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Western Movie Rambles


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*The other ones you mentioned I think are going to be headed for my list. I haven't read all the info on them yet, but so far they look like ones I would want to see. I knew I could trust you (and all the other folks on here) to come up w/ some good titles for me.* :-)

 

Hey, that's what we're here for! ;)

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A reminder for Western fans: next Tuesday, Oct. 21st at noon ET:

 

*Rio Grande* (1950)

A cavalry unit located on the Mexican border must control Indian uprisings.

Cast: John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, Ben Johnson. Dir: John Ford. BW-105 mins, TV-PG

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It's been a while since I last got to see it. This is one I should probably put on my "Wanna Own" list....Oh no....another list....I am having too much trouble keeping up w/ all this listing. (You'd think w/ all these lists going on I'd be a really organized person...sadly...not true. In fact...I don't usually make lists that have a "to do" aspect about them....because they always seem to just lie around unheeded on a (cluttered) table somewhere....mocking me from a distance. :-)

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Speaking of lists.....anybody got anything to say about Springfield Rifle? I was watching our Sgt York DVD this afternoon and I took a look at some of the special features and there was a trailer on there for Springfield Rifle. This is a "Gary" that I haven't seen as far as I can recall and I don't remember seeing any "chat" on here about it....just wondering if it is a "list worthy" addition or not.

 

Anyone care to comment?????????

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"Springfield Rifle" has shown up on the Westerns Channel from time to time. It's been a while since I've seen it but I remember it being ok. Nothing to get real excited over but if you're looking for something new to see from Gary it will do.

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Well...from what the two of you are saying it may just be one I will watch if I see it is coming on, but probably won't go out looking for it. (Now I know there may be some of the "Gary" folks who might have a stronger opinion though) :-) From the looks of the trailer, it did not seem to be as strong of a storyline as I might have expected from a Coop western. But you can't always tell from that.

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If you really like Coop you'll enjoy Springfield Rifle but if he's not a favorite it's mildly entertaining.

Dallas, which Encore Westerns airs sometimes, too, is the better of the two. But if you don't

get that network it's pretty much only available on DVD.

 

I don't think I incuded a movie for your list that is a big favorite of mine and I believe is right

up your alley, Kathy, if you haven't seen it: *The Proud Rebel* with Alan Ladd and Olivia

de Havilland (directed by Michael Curtiz). This is one you can watch with the whole family,

as your daughter may enjoy the many scenes with Alan Ladd's young son, David, and their

clever dog, Lance. It's one of the most underrated, nearly forgotten westerns ever, in my opinion.

The photography is about what you would expect from a Michael Curtiz movie, nothing short

of brilliant, emotional and beautifully thoughtful. It's a much better looking picture than even

Shane, though the story is not quite as strong (yet more kid-friendly). It never shows up on

cable to my knowledge, but you might be able to pick it up cheaply on DVD. Ladd plays the

man of the title, suffering the prejudice of being one of the losing side from the Civil War, who

tries to find a doctor to cure his little boy's muteness, brought on by trauma. They are given

temporary home and work by Olivia de Havilland, a small scale farmer trying to keep her land

in sheep country. Excellent performances by all (including the dog) and David Ladd is especially

touching.

 

proudrebel2.jpg

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Hi April...thanks for the comments on the Coop films. I am not a diehard Gary gal, but I do like his films very much. Dallas made it onto my list after reading the comments last week, but I may hold off on Springfield Rifle and just keep it in mind if I happen across it.

 

The Proud Rebel definitely sounds like it is right up my alley. I will certainly be adding it on to my list. I haven't seen as many DeHavilland's as some (but I loved her in GWTW and The Heiress) I don't think I've ever seen her in a role like this. I imagine she does very well. (Ladd is sure to be good too) I'm already liking it just from the picture you posted. (And Hannah would love the dog I am sure.) :-) Thanks for the tip!

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This "ramble" just occurred to me. I was thinking about why I tend to prefer *Man of the West*

over *High Noon* as (in my opinion) the best Gary Cooper western. (The Hanging Tree is by a hair

my favorite Gary western, but I wouldn't say it was as all around well crafted; it's a bit uneven

and ending is too abrupt in my opinion, and I don't think it ranks as one of the best westerns

of all time).

