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Movie Trivia


daneldorado
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This film had no opening or closing credits in its original version. The film opens with curtains parting to reveal the orchestra entering and taking their places. During the film's intermission, a solitary title card was to be played over the movie theater's closed curtain, reading:

 

(movie title)

 

 

 

I'm guessing that you are referring to the Disney film "Fantasia" (1940).

 

Cheers,

Dan

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pastman wrote:

 

That's a good one.

 

 

I disagree with you.

 

If it were a "good one," you would still be working on it. Apparently I asked a question that anyone can look up quickly, since you answered correctly, less than an hour after I posted it.

 

It's your board now, pastman.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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In keeping with the spirit. This year:

 

Three of the four winning lead-acting performances at the Golden Globes (Kate Winslet in Revolutionary Road, Sally Hawkins in Happy-Go-Lucky, and Colin Farrell for In Bruges ) weren't nominated for the Oscar.

 

The last time this happened was...

 

1. Name the year

 

2. Name the three performers and their relative films

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Dan wrote:

 

Sorry, no. But I'm curious about something.

 

What is it about "Rebecca" (1940) that made you think it is a whodunit? I don't see that at all.

 

Although it doesn't appear to begin as a 'whodunit', it does end as one.

 

During an argument, Rebecca fell, hit her head, and died. Maxim took the body out in a boat which he then scuttled.

 

In the ensuing police investigation, officials question whether damage to the recently discovered boat indicates that Rebecca may have committed suicide. Jack quickly provides evidence, a letter from Rebecca, that strongly suggests that she was not suicidal (he even tries to blackmail Maxim with it). Maxim comes under suspicion of murder...

 

We now have a 'whodunit' which actually begins before the start of the film.

 

That, and Alfred Hitchcock's direction, led me to choose Rebecca.

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Here's a quick one. Laurel and Hardy were under separate contracts to Hal Roach. One of them ran out before the other. While one sat out, the partner who was still under contract was put in a picture where he was teamed with another well known comic actor. Who was that other actor and what was the name of the movie? By the way, Laurel and Hardy continued their on screen partnership after this film.

 

Message was edited by: MilesArcher

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Right again, Dan. Harry Langdon had been one of the biggest stars in silent film comedy, right up there with Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd. He never really made anything of note after sound came in and today is all but forgotten. I don't think that TCM has ever aired a tribute to him. Laurel and Hardy were just coming into their own as a team when sound arrived and their voices perfectly matched their characters. They had appeared together in some earlier films, but they were not officially a team until 1927. From then on, they worked exclusively as a team with only a few exceptions until their last film, "Atoll K", or "Utopia" in the early fifties. Those exceptions being the previously mentioned "Zenobia" and "The Fighting Kentuckian" which Oliver Hardy appeared in with John Wayne around 1949. And now, as we like to say, the thread is yours.

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How about "The Others" with Nicole Kidman"?

 

Since You Went Away with Claudette Colbert ?

 

 

 

Wow. Apparently I bit off more than I could chew, with this question. There may be hundreds of films with this basic plot.

 

The film I was thinking about was "Raggedy Man" (1981), with Sissy Spacek.

 

Go ahead, Miles and p.m., and post a new question. I've got to get back to doing some serious cinema research.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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A one was posed, and two re-posted

And neither were the one requested

And so it goes, the person posing

Defers to those who offered answers

Away, away, to do researching

Cinematic information

I too defer to the other so

Mr. Archer, please, do utter

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I will do my best to utter,

Please forgive me if I stutter.

 

A few years ago, Mickey Rooney was credited with breaking Lillian Gish's record for the most years appearing in films. He started as a young child in 1926 and is still working in 2009, a span of 83 years. That is the record for years in theatrical films, however, if you count television shows, and made for TV movies, there is one other actor who still has the record. This actor also started in films as a young child in the silent movies. He did not work continually in films, but he did keep busy. He worked in vaudeville, radio, nightclubs, Las Vegas, Broadway, and television. In fact, his greatest fame came in television. For several years, he had one of the most popular shows on TV. He passed away a few years ago. His last appearance was in a made for TV movie early in this century. By my count, Mickey Rooney is still about three years away from his record. Who was this actor/comedian, and what was his first film appearance?

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That would be Milton Berle.

 

But naming his first screen appearance is a little tricky. Berle always claimed he played the newspaper boy in "Tillie's Punctured Romance" (1914), but there have always been people who said that it isn't so. Looking at "TPR" recently, I studied the newsboy's face long and hard, and find NO resemblance to Berle's features.

 

The IMDb lists two other early films -- "The Perils of Pauline" (1914) and "Fanchon, the Cricket" (1915) -- but says that his appearance in both is "unconfirmed."

 

So, it appears that the earliest confirmed film appearance by Milton Berle was in the Mary Pickford vehicle, "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" (1917).

 

Also: Have you guys heard of Johannes Heesters? A Dutchman, he has appeared in films for 84 years. He's still going strong, at age 105.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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