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Western Movie Rambles


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OH my gosh, my golly..... I just finished watching My Darling Clementine. (sigh) I am so glad to get a chance to see it again.. AND this time I got it on TAPE, too (yippee!)

 

But, oh, MISS G!!!! Did you catch what our dear, beloved Mr. Osborne said tonight AFTER the movie, about my dear sweet, Walter and our kind, beloved PAPPY??????????? ha.

 

Ford: "Don't you even know how to mount a horse?"

Walter: "No, but I have got three Oscars for acting!"

 

Oh my goodness.... just imagine the jaws dropping around the movie set THAT day. ha. :D

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Mar 18, 2010 9:57 PM

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> OH my gosh, my golly..... I just finished watching My Darling Clementine. (sigh) I am so glad to get a chance to see it again.. AND this time I got it on TAPE, too (yippee!)

>

 

I came home in time just to see the end. I'm so glad you got it taped! If you ever do want to rent the dvd, I still recommend it because the commentary by Scott Eyman is really fascinating.

 

 

> But, oh, MISS G!!!! Did you catch what our dear, beloved Mr. Osborne said tonight AFTER the movie, about my dear sweet, Walter and our kind, beloved PAPPY??????????? ha.

>

> Ford: "Don't you even know how to mount a horse?"

> Walter: "No, but I have got three Oscars for acting!"

>

> Oh my goodness.... just imagine the jaws dropping around the movie set THAT day. ha. :D

>

 

:D "Kind and beloved Pappy"?? Well, kind when no one could catch him at it and certainly beloved but also an ornery Irishman with a tongue like a whiplash, ha! I'd read before that they did butt heads, which doesn't surprise me. I don't think Mr. Brennan was one to put up with Ford's cantankerousness.

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Oh, dear, I just saw that I haven't replied to you here! Nothing personal! :D

 

> You said it exactly right. Jimmie (Gregory Peck) could have chosen to do what Tommy did, but he didn't. But he knows it's not too late, so now he has a new purpose in life. It is too little, too late?

>

 

That's the question...I think it is never "too late" but he pushed things by staying too long in that little town. Had he been able to get away as planned and started fresh somewhere where they never heard of him, it might have been different. Boy how times have changed; now you can't run and hide what you've done so easy. Ask Tiger.

 

> That was nicely said. Yes, I believe Jimmie wanted his son (B.G. Norman) to respect men like Mark (Millard Mitchell). But I also believe he was telling the truth. He had that much respect for his friend.

>

 

Certainly, Mark was clearly the better man, the man Jimmy could have been but chose not to be.

 

> Okay...so that little squirt was a serial back-shooter. Ugh! Gross! He makes Liberty Valance seem like a hero.

>

> He's Tom Doniphon! :P

>

 

Now I see why I didn't reply to you.

 

> I'd say Mark is the everyday man who doesn't get the love and respect that the famous or infamous get. He's not the "pretty one," he's the regular guy; the unsung. This reminds me of our discussion about Ben Wade and Shane being one kind of man and Dan Evans and Joe Starrett being another.

>

 

Excellent comparisons (in this case). Except...he's way tougher than either of those men. I mean, a marshall that can stand down killers unarmed is pretty fierce. I don't say he's better than the others, just probably a lot tougher.

 

 

>

> I do have that one on tape, so I can watch it. I'm a Glenn Ford fan.

 

Did you?

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> :D "Kind and beloved Pappy"?? Well, kind when no one could catch him at it and certainly beloved but also an ornery Irishman with a tongue like a whiplash, ha! I'd read before that they did butt heads, which doesn't surprise me. I don't think Mr. Brennan was one to put up with Ford's cantankerousness.

 

 

Ha... well.. as for the "kind, beloved" comment.. let me get my tongue out of my cheek before I go on.. HA!!!! (and PS.. despite his "irrascible ways" I bet Ford was beloved by those who knew him best.. even some of the ones who got that whiplash tongue aimed at them most. ha.

