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Western Movie Rambles


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The dark side is the good side!

 

Says who, Liberty Valance?!

 

I thought in Texas that meant you were engaged.

 

....you tell your friends a little story about a cute guy and they think you're getting married! OY VEY!!

 

I wish i could find my parents copy of Top Secret! so I could make some screencaps to "kick your fanny". Heehee!

 

Too bad!

 

Oh, I'll find it!

 

The book is better! Way better! Once again, Ford ruins a film. Dances? Weddings? Pride and Prejudice!

 

Ford didn't direct Pride and Prejudice, silly-pants! and it's a good movie and book with the best ending even possible!

 

That killed me! All he needs to know is she's a peach... with horrific taste in classic movies.

 

He didn't think so.... :D Why am I a peach? And who says YOU aren't the one with the horrific taste in classic movies?

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Shiftless,

 

I never said Ethan's redemption comes easy but it does come. Unfortunately, it comes too late and he is left to wander between the two worlds, his and the civilized world mirrored by the Jorgensens, much like the Comanche whose eyes he shot out.

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Howdy, Lynn -- I never said Ethan's redemption comes easy but it does come.

 

This is very true. Kicking and screaming!

 

Unfortunately, it comes too late and he is left to wander between the two worlds, his and the civilized world mirrored by the Jorgensens, much like the Comanche whose eyes he shot out.

 

Ooooooooooooh, I like that one! Very nice!

 

Howdy, Mrs. Horrible Tastes -- you tell your friends a little story about a cute guy and they think you're getting married! OY VEY!!

 

You're the one who loves weddings, Eliza!

 

Ford didn't direct Pride and Prejudice, silly-pants! and it's a good movie and book with the best ending even possible!

 

Yes he did! The snobby Colonel Darcy!

 

He didn't think so.... Why am I a peach? And who says YOU aren't the one with the horrific taste in classic movies?

 

He'll need a boatload of film noir after he watches one Greer Garson movie with you! :P

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I take back my kind words of appreciation.

>

> Just like a duchess, Duchess

 

On your way home don't forget to pick up my favorite cousin Jim.

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Oh, darn! I should never have suggested The Snows of Kilimanjaro except to bury you in.

 

:P I'm sure you'll find a way!

 

I was thinking this over a couple days ago: Hitchcock seemed to focus on the innocent man who is wrongly accused. Ford seemed to focus on how Society accused (judged) others.

 

Pilgrimage (Hannah sits in judgment)

 

Doctor Bull (Society forms a board to judge Doc)

 

Judge Priest (Bob is placed on trial for who he is, mostly)

 

Steamboat Round the Bend (Society's scorned - a shyster, a swamp girl, a drunkard, and a black man - look to free an imprisoned man)

 

Mary of Scotland (Mary is overthrown by "Society")

 

Stagecoach (Doc and Dallas are tossed out of town by Society, not to mention, The Ringo Kid)

 

Young Mr. Lincoln (Yet another trial of a wrongly accused/innocent man)

 

The Grapes of Wrath (Society is forcing the poor out)

 

How Green Was My Valley (The Clergy harshly judges their congregation)

 

Fort Apache (Colonel Thursday demands a "civilized" outpost and he sits in judgment of the Apache)

 

Wagon Master (The Mormons are forced out of town by Society)

 

Mogambo (Honey Bear is judged by her "past")

 

Donovan's Reef (Society judgment, throughout)

 

7 Women (Religious judgment)

 

I know you can speak of more, but those were the ones that came to mind for me. There are even more personal judgments involved, ala Pilgrimage, such as Doniphon and Ranse judging each other or Marlowe's (John Wayne) judgment of Hank (William Holden) and Hannah's judgment of "Yankees" in The Horse Soldiers.

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Wow, oh I will have to think about all of that, Mr Hatfield. You've given me a lot to ponder. I will reply to you more fully (I know! Too bad! :P )

 

I will say it almost sounds like Ford really had a grudge against how society/establishment comes down on who it selectively chooses to come down on. Maybe it stems from his experiences as part of an Irish family living in the very socially stratified Maine. It was "them" against "us" sort of environment. Orson Welles once said "(Ford) wore chips on his shoulders like they were epaulettes."

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I will say it almost sounds like Ford really had a grudge against how society/establishment comes down on who it selectively chooses to come down on.

 

Right. "Grudge" is a pretty good word for it. Who made them the "chosen ones"?

 

Maybe it stems from his experiences as part of an Irish family living in the very socially stratified Maine. It was "them" against "us" sort of environment.

 

It could be. He's definitely a rebel and maybe you can find some Catholic guilt involved with him, too. Most great directors are rebels.

 

Orson Welles once said "(Ford) wore chips on his shoulders like they were epaulettes."

 

That's hilarious!

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

 

> I will say it almost sounds like Ford really had a grudge against how society/establishment comes down on who it selectively chooses to come down on. Maybe it stems from his experiences as part of an Irish family living in the very socially stratified Maine. It was "them" against "us" sort of environment. Orson Welles once said "(Ford) wore chips on his shoulders like they were epaulettes."