 

Both *Man of the West* and *High Noon* show Cooper portraying what I think he does best,

which is confronting insurmountable odds alone and coping with a sudden betrayal or loss

of support. He's not really the "lone wolf" type in my opinion, I believe him as a community

or family man, so he is ideal in these two scenarios where he's suddenly confronted with

a dangerous past that may destroy a happy present and possible future he's finally acquired.

What gives *Man of the West* the edge in my opinion, is that I feel he has more to lose and

more at stake. Will Kane is an established pillar of the community with a respectable standing

and respected reputation. Whether Amy, his bride, leaves him permanently or not, he's not really

going to be on his own, ever. He'll always be welcome and respected. But not Link Jones.

He really did have an evil past that could completely obliterate what appears a rather tenuous,

new stability in a place that has put their trust in him, almost as if "on probation." I get the

impression his mission to get a school teacher is almost like a test, and if he doesn't come

back with the right results his life will crumble. His family isn't made to feel very real, either,

which contributes to the sense of insecurity of his situation. That, and the way he expresses so

much desperation over the loss of the money (the trust). I think the "man alone" theme is much

stronger and more desperate in Man of the West than in High Noon. And his character more

complex and that's why I prefer it. I do believe, however, much good argument can be made that

*High Noon* is the better film.

 

Any other thoughts? I know Angie (Coopsgirl) adores *High Noon* so she probably won't agree

with me. I just never really took th etime to figure out why I am so partial to *MotW* over the

much more lauded (justly) *High Noon*. I think it's because I'm always going to be more drawn to

the character who has been dealt the lousier hand.

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The two leads you refer to are different types of loners. Will Kane is forced to become one. Some think Kane is afraid. I think only in the sense that time and age may have slowed him to where he thinks he can't compete against the three. I almost expect his to say "If I were ten years younger... The proof of his duty is that he came back. He knew they would come after him, retired or not. No one blames him for leaving. Doesn't Lon Chaney mention that if Kane left than the town might be spared anything? Saving them the trouble and maybe the guilt of what could happen. "High Noon" is a great story and well done. My only problem is Kelly. She is lovely but I wish they would have used someone older.

 

"Man Of The West" didn't strike me as forcefully as it did you. It's been a little while since I've seen it but I'll have to look at it again to give you a really good discussion. From what I remember you bring out several good points about his desire to keep clean. But when the bad guy mentality is needed it can come in handy.

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Possilbe SPOILERs

 

Re: Man of the West vs. High Noon

 

That's it exactly, Chris, Will Kane is forced to become a loner whereas Link has always been

outside of respectable society until fairly recently. As for my preference it's more a preference

for the character than the movie. I think High Noon may very well be a much finer film all around.

Subjectively, I just feel more drawn to Link because, as I said, he's liable to get nailed on all

sides whereas Will can kind of express that righteous indignation toward the townspeople who

let HIM down.

 

High Noon also is a more emotionally satisfying movie to me in that it ends the way I think

it should end and Gary's character gets to express what we all feel, too. But Man of the West

ends rather unsatisfyingly, ambivalently and we are not given what we want. I'm still as worried

about Link in the fade-out as I was 15 minutes prior. For some reason, this paradoxically makes

me more attached to his character than to Will's. I know Will will be alright and he's got his

Quaker to keep him together.

 

Message was edited by: MissGoddess

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*"Man Of The West" didn't strike me as forcefully as it did you. It's been a little while since I've seen it but I'll have to look at it again to give you a really good discussion. From what I remember you bring out several good points about his desire to keep clean. But when the bad guy mentality is needed it can come in handy.*

 

I have only seen *Man of the West* once, and never did it strike me as a film having the kind of reputation that *High Noon* does. I'm not saying we should gauge films or the level of quality based exclusively on the "vox pop" or AFI lists or any such criteria. However, based entirely on the fact that *High Noon* has always been a memorable movie for me, I'm inclined to think I'll always be biased in favour of it. (I think the b&W photography and tight running time are part of what work in making the movie a memorable one for me). On the other hand, *Man of the West* is in widescreen, which at least when presented on old-fashioned TV screens, tends to make me feel more distant from the characters. I know this is just temporary, and (like all other widescreen movies), *Man of the West* will probably feel a lot more alive when seen in an HD format. For me, that may go a long way towards appreciating it a lot more than I did the first time.