 

But OH I imagine you are right... I doubt my dear sweet Walter was among them.. ha. Looks like he did not take his tongelashing sitting still. ha. (and PS, I don't know at all what he was like in real life.. but he had "cantankerous" down pat in a lot of his roles, especially later on.. I wonder if he modeled any of them after Pappy??) HA!! :-)

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I watched *My Darling Clementine* almost through to the end - but then fell asleep as the OK Corral shootout started!!!!! Of all the sections to fall asleep .....sheesh. Luckily I have recorded.

 

What I noticed about the movie:

 

Ford's use of rhythm in the film is outstanding. He uses it to great effect creating the quiet, still, wide open spaces and the crazy loud wide open town. I've never seen such a contrast between two places before... Ford was brilliant in the way he makes that town seem like a free for all, just by sound and light.... it also points up how long the Earps have been on their own in the desert... the town is so amplified to them, because they have not seen people for so long.

 

Ford also uses rhythm to create tension -

 

The Clantons first entrance is subtle, and the way Ford lingers on Pa's face too long makes us uncomfortable with them right from the start. The film is filled with talk that is too slow, responses that are pulled out and stretched - things are just wrong here in Tombstone. We KNOW the Clantons are bad'uns from the minute they appear, but it is easy to see why the Earps don't realize it. The same goes for Doc.... something is wrong, and his stillness is a sign of impending danger.

 

The opposite use of rhythm in the barbershop scene, which was incredible! I didn't remember it at all, I don't know why, it is easily the best scene in the whole picture! A bullet whizzes out of nowhere smashing a cup of shaving cream and water with no warning at all. As the Earps walk around, bullets strike willy nilly, unexpectedly shattering things in their path...behind them.....amazingly no one is hit. This is chaos - there is no rhythm, no rhyme or reason - just violence. The next part of the movie is just as stunning. Wyatt strides irritatedly out into the street. When informed that the crazy indian is shooting up the place for fun, , he simply and pointedly climbs up the wall with no fear, and enters an upstairs window. The simplicity and directness of it surprises you - you wonder why no one else thought of it. You hear the scream as he enters into a ladies bedroom(brothel?), then only the sound of a thump as he dispatches the drunk. He exits the saloon dragging the indian by the feet and tosses him into the street. This all takes about the same amount of time as it took me to write it down - economical, rhythmic storytelling at it's best.

 

The whole barber and church scene is so leisurely, so flowing, the peace of the desert has come to the town, rolling over it like the smell of honeysuckle.... or is that cologne? Now that the Earps are here, things will be OK, or maybe because of the new church.... the bell rings calmly, the tower looms over the landscape but doesn't dwarf it, since it is hollow and airy, letting the sunlight and sky shine through. The church spire mimics the desert - how could I have not noticed this before? there is a beautiful earthly red spire sticking up out of the ground to the right of the new church. The land is a solid, more real church than any man could ever build. Even as the dance begins, the rhythm of this scene doesn't change, we are treated to a delicious montage of faces, foot tapping, and couples shot surprisingly close to the camera as they whirl and spin, but all to that same heartbeat of rhythm Ford set up when Fonda was sitting on his chair, balancing.

 

Linda Darnell - she is never better than in this picture. God, she was good! I never realized before how sympathetic she is. A beautiful performance. And the way she throws that pitcher of water over Ward Bond - beautiful!

 

The scene with Doc, sitting in his room looking at the mirror. Because of the other Ford films I have watched, I see this as the bookend to Wyatt's heartfelt graveside talk with James. Except Doc has no dead watching after him from above - he only sees himself looking back at him, full of reproach and self loathing. He is very alone, even if it is his own fault. A beautifully shot and acted scene.

 

Henry Fonda - I cannot get over this performance. The scene that really sticks out for me this time is the casual way he moseys up to Doc at the bar the second time - Doc who is on a tear, just waiting to smash something or kill something, or get himself killed.... the way Fonda speaks to him, so calm, so relaxed.... like they were just playing cards or something, not like he was stopping a possible killing or facing getting killed himself. He could charm a lion, that one. It tears me up that he and Ben Johnson never had any movie scenes together, because they both had this ability to seem as relaxed as could be when facing danger, or as tight as a spring depending on the situation. I could cry they never had the chance to work together as actors.