 

 

Wow, what a great quote!

 

Layne Hatfield,

 

In *Wagon Master*, the Mormons, after having been ushered out of Crystal City, also turn right around and judge the medicine show folks.....if it had been up to Russell Simpson and the rest, they would have been sent off into the wilderness with a mule or two. If it weren't for Ward Bond and Ben, the group would most surely have died. That's what I love about Ford, his willingness to make judgmental behavior an across the board, very human failing. We all are guilty of it at some point or another, and have to fight against it. His Mormons aren't all perfect examples of upright saintliness. They have to work at it.

 

>*Most great directors are rebels.*

 

 

?????? Did I read you right?

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Mar 3, 2010 1:18 PM

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>

> It could be. He's definitely a rebel and maybe you can find some Catholic guilt involved with him, too. Most great directors are rebels.

>

 

They are! Hitch had a kind of grudge against the police for what he went through when his father let him sit in jail as a kid, didn't he? A Catholic, too...

 

Jackie---glad you brought up Wagon Master because that film popped into my head, too!

 

I really feel this aspect of things very strongly in Stagecoach. Everyone on that coach except Curly (George Bancroft) and Buck (Andy Devine), the drivers, and Mrs Mallory are societal outcasts (judged), and complex ones, too. Gatewood and Hatfield were apparently once a part of the most rigid facets of the established order and yet, here they are....

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Mar 3, 2010 1:25 PM

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Howdy, Ford Floozy -- You know I sit in judgment of you and your awful judgments in taste! :P

 

In Wagon Master, the Mormons, after having been ushered out of Crystal City, also turn right around and judge the medicine show folks.....if it had been up to Russell Simpson and the rest, they would have been sent off into the wilderness with a mule or two. If it weren't for Ward Bond and Ben, the group would most surely have died.

 

I pretty much agree with you. Where my only disagreement is that I'm not sure it was the entire lot of Mormons who sat in judgment but Elder Wiggs (Ward Bond). I think Elder Perkins (Russell Simpsons) represented the disapproving, strict Clergy that you see in How Green Was My Valley and Wiggy is similar to Gruffydd (Walter Pidgeon). If the two could voice their views in front of the Mormons, I don't think it would have been all one way. But your overall point is an excellent one. One moment you are being judged, the next it's you who is judging. You'd think we'd come to understand how it feels to be judged... but we don't.

 

That's what I love about Ford, his willingness to make judgmental behavior an across the board, very human failing. We all are guilty of it at some point or another, and have to fight against it. His Mormons aren't all perfect examples of upright saintliness. They have to work at it.

 

Nicely said. We're back to agreeing. You need another bath, Denver.

 

Most great directors are rebels.?????? Did I read you right?

 

No! You have to put on your special glasses to read my true words. :P

 

So when can we judge the girls' bikini contest? :P:P It's not about who wins or loses!

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I was thinking this over a couple days ago: Hitchcock seemed to focus on the innocent man who is wrongly accused. Ford seemed to focus on how Society accused (judged) others.

 

Now that's interesting that you came across that conclusion about Ford and Hitch movies, Dutch Boy! I think I realized the judgment aspect, but never put it together in all of his movies that I have actually seen.

 

Mary of Scotland was definitely a strong suitor for the accusation of what society wants to see rather than accepts her as the strong woman that she was. It gets me so angry every time it comes on, because it was never her fault!

 

In which parts of Donovan's Reef are you speaking of those terms?

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>*Most great directors are rebels.*?????? Did I read you right?

 

>*No! You have to put on your special glasses to read my true words. :P*

 

<*So when can we judge the girls' bikini contest? :P:P It's not about who wins or loses!*

 

Don't try to distract us with bikini contests! Are you saying Ford is a great director? :P

 

I like that comparison of Grufuyd with Elder Wiggs...and the church goers and Elder Perkins. very nice! If you call Elder Wiggs Wiggy, can I call Elder Perkins Perky?

 

 

I think you need a bath... get your mind off the bikinis, Layne.

 

Photobucket

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Howdy, Mrs. Dimples -- Mary of Scotland was definitely a strong suitor for the accusation of what society wants to see rather than accepts her as the strong woman that she was. It gets me so angry every time it comes on, because it was never her fault!

 

You and your "strong women"! I want me a weak woman!

 

In which parts of Donovan's Reef are you speaking of those terms?

 

The entire film! While the film is a light comedy, its message is very heavy. You've got judgments against what is "morally right" all over the place. A man leaves his wife and daughter, marries a younger "native" girl and has children with her. You also have the religious judging in the film and the call for acceptance of different cultures. Then there's Donovan and Ameilia and their judgments of the other.

 

donovansreef2-1.jpg

 

donovansreef3-1.jpg

 

donovansreef4-1.jpg

 

donovansreef5-1.jpg

 

Do you see who Ford considers the "Holier than Thous" of society to be?:

 

donovansreef1-1.jpg

 

stagecoach3-1.jpg

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