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Western Movie Rambles


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Paul Newman

 

I had not heard that yet...that is sad news.I know he is a very popular actor with some, though I can't say I am a huge fan myself (But he did have some very good roles that I enjoyed very much) And I admire many of his charitable endeavors as well. I know he will be missed by many.

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Well, I'm back from the Saturday program of John Wayne films. I only went for the afternoon and evening program. I missed the Friday evening program all together due to the debate.

 

The print of The Quiet Man came from the UCLA Film and TV Archive and did look quite beautiful. It was great seeing it with an appreciative audience who laughed along with the story.

 

The Scholar panel wasn't what I was expecting. Instead of having a moderated panel it was a chance for the three panelists to speak about some aspect of John Wayne for 25 minutes each Stephen Aron from the Autry Center talked about the "Wayning of the American West", Sharon Carnicke talked about Wayne's acting style and Drew Casper talked about the John Wayne persona in the post-war era. He even managed to work in Doris Day so some things never really do change after all these years.

 

As the speakers were running a bit late, we ducked out during the Q&A session to grab a bite to eat before the screening of The Searchers.

 

We did hear the first question for the panel from a writer and due to the question, it made me think that CSJ may have been the questioner but I don't know that for a fact.

 

The print of "The Searchers" was from WBros and was digitally projected. At first I thought it might be the recently restored version. If it was it has some serious problems. There are a number of negative scratches at the beginning of the movie that were evident for about 15 minutes.

In addition, there were at least three scenes that were not "timed" anywhere near correct. One scene is so red it makes you gasp out loud at how bad it looks. Especially since it cuts immediately to Ward Bond cursing Patrick Wayne (and that scene is "timed" correctly). I don't know if the digital artist fell asleep at his computer or what happened but how this digital print got released is beyond me.

 

Going back tomorrow for the entire program that includes The Cowboys, The Shootist, a reception, a panel moderated by Leonard Maltin of family and friends and a screening of Hondo in 3-D.

 

There was also a 5 minute piece done on Wayne by Batjac Productions that included Wayne's Oscar speech for True Grit, an interview clip with Merv Griffin and one with Bob Hope besides pictures of Wayne throughout his career.

 

Gas to get to USC $40

Parking on campus $ 8

Seeing Rick Jewell after all these years: Priceless

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> Sounds like overall this was a lot of fun. Hope today's events went well....my level of envy has yet to dissipate. Sometimes green is such an ugly color for me too...oh well

 

Yes, I can't even begin to imagine watching the Duke in 3-D :P

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_Lynne_, thanks *so much* for the rundown of Saturday's events. I'm hoping that quiet

man print was a restored one that will soon make it to DVD. I can't wait to hear about

yesterday---I'm betting it had to be even better.

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My friends went to see *Appaloosa* without me (they went to a midnight showing they knew I

wouldn't be up for). It's pretty good and Viggo is supposedly a stand-out. I'm still not sure if

I will see it in theaters, but I will get to it eventually.

 

Much more satisfyingly, I watched *3 Bad Men* again, and when I wasn't laughing or

crying I noticed how even more strongly the movie resembles The Man Who Shot Liberty

Valance.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> _Lynne_, thanks *so much* for the rundown of Saturday's events. I'm hoping that quiet

> man print was a restored one that will soon make it to DVD. I can't wait to hear about

> yesterday---I'm betting it had to be even better.

 

I'm also glad Lynn and CSJ were able to keep us updated on the Wayne weekend. And I'm sure all fans of *The Quiet Man* will be much relieved once a restored version of the movie finds its way to DVD -- and hopefully, Blu-Ray as well! B-)

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Don't forget TCM will be showing *Fort Massacre* early Tuesday morning (5am Eastern) as part of the Walter Mirisch tribute/ "Private Screenings" premiere.

 

*Fort Massacre* (1958)

A possibly mad cavalry commander leads his troops through dangerous Indian territory.

Cast: Joel McCrea, Forrest Tucker, Susan Cabot. Dir: Joseph M. Newman. C-81 mins, TV-PG

 

Gaff2143807471.jpg

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I enjoyed the Sunday program very much. The print of *The Cowboys* was in pretty good shape though there were a few faded scenes.

 

Rick Jewell introduced the film by telling the story of Wayne and Dern talking about their last scene together in the film. Wayne told Dern "You know, you will be villified." and Dern replied "Yeah, but they'll love me in Berkeley."

 

*The Shootist* was in very good shape.

 

The panel on Friends and Family moderated by Leonard Maltin was very entertaining with Gretchen Wayne, director Mark Rydell (*The Cowboys*), Stephanie Powers and Lee Meriwether as well as the son of the author of "The Shootist* who was also the co-screenwriter. Lee Meriwether told a cute story about a party on the set of *The Undefeated* that ended with Hudson and Wayne drunkingly walking together back to the hotel where the cast was staying.