 

The low dark cloud rolling in when Virgil Earp goes calling on the Clantons for the last time.

 

Cathy Downs - I have never payed attention to her before, except as a plot device. She was good! _Very_ good.

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Going from memory on the scene where Earp is so calm when Holiday is going a bit nuts is precisely the way it needed to be handled. Earp remains calm thus creating an air that causes Doc to calm down. Of course Earp is confident in his ability to handle it. Any reaction that is excitable will feed Doc's attitude. He can't rile Earp so he is reduced to calming down because he can't sustain it.

 

How is that for confusing?

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I totally get that! Sometimes it's not the words but the thought behind them... I think we are good enough friends now to know what the other is saying. If it doesn't quite come out the way we want that someone will still understand it....

 

The way Fonda acts calm is just amazing.... you completely forget he is acting. He's not even trying - - he doesn't put it on, or use a lulling voice or anything...it's like they were just walking down the street or something. It's as if he were talking to his brother. You can see for a moment Doc trying to react the same way he always does..... then realizing he can't, and then giving it up.

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Wow. little missy!!

 

> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Ford's use of rhythm in the film is outstanding. He uses it to great effect creating the quiet, still, wide open spaces and the crazy loud wide open town. I've never seen such a contrast between two places before... Ford was brilliant in the way he makes that town seem like a free for all, just by sound and light.... it also points up how long the Earps have been on their own in the desert... the town is so amplified to them, because they have not seen people for so long.

 

I love how you catch so much stuff. Your posts are always so valuable to me because I get a whole new perspective on things after reading

 

 

> The whole barber and church scene is so leisurely, so flowing, the peace of the desert has come to the town, rolling over it like the smell of honeysuckle.... or is that cologne?

 

Ha!! I loved that bit w/ Wyatt saying "It's me" ha. It is one of my favorite parts of that segment of the story. So matter of fact. Almost as if he should be rolling his eyes when he says it (only a little bit disgusted, ha)

 

> Now that the Earps are here, things will be OK, or maybe because of the new church.... the bell rings calmly, the tower looms over the landscape but doesn't dwarf it, since it is hollow and airy, letting the sunlight and sky shine through.

 

I really noticed that church bell this time too. It almost seemed as if it was sounding the news. "Come on out everybody. We are going to be a real community now, and you are all invited" I found myself wondering how far that thing could be heard (with the wind carrying the sound out there in the desert.

 

> Linda Darnell - she is never better than in this picture. God, she was good! I never realized before how sympathetic she is. A beautiful performance. And the way she throws that pitcher of water over Ward Bond - beautiful!

 

I wanted to hit her and hug her all at the same time. She is so cold and "self" preserving. (as in, I have to look out for my own interests because NO ONE is going to look out for me, but me) and it DID make her more sympathetic because of it. I could see her as a little girl never getting anyone's love and then growing up longing for it still. She had a spirit about her though, ha. (I love the scene w/ that pitcher too. VERY unexpected)

 

> The scene with Doc, sitting in his room looking at the mirror. Because of the other Ford films I have watched, I see this as the bookend to Wyatt's heartfelt graveside talk with James. Except Doc has no dead watching after him from above - he only sees himself looking back at him, full of reproach and self loathing. He is very alone, even if it is his own fault. A beautifully shot and acted scene.

 

OH talk about a sympathetic character. I loved the part where he completes the Hamlet soliloquy in the bar. OH my.

 

> Henry Fonda - I cannot get over this performance.... He could charm a lion, that one.

 

That is a great way to describe him (especially in the scene you mentioned)... A lion charmer. But he himself was almost cat-like in the way he moved. (I liked the way you described him as he went after the indian) He was grace and charm, (and just the right mix of 'manly" and "awkward" w/ Clementine, too. ha) He was also very much filled w/ "fight and determination" at the right moments. But in a quiet deliberate way. No "hot headed knee-jerk" stuff with him. I really like this performance for Fonda a lot.

 

I wish you had gotten to see the shoot out part this time. OH me... I still found it as suspenseful as ever. But wow.. so quiet in places. NO sound at all... not even the wind. It really built the tension.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> that was beauteeeeful, Jackie. I hope to reply tongiht or tomorrow to your wonderful observations. leave it to you to find just the perfect words to describe movies.

