Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Western Movie Rambles


Recommended Posts

>Maybe it's that fresh face, so at odds with the warrior image.

 

I think that is part of the appeal. He looks like such a sweet guy and it is part of what makes that character so tough and appealing. You have an interesting idea about Billy The Kid. This movie along with his character in "Night Passage" are about as close as we'll get.

 

If you have ever seen "To Hell and Back" I, at least, have found it amazing how young he looked and that was 10 years after the war.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> Audie did play Billy the Kid. "The Kid from Texas" from 1950 with Murphy and Gale Storm...

 

Oh, goodness, really Fred?? I hope Encore Westerns does a month on Audie, like they spotlight other performers. I want to see that one. Thanks, if anyone would know if he played the kid, it would be you. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

>

> Oh my gosh, Goddess! You know, I agree with you 100%. I am not too knowledgeable about Murphy's acting and movies, but there is always something just a bit.... oh, kind of wild cardish ..... about him, even though he portrayed a good guy. Still waters run deep, I guess. I could never put my finger on that deep scary feeling before, but you said it.

 

Back when I lived in L.A., one of the old timers I knew who used to work for one of the studios said he met Murphy one day, and that he had never in his life seen such eyes. He said they were cold blue and deadly looking. He said it gave him chills.

 

Ever since then I looked more closely at Audie's performances, and can see traces of that disturbing quality, in stark contrast to what obviously remained of the simple, kindly country boy that was.

 

The poor man, he saw so much death and I think it made him a haunted creature.

Link to post
Share on other sites

>

> I think that is part of the appeal. He looks like such a sweet guy and it is part of what makes that character so tough and appealing. You have an interesting idea about Billy The Kid. This movie along with his character in "Night Passage" are about as close as we'll get.

>

 

I like him in Night Passage. In fact, the movie really picks up for me when he enters it.

 

> If you have ever seen "To Hell and Back" I, at least, have found it amazing how young he looked and that was 10 years after the war.

 

I have not seen this, supposedly "autobiographical" movie of Murphy's. He did have a kind of baby face, and somehow that just always looks so tragic to me when I see such a face in a war movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good eve, Titania! :)

 

I just wanted to share a few words in reply to your wonderful, wonderful post on My Darling Clementine.

 

(Please, everyone, just let the Audie Murphy conversation continue to flow around this momentary obstruction in the rambling river. :D )

 

What I noticed about the movie:

 

Ford's use of rhythm in the film is outstanding. He uses it to great effect creating the quiet, still, wide open spaces and the crazy loud wide open town. I've never seen such a contrast between two places before... Ford was brilliant in the way he makes that town seem like a free for all, just by sound and light.... it also points up how long the Earps have been on their own in the desert... the town is so amplified to them, because they have not seen people for so long.

 

I am so with you on how striking the rhythm and pacing of this film is. Your observation about the town's raucousness seeming "amplified" is DEAD on. I hadn't thought about that one before but by gum you nailed it again!

 

I find the rhythm of the story unfolds like a lyrical ballad, a ballad of ruffians, cavaliers and ladies fair.

 

I underline "contrast" in your post because that's one other aspect of the way the movie's story is told that hits me. Everything seems to have a duality or contrasting element. Boiled down and simplified, it's the "wildness" contrasted with what I'll just call "civility" or the tamed. That duality is in so much of Ford's work, as it was in the man.

 

Ford also uses rhythm to create tension -

 

The Clantons first entrance is subtle, and the way Ford lingers on Pa's face too long makes us uncomfortable with them right from the start. The film is filled with talk that is too slow, responses that are pulled out and stretched - things are just wrong here in Tombstone. We KNOW the Clantons are bad'uns from the minute they appear, but it is easy to see why the Earps don't realize it.

