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Hello, Norma Jean!


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>

> ps...On second thought, Miss Monroe, why don't you just jump right out of that tub and tell ole laffite all about it...no?...Oh, okay

>

 

Then you better leave the room first, Monsieur le Pirate, or she's calling 9-1-1! :D

 

dedienes-030.jpg

photo by DeDiennes

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Well, I do think that drinking things out of a glass receptacle tastes better. Like the Coke in plastic bottles just doesn't taste EXACTLY the same as out of the glass bottles.

 

I am too young to know about the milkman delivering milk in glass bottles, though. Growing up in the 1970's, it was already in paper cartons. BTW, also better than plastic milk jugs because the clear plastic lets light in and the milk spoils faster.

 

BUT--I am off topic. Back to Norma Jeane. I love her because she can be sexy AND wholesome all at the same time.

 

Sandy K

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>Then you better leave the room first, Monsieur le Pirate, or she's calling 9-1-1! :D

 

"Okay, Miss Monroe, I'll leave. But have I told you yet how nice you look in a towel."

 

Well, at least I took her mind off whatever she was worried about.

;)

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I watched *Ladies of the Chorus* the other night. A pleasant little diversion? Yes, except for one part that freaked me out. (more on that later) I thought it was a really odd film. Not bad though. It was really interesting to see Marilyn Monroe so early on. I thought she might be more awkward, but she's fine really.

 

She was very sweet here, but not above tackling a smart mouth would be "burlesque" diva when provoked. What she would see in Rand Brooks is beyond me. During her stage numbers she shows more than a few hints of that certain magic that was too follow. It's seems like such a long road from something like this film to Roslyn in *The Misfits*. Hard to believe it was a scant dozen years.

 

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*Mother and Daughter: Adele Jergens and Marilyn Monroe*

 

Some spoilers ahead!! :)

 

You don't get time for a lot of nuance in a film that runs just about an hour. Adele Jergens (originally top billed), played Marilyn's mother (!?!) rather convincingly I thought. It's interesting in how she is so straightforward in her dealings with Brooks. Their talk, when he asks for her consent to marry Peggy, played like a scene in one of those cautionary films they used to show in health class. I thought she might be up to something. Not to worry though. There is something refreshing in how all the film's potential conflicts are worked out relatively easily, without putting any unnecessary stress on the audience.

 

Now Brook's Randy turns into a big wuss and can't bring himself to be honest about Peggy's background when he informs his mother Adele. Nice to see Nana Bryant in that role. It's a little confusing when writing about the film, to have a star and a character in the film with the same first name though. So pay attention. Anyway, this sets up a potentially embarrassing situation for Peggy and Mae when their potential in-law invites them over to get acquainted. Not for dinner or anything, but for a two week visit!

 

Things really start to get interesting now. How will Adele react when she inevitably discovers her future daughter-in-law's true background? When Mae realizes that Randy was a big chicken about the whole thing, she gets worried. Potential mother-in-law Adele decides to throw a big fancy engagement party to introduce Peggy to her social set.

 

This brings us to that "freak out" moment. Sure, I was having a good time, but when Ripple the decorator, played by Dave Barry, and his diminutive sidekick show up and are greeted by Salisbury the Butler, played by Stephen Geray, I suddenly got really uncomfortable. What was happening? Why did they sound like that? Even Salisbury's voice became distorted. Was I experiencing audio problems? Was I having a stroke. My heart began to race! What was going on here? Was I watching some old vaudeville routine or should I call 911? I just found it all very disconcerting! By the time the Bobby True Trio (?) started playing some really crazy number, I began to settle down and figure I was just experiencing some kind of really delayed flashback brought on by overindulgence during my misspent youth.

 

I settled down to see poor Peggy running away embarrassed after having her burlesque background exposed to all of Adele's society types. I had nearly forgotten about Marilyn at this point. No need to worry though. Adele was no snob. She was an understanding sort. How refreshing. I would expect nothing less from Nana Bryant, who would go on to play the delightful Mrs. Chumley in *Harvey*. I didn't want her to be a meany!

 

So anyway, a lot of stuff happens in this short little programmer. It was really interesting to see young Marilyn Monroe, before the legend, as she was just beginning her journey to the heights of stardom. It was also interesting to see this oddball film. At the beginning when we meet Peggy and Mae, I thought things might turn down a darker path, but this was a rather silly, but fairly uplifting film. I left it feeling pretty good. We could all learn something from Adele too. You're never to old...

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Mad Hat---don't worry, it wasn't a "flashback", ha! I was disconcerted by that weird exchange at the door myself. It was really weird. And not, in my opinion, funny at all. Very nice ramble on Ladies of the Chorus, mon ami. Adele Jergens reminds me of Virginia Mayo.

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Thanks goodness! I was worried about that! :) What a totally strange scene just out of nowhere! Obviously I didn't find it funny either.

 

I noticed that Adele Jergens looked like Mayo too. I wonder if anyone has brought that up in the lookalikes thread.

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> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> Thanks goodness! I was worried about that! :) What a totally strange scene just out of nowhere! Obviously I didn't find it funny either.

>

 

It was "surreal". :D

 

I laughted when you said you'd forgot about Marilyn up to that point. It's true, she sort of disappears for a while in the middle. Seeing her is what held my interest.

 

> I noticed that Adele Jergens looked like Mayo too. I wonder if anyone has brought that up in the lookalikes thread.

 

What do you think?

 

7000039_1039479262.jpg

 

virginia-mayo-1940s.jpg

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  • 6 months later...

> {quote:title=butterscotchgreer wrote:}{quote}

> Hey dahlink!

>

> Frankenstein captured and locked me up as his prisoner! Why didn't you come help me?! :P

 

Gross! You poor thing. I'm in need of rescuing myself. Not from Frankenstein, but other monsters.

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  • 5 months later...

...and then I found this super rare image from *The Dangerous Years* (1947), supposedly the first movie Marilyn appeared in and didn't end up on the cutting room floor. I've never seen it and don't know who the actor is.

 

DangerousYearsThe-1.jpg

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Hi MissG, a very interesting pic of MM. I've seen other pictures of her at this time of her life and I've always had the vague impression that there is a sort of ugly-duckling look to her. I know that's an odd thing to say about MM but if there is anything to it, it certainly didn't last long. And I hope it isn't unpleasant to mention that this was prior to some work she had done to her nose, which, by all accounts (I'm sure) improved her rapidly blossoming good looks.

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bonjour, m. le pirate! so nice to see you again, it has been too long. I do hope you are well?

 

I agree this was the "awkward age" for marilyn, but I should love to be so "awkward", ha! I'd like to see the movie it is taken from.

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