 

I just get excited. :)

 

And this one was my first real Ford film.... I watched it when I was about 21, and it blew me away! It was like a revelation to me. I went to look it up to see who directed it and was hooked on Ford ever since. I had copied it off of AMC I think. I haven't watched it for so long, since my last copy was a VHS tape. It's a really meaningful movie to me. I even used to use it as a test - if you liked it, you could stay my friend. :D

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>

> And this one was my first real Ford film.... I watched it when I was about 21, and it blew me away! It was like a revelation to me. I went to look it up to see who directed it and was hooked on Ford ever since. I had copied it off of AMC I think. I haven't watched it for so long, since my last copy was a VHS tape. It's a really meaningful movie to me. I even used to use it as a test - if you liked it, you could stay my friend. :D

 

I like that litmus test, I may use it. :)

 

I actually don't know what movie was my gateway to Ford. I'd been watching his movies for years without ever understanding all the fuss about them. One day, something just clicked. It may have been How Green Was My Valley, I seem to recall that's the first one that made me react in a strongly emotional way. But I don't know. He just grew on me gradually, like moss. :D

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Ha... Ms. Favell.. again we posted at the same time. ha. (It is our " trademark signature") ha.

 

if you liked it, you could stay my friend.

 

WOW... ha. You took your movies SERIOUSLY.. even back then! ha. (ps.. I LOVE this film, ha. glad I pass the test!! ha)

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>I wanted to hit her and hug her all at the same time. She is so cold and "self" preserving. (as in, I have to look out for my own interests because NO ONE is going to look out for me, but me) and it DID make her more sympathetic because of it. I could see her as a little girl never getting anyone's love and then growing up longing for it still. She had a spirit about her though, ha. (I love the scene w/ that pitcher too. VERY unexpected)

 

That's a perfect backstory for her! You really nailed it....

 

I found myself completely sympathetic to her this time. I used to get mad at her. She has no thought at all for the consequences of anything... she is not smart, or cunning. She is simply emotion without anything to corral it in. But I really felt she was not purposefully bad - she just grew up in that bad town.... hurt or be hurt.

 

And she had dead on aim.... I don't think I have ever seen anyone douse someone as completely as she did...and I gotta admit I LOVED watching Ward get so thoroughly soaked... It almost makes me wonder if he knew the scene was going to end that way.

 

>That is a great way to describe him (especially in the scene you mentioned)... A lion charmer. But he himself was almost cat-like in the way he moved. (I liked the way you described him as he went after the indian) He was grace and charm, (and just the right mix of 'manly" and "awkward" w/ Clementine, too. ha) He was also very much filled w/ "fight and determination" at the right moments. But in a quiet deliberate way. No "hot headed knee-jerk" stuff with him. I really like this performance for Fonda a lot.

 

Not hot headed at all - I liked that the reason he went after the indian in the first place was so he could just get a shave in peace. The way he did it was so matter of fact, like a kid scrambling up a tree cause he was hungry and wanted an apple. He just wanted someone to take care of it, and if no one would then let's just get it over with. He's always so shocked when people make a big deal out of him doing something.

 

I have to say that I have long loved Wyatt Earp just because of that barber and dance sequence - how happy and confused he is when Clem asks him to go to church - and you see everything in his face - how he WASN'T remotely thinking of going to church, how she doesn't know that, how he simply blurts out yes, like he was planning to go all along...

 

and then, the wonderful way he works up to asking her to dance... standing there for what seems like eons....realizing he is still wearing his hat, then worrying that hat in his hands.... then that absolutely incredible moment when he flings his hat aside...oh...gosh! and then he asks her to dance... half expecting her to say no. The fear with which he approaches his doom on the dance floor (I can hear his thoughts - 'why did I do that? I ain't no dancer') but his resigned willingness to potentially blow it all by dancing.... the way he takes her cape, and THEN Russell SImpson makes a HUGE deal over him making everyone step back to watch them.... and finally how happy he is as he actually sees that she appreciates it, and he is having FUN! I love that scene so much. The capper is priceless, Ford comedy at it's best and most charming - the two Earp brothers driving up - "Well, I'll be...."