 

Boy, is that ever right and the entrance of the Clanton's gives me chills every time. The dead frozen face of Grant Withers and the dead eyes of Brennan just seem to shout out their soullessness. They have no emotion when they speak. Billy Clanton (John Ireland) is the most emotional of the bunch, just as vicious, but weaker.

 

The same goes for Doc.... something is wrong, and his stillness is a sign of impending danger.

 

Notice how his eyes are like the two Clantons? They reflect death, in Doc's case his own. It just occurred to me. When surrounded by rambunctious life, look at Doc's expression:

 

vlcsnap-00003-1.jpg

vlcsnap-00008-1.jpg

vlcsnap-00001.jpg

 

He looks neither angry nor sad, just remote and rather distanced from any emotional reaction. And yet he's the wildest and most explosive character in the movie. More contrast and duality. The wildest westerner is in fact, an Easterner and a product of a civilized, educated background. More of the intricate pacing of this movie is contained in Victor Mature's performance, depicted as one of extreme stillness, as you observed, punctuated by frightening bursts of violence towards those who love him most. Very like the director.

 

The opposite use of rhythm in the barbershop scene, which was incredible! I didn't remember it at all, I don't know why, it is easily the best scene in the whole picture! A bullet whizzes out of nowhere smashing a cup of shaving cream and water with no warning at all. As the Earps walk around, bullets strike willy nilly, unexpectedly shattering things in their path...behind them.....amazingly no one is hit. This is chaos - there is no rhythm, no rhyme or reason - just violence. The next part of the movie is just as stunning. Wyatt strides irritatedly out into the street. When informed that the crazy indian is shooting up the place for fun, , he simply and pointedly climbs up the wall with no fear, and enters an upstairs window. The simplicity and directness of it surprises you - you wonder why no one else thought of it. You hear the scream as he enters into a ladies bedroom(brothel?), then only the sound of a thump as he dispatches the drunk. He exits the saloon dragging the indian by the feet and tosses him into the street. This all takes about the same amount of time as it took me to write it down - economical, rhythmic storytelling at it's best.

 

I never appreciated that scene so well as you described it yet it really is a grand "symphony" of sounds, sensations and wild-west thrills knocked into a brief amount of time. And in the center of it all, is the "simple, direct" Wyatt. He DOES make it look so easy, ha! Boy could we use his type around here. :D

 

The whole barber and church scene is so leisurely, so flowing, the peace of the desert has come to the town, rolling over it like the smell of honeysuckle.... or is that cologne? Now that the Earps are here, things will be OK, or maybe because of the new church.... the bell rings calmly, the tower looms over the landscape but doesn't dwarf it, since it is hollow and airy, letting the sunlight and sky shine through.

 

Great observation! Both the force represent by the Earps and the spirituality represented by the church seem destined to combine to tame Tombstone. Their respective arrivals so fast on the heels of one another.

 

The church spire mimics the desert - how could I have not noticed this before? there is a beautiful earthly red spire sticking up out of the ground to the right of the new church.

 

Now see what you wrote? "A beautiful earthly red spire..." And it's a black-and-white movie. Gorgeously said!

 

Even as the dance begins, the rhythm of this scene doesn't change, we are treated to a delicious montage of faces, foot tapping, and couples shot surprisingly close to the camera as they whirl and spin, but all to that same heartbeat of rhythm Ford set up when Fonda was sitting on his chair, balancing.

 

It is the same, jaunty rhythm, ha!

 

Linda Darnell - she is never better than in this picture. God, she was good! I never realized before how sympathetic she is. A beautiful performance. And the way she throws that pitcher of water over Ward Bond - beautiful!

 

She's gorgeously uncontained, a childish hellion but in the end, made of brave stuff.

 

The scene with Doc, sitting in his room looking at the mirror. Because of the other Ford films I have watched, I see this as the bookend to Wyatt's heartfelt graveside talk with James. Except Doc has no dead watching after him from above - he only sees himself looking back at him, full of reproach and self loathing. He is very alone, even if it is his own fault. A beautifully shot and acted scene.