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Howdy, Woman of the West -- Both Man of the West and High Noon show Cooper portraying what I think he does best, which is confronting insurmountable odds alone and coping with a sudden betrayal or loss of support.

 

Very true, and well put.

 

He's not really the "lone wolf" type in my opinion, I believe him as a community

or family man, so he is ideal in these two scenarios where he's suddenly confronted with

a dangerous past that may destroy a happy present and possible future he's finally acquired.

 

I once again agree. I don't see Coop as a "lone wolf."

 

What gives Man of the West the edge in my opinion, is that I feel he has more to lose and

more at stake. Will Kane is an established pillar of the community with a respectable standing

and respected reputation. Whether Amy, his bride, leaves him permanently or not, he's not really

going to be on his own, ever. He'll always be welcome and respected. But not Link Jones. He really did have an evil past that could completely obliterate what appears a rather tenuous,

new stability in a place that has put their trust in him, almost as if "on probation." I get the

impression his mission to get a school teacher is almost like a test, and if he doesn't come

back with the right results his life will crumble. His family isn't made to feel very real, either,

which contributes to the sense of insecurity of his situation. That, and the way he expresses so

much desperation over the loss of the money (the trust). I think the "man alone" theme is much

stronger and more desperate in Man of the West than in High Noon. And his character more

complex and that's why I prefer it.

 

This is not going well at all. Not at all. You are exactly correct. "Will Kane" is a trusted law man while "Link Jones" is a reformed criminal. And, you are dead on, Link's entire future is riding on him being able to deliver the money. Anything short of that and nobody in the community that gave him a second chance will trust him with anything of importance ever again. He will feel as if he's less than a man in such a community.

 

I just never really took th etime to figure out why I am so partial to MotW over the

much more lauded (justly) High Noon. I think it's because I'm always going to be more drawn to

the character who has been dealt the lousier hand.

 

Link was definitely dealt a lousy hand. He didn't have a true family and this led him to his youthful demise. He eventually made an adult decision, abandoning his "family" in an effort to become a man. In High Noon, it's the opposite. Just about everyone abandons Will.

 

I know Will will be alright and he's got his Quaker to keep him together.

 

That's right!

 

There's just too much agreein' goin' on rounds heres.

 

manofthewest1.jpg

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Oh, this is scary! Why do I think any minute you're going to say "trick or treat" or

"April Fools!" :P

 

MotW01.jpg?t=1224894055

 

MotW02.jpg?t=1224894094

 

MotW03.jpg?t=1224894130

 

MotW04.jpg?t=1224894162

 

What I just noticed about this moment in the scene was Gary's hands as he stood there

looking at Dock Tobin's shack. He kept motioning and gripping his hands as though he

was wearing his guns (he doesn't have a gunbelt on). I never caught these slight gestures before.

MotW05.jpg?t=1224894193

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*What I just noticed about this moment in the scene was Gary's hands as he stood there*

*looking at Dock Tobin's shack. He kept motioning and gripping his hands as though he*

*was wearing his guns (he doesn't have a gunbelt on). I never caught these slight gestures before.*

 

Good catch. I don't think I would normally notice that unless someone else pointed it out.

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Oh, this is scary!

 

It's Halloween time. :P

 

Why do I think any minute you're going to say "trick or treat" or "April Fools!" :P

 

That's because you are full of cruel tricks and I'm always bringing you the sweetest

of treats. As for the latter, well...

 

What I just noticed about this moment in the scene was Gary's hands as he

stood there looking at Dock Tobin's shack. He kept motioning and gripping his

hands as though he was wearing his guns (he doesn't have a gunbelt on). I never

caught these slight gestures before.

 

You didn't?! I always notice that. It's quite obvious. :P Then again...

 

I didn't notice that. Somebody is sharp for a Blondle. Nice catch, Miss Gun for Hire.

 

The caps you posted are extremely important ones. Nicely done.

 

manofthewest2.jpg

 

manofthewest3.jpg

 

manofthewest4.jpg

 

manofthewest5.jpg

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