 

>I wish you had gotten to see the shoot out part this time. OH me... I still found it as suspenseful as ever. But wow.. so quiet in places. NO sound at all... not even the wind. It really built the tension.

 

OH MY GOSH, the way the movie has these long silences ---- all through it! THAT is so impressive to me...the silences are EVERYTHING. Such meaningful ones. I think this is why the film still gets to me every time...it could really be my favorite Fordie, and that is saying A LOT.

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The thing I like about the church and the dance is, apart from the community aspect Ford always does, is that we are not waiting. We have a floor and a bell. That is enough to make them feel whole. There is progress. They don't need the whole of everything to be done. The end is in sight. On they go.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> >

> if you liked it, you could stay my friend. :D

>

> *I like that litmus test, I may use it. :)*

 

Feel free... :)

 

I just knew that if you didn't like it, you weren't going to be a close friend to me. And heaven forbid someone should make fun of Chihuahua's name or the songs, or anything about the movie... I even had some borderline cases, where they started out making fun, then got caught up in it and said they really liked it at the end even though they weren't expecting to. They didn't know how lucky they were that they ended up liking it. :)

 

>The thing I like about the church and the dance is, apart from the community aspect Ford always does, is that we are not waiting. We have a floor and a bell. That is enough to make them feel whole. There is progress. They don't need the whole of everything to be done. The end is in sight. On they go.

 

I love that! Church is a work in progress, and always will be....

 

 

> I actually don't know what movie was my gateway to Ford. I'd been watching his movies for years without ever understanding all the fuss about them. One day, something just clicked. It may have been How Green Was My Valley, I seem to recall that's the first one that made me react in a strongly emotional way. But I don't know. He just grew on me gradually, like moss. :D

 

I had seen Ford films for years without anything really clicking - I used to watch *Prisoner of Shark Island* when it was on, when I was maybe nine?and liked it. I know *The Grapes of Wrath* completely stirred me at age twelve or so, and I loved it, but I didn't really realize who directed it. I think I also saw *the Informer* around that time and it moved me greatly as well.

 

Movies were separate things to me, and I never realized that someone was in charge of the whole thing, or that one director could make so many of my favorites. With Clementine my mind was opened to the genius of Ford. I remember my ex and I saying it was the most brilliant movie, here in the guise of a silly western.... and wondering why no one knew about it.

 

Ro- I am getting so I am afraid to post anymore... I am so sure I will hit the button at the same time you do... :D:D

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Mar 19, 2010 1:15 PM

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I learned three things watching "My Darling Clementine." (I pretty much already knew them.) Doc Holliday is an arrogant SOB. Chihuahua throws like a girl. And Wyatt Earp is as slow and measured and deliberate as any western character.

 

Holliday is a contradiction of sorts. He is two men who loves two different women. Chihuahua appeals to the wild earthy side of him while Clementine appeals to the cultured educated side. He can not find fulfillment in either. Clementine either doesn't know about Holliday or chooses to ignore his faults and past. She seems too good and upstanding to condone his life by being with him if s he knew all about him.

 

Earp is a man of few words. He is a man of business. In the first meeting of Doc and Wyatt you see it. We talked about earlier but they now, especially Doc, are going to find out what they are made of. Doc particularly wants to show he is a better man by virtue of his toughness and his culture. Wyatt says "Howdy." Doc says "Good evening." Doc demands champagne and Wyatt wants a whiskey. Wyatt defuses by taking the whiskey but then playfully insults the drink. They will be fine.

 

Earp is at times nonchalant of his own fame. He throws his name around as if he were like anyone but everyone knows him and it carries weight. It does not go to his head. It is different with Clanton. There he uses it for effect. He knows it got Clanton's attention.

 

The story is a clash of personalities and wills, all save for Wyatt and Clementine. The women disagree. Wyatt and Doc disagree but they all come together when it counts.