 

Rydell told a funny one about Wayne jumping the gun on his cue and beginning the farewell scene where the cattle drive begins before Rydell said "Action". He screamed at Wayne in front of the cast and crew. At the end of the day he returned to the production office certain that there would be hell to pay. There were three phone calls from Wayne waiting for him. "I thought for sure that I was going to be fired and Andrew McLaglen would be directing the movie in the morning" he told us. Instead, he and Wayne went to dinner and patched up their relationship.

 

The print of *Hondo* was great and I really enjoyed the digital 3-D presentation that Dolby Labs sponsored.

 

I've never experienced 3-D like that before. I know that CSJ has some qualms with print but I really enjoyed it. I haven't seen 3-D in many, many years and this was definitely a big leap forward in the technology from the old days.

 

I saw some old classmates and friends that I hadn't seen in many years. Got to meet CSJ and as well as the collector who supplied a great deal of the props and artifacts to the exhibit in the David Wolper Center in Doheny Library. That exhibit runs until the end of the year.

 

I talked to my friend who was in charge of the theater for the weekend and learned that the print provided for *The Searchers* was a 35 mm print but that a DVD had been provided for the showing of the clips that Sharon Carnicke used. So, that clears up that debate. The print WBros sent had emulsion scratches for about 15 mins at the top of the film and three badly faded scenes in the body of the film.

 

One of these days I would like to see the digital restoration from last year.

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> One of these days I would like to see the digital restoration from last year.

 

Which digital restoration? Do you refer to the restoration that was done (at least in part) for the DVD/BR release? I take it you mean you'd like to see a film print of the restoration, shown in 35mm?

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*Which digital restoration? Do you refer to the restoration that was done (at least in part) for the DVD/BR release?*

 

Yes, that one. CSJ posted about it after he saw a screening of it at the Academy and said it had some problems as well. That's why I would like to see it before buying the DVD/BR release.

 

 

*I take it you mean you'd like to see a film print of the restoration, shown in 35mm?*

 

Very much so.

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> *Which digital restoration? Do you refer to the restoration that was done (at least in part) for the DVD/BR release?*

>

> Yes, that one. CSJ posted about it after he saw a screening of it at the Academy and said it had some problems as well. That's why I would like to see it before buying the DVD/BR release.

>

>

> *I take it you mean you'd like to see a film print of the restoration, shown in 35mm?*

>

> Very much so.

 

I believe some of the problems he mentioned were day-for-night scenes that weren't presented properly (to make them look like night scenes); I am under the impression this seems to be happening a lot lately with a lot of classic movies.

 

At any rate, I'm with you that we should hope the movie will eventually be presented on home video the way it should be. It's just too great a classic to give it such shoddy treatment.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> This review of the new Blu-Ray release of THE COWBOYS is so good it's made me

> want to see it again. I have avoided any repeat viewing for obvious reasons to those

> who have seen it. Kathy, have you seen it?

>

> http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/movies.php?id=436&show=review

 

Good classic westerns in Blu-Ray are few and rare between, I'll be checking this out too, hopefully

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MissG,

 

I saw *The Cowboys* on the big screen over the weekend. It holds up remarkably well over all these years. It's great to see some of the young'uns like Robert Carradine and A Martinez who went on to have careers.

 

Also, revisiting the film and realizing how wonderful Roscoe Lee Browne always was and how terrific Colleen Dewhurst could be with just a cameo of sorts are two more reasons to re-visit the film.

 

The score by John Williams does not hold up as well as the movie but many of the scores from back then don't.

 

The climatic scene still carries a punch though not as hard as upon the initial viewing.

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Here's a very interesting article about author _Dorothy M. Johnson_, who wrote the original

stories upon which the movies The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The Hanging Tree and

A Man Called Horse were based. It talks about her experiences with Hollywood and there

are a couple of amusing quotes about Wayne and fellow Montanan, Gary Cooper.

 

http://tinyurl.com/4fawaz

 

the author with an admirer

 

DorothyJohnsonCoop.jpg

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Here's a very interesting article about author _Dorothy M. Johnson_, who wrote the original

> stories upon which the movies The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The Hanging Tree and

> A Man Called Horse were based. It talks about her experiences with Hollywood and there

> are a couple of amusing quotes about Wayne and fellow Montanan, Gary Cooper.

>

> http://tinyurl.com/4fawaz

>

Thank you for that link, Miss G!

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April...I have too many projects going on this evening...but will read that article later for sure..it looks like an intersting piece. (and that author looks more like someone who would be more likely to be found writing cookbooks than western drama....guess you really can't judge a book by it's cover.) :-)

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}....guess you really can't judge a book by it's cover.) :-)

 

Ha!

