Picture, among others.

 

Jimmy Stewart Weekend, July 24 - 26

 

This summer, the Michelob Ultra Cool Films Series pays tribute to the great Jimmy Stewart, with three of his best: Vertigo, July 24; The Philadelphia Story, July 25; Harvey, July 26.

 

An American in Paris, July 31 - August 2

 

Gene Kelly plays Jerry Mulligan, a struggling American painter in Paris. When he is "discovered" by an influential heiress, Jerry's art isn't the only thing she is after. Joke, sing and dance along with Gene Kelly as this romantic musical unfolds on the streets of Paris.

 

To Kill A Mockingbird, August 7 - 9

 

Set in a small Alabama town, attorney Atticus Finch (Oscar-winner Gregory Peck) risks his career by defending a black man wrongly accused of rape. The adaptation of Harper Lee's timeless novel about racism and tolerance features Robert Duvall in his screen debut as Boo Radley.

 

Funny Girl, August 14 - 16

The 1968 musical about a female singer/comic (Barbra Streisand), and the travails of her life, won Streisand a Best Actress Oscar in her film debut! The song "People" has become a movie musical classic and one of Streisand's best-loved songs.

 

American Graffiti, August 21 - 23

 

Where were you in '62? It's the last night of summer, and the teenagers of Modesto, California, want to have some fun before adult responsibilities close in. Wolfman Jack spins vintage tunes on the radio as the kids contemplate college, score hot dates, get stuck with little sisters, and race the night away in this coming-of-age classic, directed by George Lucas.

 

Phantom of the Opera Weekend, August 28 - 30

 

Spend a weekend in the underworld of the Paris Opera House, as we present three film versions of the timeless classic and celebrate the return of The Phantom of the Opera to the Schuster Center stage in June 2010. We will present the classic 1925 silent version with Lon Chaney (featuring live organ accompaniment), the 1943 Claude Rains version, and the 2004 film version of the Broadway musical. Individual tickets for the Miami Valley & Good Samaritan Hospitals Broadway Series presentation of The Phantom of the Opera will also go on sale that weekend!

 

For more information about the series and Victoria Theatre Association's entire season, visit www.victoriatheatre.com.

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*Discovered: Unpublished Photos Of Marilyn Monroe*

 

 

By Claire O'Neill

 

"Who the hell is Marilyn Monroe?" In 1950, this is what Life wanted to know. Photographer Ed Clark had photographed the budding starlet in Los Angeles' Griffith Park, and sent his prints to the publication. At the time, she was relatively unknown, and there was no interest in the photos -- although a mere two years later, she would grace the cover of Life. These photos went unpublished until about a month ago, when Life.com rediscovered them.

 

 

.............+++++++++==--------.........

Los Angeles Times - ‎Jun 2, 2009‎

 

 

Marilyn Monroe in Griffith Park, circa 1950

 

 

It was 1950, and Life photographer Ed Henry went to Griffith Park to shoot a little-known actress named Marilyn Monroe.

 

The photos show a 24-year-old Monroe walking among the trees and a creek in the park, modeling various outfits, sometimes reading a movie script.

 

 

Life says the photos somehow were stored away -- until now.

 

"The negatives for these photos were recently discovered during our ongoing effort to digitize Life's immense and storied photo archive, including outtakes and entire shoots that never saw the light of day," according to the magazine.

 

 

A few months before the shoot, she had finished her first big supporting role in "Asphalt Jungle." Check out the Marilyn Monroe photos here.

 

 

http://www.life.com/image/88010906/in-gallery/27412/marilyn-neverpublished-photos

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  • 2 weeks later...

Upcoming movies with Marilyn Monroe:

 

On Sunday, July 5, on TCM:

 

*The Asphalt Jungle* (1950) 12pm ET

A gang of small time crooks plots an elaborate jewel heist.

Cast: Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern, Jean Hagen, James Whitmore Dir: John Huston BW-112 mins, TV-PG

 

the-asphalt-jungle.jpg

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Like that photo of Marilyn with Ella. Very classy. The photo I like most is the one you

> call "fur and hat." She seems very relaxed there.

 

Marilyn had a way of wearing fur like it was a bathrobe or a sweater, ha! It's neat.

 

7YearItch-candid.jpg

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