 

About the ending scene. My DVD has both versions. The first has Wyatt talking to Clementine. He tells her of his plans, shakes hands and gets on his horse and rides off. The second is the final version where the scene has a studio shot of Wyatt kissing Clementine on the cheek. I prefer the former. Wyatt, with his gentleness and shyness with Clementine doesn't strike me as the kind who would be bold enough with her to kiss her. The first way just seems more natural.

 

It is probably Mature's best performance. Even with the twist of history the story and the supporting cast adds plenty of depth and makes for a first rate film.

 

It's just my take on things.

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> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> I learned three things watching "My Darling Clementine." (I pretty much already knew them.) Doc Holliday is an arrogant SOB. Chihuahua throws like a girl. And Wyatt Earp is as slow and measured and deliberate as any western character.

 

OH me! ha. Chris, why don't you tell us how you REALLY feel. ha. :-)

 

I like your bold take on all three characters, sir.

 

And I do see your point about Doc.. he does have a level of arrogance. But you know what I saw mor in him... self deception. He wanted to believe he was NO LONGER the man Clem once knew (and in many ways he wasn't) but he still had his pride and he still had a level of honor about him that all that booze and "wrong living" could not cover up. He made sure Wyatt knew Chihuahua had lied about where she got that necklace. It was not that he wanted to rat her out, or even the Clantons. He wanted HIS name cleared. That said a lot to me about what he really was deep down inside, underneath all the "outer shell" he'd built around him. I liked that about him a lot.

 

And you are right on target about Wyatt. He was a very "deliberate" sort of person. In fact, I saw a different kind of arrogance in HIM than I did in Holliday. But it suited him a lot. He was a straight shooter and he did not put up w/ anything once there was something he was being asked to put up with. (and I liked that about HIM a lot too)

 

And as for Chihuahua throwing like a girl.. ha. well... she WAS one wasn't she??? (and PS.. we gals will take that as a compliment... she was a DEAD shot w/ that pitcher, now wasn't she??? ha)

 

> Earp is at times nonchalant of his own fame. He throws his name around as if he were like anyone but everyone knows him and it carries weight. It does not go to his head. It is different with Clanton. There he uses it for effect. He knows it got Clanton's attention.

 

OH boy, the look on old man Clanton's face. It was is he had just swallowed his gum.. if only for a moment. And then he looked MAD.

 

> About the ending scene. My DVD has both versions. The first has Wyatt talking to Clementine. He tells her of his plans, shakes hands and gets on his horse and rides off. The second is the final version where the scene has a studio shot of Wyatt kissing Clementine on the cheek. I prefer the former. Wyatt, with his gentleness and shyness with Clementine doesn't strike me as the kind who would be bold enough with her to kiss her. The first way just seems more natural.

 

I liked the kiss. I wanted the kiss. Give me the ending with the kiss. (HA!) :-)

 

> It is probably Mature's best performance. Even with the twist of history the story and the supporting cast adds plenty of depth and makes for a first rate film.

 

I am sure a lot of liberties were taken with the historical facts (we are talking about a Fordie, afterall) and the whole incident at the OK Corral is the stuff that legends are made of. But boy... it was a grand film, wasn't it? And the ending with Holiday was a very poignant one. In this version he got to go out on his terms (rather than the sadder way that history records)

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*The low dark cloud rolling in when Virgil Earp goes calling on the Clantons for the last time.*

 

Storms rolling in as a sign of trouble ahead are a great devices that have been used throughout literature. I don't know who first put the idea across on film but Pappy, Sam Peckinpah and a handful of other great directors used that analogy to great effect.

 

Next time you watch a film, a western, a film noir, any genre really (except maybe musicals), even tv shows from *The West Wing* to *Bones* to *Lost* to fill in the blank.

 

Stop and think about it, the storm rolls in, all he** breaks loose, the story comes to a climax, lives are lost, lives are saved, and when it is over, the storm moves on but everyone is changed in the aftermath.

 

Any time I hear thunder in the distance on a soundtrack, I brace myself because I know a storm is not only brewing overhead but in the lives of the characters that I am watching.

 

And I am rarely disappointed.

 

After all these years, even MrC has picked up on it. Score one for me.