 

I hope you do get to read it, it's really quite interesting and funny. The most interesting parts,

to me, were how Miss Johnson said she got her ideas and also her refreshing modesty and

candor (she believes Hollywood, in the case of Liberty V and The Hanging Tree, actually

improved upon her original works).

 

I ordered a collection of her stories that includes her three major works adapted to the

screen. I'm very curious to see how they compare.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

>

> I hope you do get to read it, it's really quite interesting and funny. The most interesting parts,

> to me, were how Miss Johnson said she got her ideas and also her refreshing modesty and

> candor (she believes Hollywood, in the case of Liberty V and The Hanging Tree, actually

> improved upon her original works).

>

 

Shows a great deal of modesty on her part, imho. All the more reason to admire her

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very interesting article about author Dorothy M. Johnson

 

Thanks so much for posting that article. It was worth staying up a little late for!

 

I think she sounds like she would have been a lot of fun to have as an old aunt or and elderly next door neighbor. I bet she could tell some really fun stories.

 

The way she wrote sounds very similar to a teacher I had years ago in a creative writing class. And she always told us to start with a "what if..." and expand from there. It is fun to sit down and pencil scratch like that from time to time. Though I confess I would never consider any of my meager attempts to match the weight of Ms. Johnson's stories. I still am having a hard time picturing her writing such heavy subject matter. But it goes back to what I said earlier about not judging on looks. (I think I also remember saying that most people who know me would not guess that I am a Western fan. I think that this genre is something that just fits some people more than others.)

 

I haven't seen The Hanging Tree, but it is on my list for sure. And the "Horse" movie I have only seen in bits and pieces over the years. But the characters of TMWSLV have been the topic of some very deep and thought provoking discussion on here....and from her appearant humble nature, I doubt Ms. Johnson would have ever expected that. I wonder if the "This is the West..." line was her's or if it came from the Hollywood rewrite. Because she certainly seemed to have a grasp on the whole concept of Western Myth.

 

Let me know what you think of the stories when you get them. I'd be interested in how they compare as well.

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> very interesting article about author Dorothy M. Johnson

>

> Thanks so much for posting that article. It was worth staying up a little late for!

>

 

You're most welcome!

 

 

> I think she sounds like she would have been a lot of fun to have as an old aunt or and elderly next door neighbor. I bet she could tell some really fun stories.

>

 

I would love to know someone like that. I just adore listening to a good yarn spinner. It's a

lost art.

 

 

> The way she wrote sounds very similar to a teacher I had years ago in a creative writing class. And she always told us to start with a "what if..." and expand from there. It is fun to sit down and pencil scratch like that from time to time. Though I confess I would never consider any of my meager attempts to match the weight of Ms. Johnson's stories. I still am having a hard time picturing her writing such heavy subject matter. But it goes back to what I said earlier about not judging on looks. (I think I also remember saying that most people who know me would not guess that I am a Western fan. I think that this genre is something that just fits some people more than others.)

>

 

She gave me some food for thought with regard to my own writing attempts.

 

Almost no one would think I was a western fan, either. The few people around me that have even seen a western are all male.

 

 

 

> I haven't seen The Hanging Tree, but it is on my list for sure. And the "Horse" movie I have only seen in bits and pieces over the years. But the characters of TMWSLV have been the topic of some very deep and thought provoking discussion on here....and from her appearant humble nature, I doubt Ms. Johnson would have ever expected that. I wonder if the "This is the West..." line was her's or if it came from the Hollywood rewrite. Because she certainly seemed to have a grasp on the whole concept of Western Myth.

>

 

I'm curious, too. When I read Alan Lemay's book, The Searchers, I didn't expect it to be

like the movie at all. Turns out, Ford and his screenwriter (Nugent, I think?) followed the

book remarkably closely!

 

It's a continued sore spot with me that The Hanging Tree is not available on DVD or gets

aired on television. It's just too good not to be! People might be surprised to see all the

darkness in Gary's character of "Doc Frail" and knowing how much people, critics especially,

love the "dark" they would doubtless find much to praise in his performance.

 

 

> Let me know what you think of the stories when you get them. I'd be interested in how they compare as well.

 

I will indeed. :)

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> It's a continued sore spot with me that The Hanging Tree is not available on DVD or gets

> aired on television. It's just too good not to be! People might be surprised to see all the

> darkness in Gary's character of "Doc Frail" and knowing how much people, critics especially,

> love the "dark" they would doubtless find much to praise in his performance.

 

You probably already knew this, being a Coop fan and all, but *The Hanging Tree* is available on an R2 DVD from France, where it's called *La Colline des potences*. It sells for ?15 on amazon.fr. I think you'd expressed concerns at some point about PAL speedup, but for many other folks it might be better than nothing at all.

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