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The interesting thing about Doc and Clem's relationship i not knowing what went before. There must be something of the man Clem knew once but even Doc knows he really is not the complete same man. Why else would he run her off? Clem certainly wants to recapture that time though I think she is better off without him. Even Doc is not happy with what he has become. That is why, I think, he throws the glass through his diploma. (He does not throw like a girl.:) )

 

I am glad you took my joke about Chihuahua as a compliment. It is funny that she is so mad and wants to throw the pitcher at Doc but she's not even close.

 

Great film.

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I think the main thing about Doc in this film is that he knows he is dying from TB, and that is very depressing to him.

 

In the old days, it was common for people from the East to go out West if they had TB, since there was no medical treatment, but the dry air and climate of the West tended to make them less sick than the Eastern climate.

 

So Doc lost both his fine girlfriend and his medical practice back East, and he doesn?t know how much time he has left to live. So he lives in Tombstone, dates an uneducated bar girl, takes risks and chances with his life, and waits.

 

That?s why he finished the Shakespeare lines about ?To be or not to be?. Those lines go on in great detail and are quite profound, especially to someone in Doc?s situation.

 

He knows that if he goes back East with his old girlfriend, or if she stays out West with him, he will become more and more sick, and she will wind up taking care of him and ruining her life, and he will eventually be gone, but by then she will be old and probably too old to go back East and find a good husband.

 

So Doc is basically not a bad guy, he?s just very disgusted and depressed, and he doesn?t want to ruin Clementine?s life.

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*No Name On The Bullet* is a tense character study of what can happen to people with a guilty conscience.

 

Audie Murphy stars as a renowned and self proclaimed killer-for-hire named John Gant. He shows up in a small town and immediately sets most of the town on edge. People leap to the conclusion that he has come for them. Gant strikes up a respectful if slightly uncomfortable friendship with the town doctor (Charles Drake.) Drake knows what everyone is saying but is reluctant to believe it as he feels he has seen a different side of Gant. He is a self appointed go-between trying to keep the peace.

 

The climax comes when it is revealed who Gant has come for and his facing the doctor who tries to stop him.

 

Most unusual casting for Murphy. He plays the part very low key but with authority. He spends a good deal of his time drinking coffee watching the town self destruct and being philosophical with the doctor. He never denies why he is there but refuses to confirm anything. This riles the town even more. He is calm even when confronted. This adds to his mystery and it makes everyone more scared.

 

At 77 minutes it is a quick and, for me, enjoyable time. Even Whit Bissell shows up among a cast of familiar faces.

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Howdy, Cowboy!

 

I am not sure if this is one of the many Audies I watched a long time ago when AMC used to show them. I'd like to see it, based on your commentary. I like him "quiet". Like The Quiet American (a film that gets a bit draggy but I nevertheless am drawn to Murphy's mostly low-burning intensity. When he talks about sleeping with the gun, which he apparently did in real life, it gave me chills.)

 

I think he makes an intriguing western actor and I would like to have seen him play Billy the Kid. Something about him makes me think he could have brought the Kid to life in a frightening way, yet not without some sense of loss of innocence. Maybe it's that fresh face, so at odds with the warrior image.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Howdy, Cowboy!

>

> I am not sure if this is one of the many Audies I watched a long time ago when AMC used to show them. I'd like to see it, based on your commentary. I like him "quiet". Like The Quiet American (a film that gets a bit draggy but I nevertheless am drawn to Murphy's mostly low-burning intensity. When he talks about sleeping with the gun, which he apparently did in real life, it gave me chills.)

>

> I think he makes an intriguing western actor and I would like to have seen him play Billy the Kid. Something about him makes me think he could have brought the Kid to life in a frightening way, yet not without some sense of loss of innocence. Maybe it's that fresh face, so at odds with the warrior image.

 

 

Oh my gosh, Goddess! You know, I agree with you 100%. I am not too knowledgeable about Murphy's acting and movies, but there is always something just a bit.... oh, kind of wild cardish ..... about him, even though he portrayed a good guy. Still waters run deep, I guess. I could never put my finger on that deep scary feeling before, but you said it.

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