 

That was beautifully expressed and I never thought before about the parallels (contrast!) between this dark soliloquy and other similar chats with "the dead past".

 

I know it's fanciful, but I see Doc and Wyatt as reflections of the director, who could be easily be the man pictured staring at his own room full of tributes to his accomplishments, yet withdrawing in darkness and reaching for the bottle to drown black thoughts.

 

vlcsnap-00005-1.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00006-1.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00007-1.jpg

 

The scene also contrasts with Willy Priest's communion with the portrait of his family.

 

Henry Fonda - I cannot get over this performance. The scene that really sticks out for me this time is the casual way he moseys up to Doc at the bar the second time - Doc who is on a tear, just waiting to smash something or kill something, or get himself killed.... the way Fonda speaks to him, so calm, so relaxed.... like they were just playing cards or something, not like he was stopping a possible killing or facing getting killed himself. He could charm a lion, that one.

 

Again, I completely agree. I have seen MDC many times in the past year when it would air frequently on Encore Westerns and I couldn't turn away whenever it was on. Each time I liked Fonda's Earp more and more. What a character he created. That lithe figure moving through the caucaphony of Tombstone like a panther (Rohanaka you nailed it with your allusion to his catlike body language). He's so good at handling dangerous situations, he doesn't even have to think about it. He just watches what needs to be watched and acts smoothly to meet it. He seems to read people's minds because he looks at them and without saying the words it seems to me he's saying to them "I know exactly what's on your mind, mister, and I know what you are." Yet he is constantly exclaiming, "What kind of a town is this?" as if he'd never been in an outlaw ridden village in his life. It's a purer characterization of Wyatt Earp, it seems to suggest that he is little more than the simple, hard riding cattleman who happened to cross trails with the town and the Clantons. Nothing to do with the reality of the events or the real Wyatt Earp's background. I guess this was to heighten the contrast between Earp and the rest of the town, and make him a more likely candidate for "civilizing".

 

For it's Wyatt's gradual, graceful falling into the new ways coming that is part of his charm. Unlike Doc, who fled from civilization, Wyatt will become a part of it and he can do so with just a little awkwardness. He'll make the transition and it won't harm him. He moves with ease, physically, and will move with ease into a less wild mode of life.

 

It tears me up that he and Ben Johnson never had any movie scenes together, because they both had this ability to seem as relaxed as could be when facing danger, or as tight as a spring depending on the situation. I could cry they never had the chance to work together as actors.

 

Now THAT would be something to see!

 

Cathy Downs - I have never payed attention to her before, except as a plot device. She was good! Very good.

 

I admire how unruffled she is about everything, when you 'd think she'd be nervous and jittery to find herself in such a wild place. But she's always cool, never terribly surprised by human nature. This proves she, too, will make the transition from her soft Eastern life to western school marm (and Mrs Earp?) rather easily. She's made of stronger stuff than even Doc credits her. Following him all that way, through all the towns and rough, wild places, she had to be. She's not a slave to her emotions, though, as Chihuahua is. She's disciplined, even rather chilly in a way, if still sweet. Again, the contrast between her and Chihuahua is so striking, and both are like the two men, respectively. One has a handle on her emotions, the other does not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A few more words on "My Darling Clementine".Ford had only done one film after the war ended "They Were Expandable" for MGM. He owed Zanuck and Fox one more film under his contract. He viewed "Frontier Marshall" and told Zanuck he though it would make a good remake.Zanuck agreed and Ford went to working on the script with Winston Miller.

Ford wanted Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp. Next was Tyrone Power as Doc Holiday and Anne Baxter as Clementine.After Ty Power was dropped next came Douglas Fairbanks Jr., then Vincent Price. Zanuck pushed for Victor Mature.Ford wasn't sure but after meeting with Mature he said OK. .Zanuck said no to Anne Baxter and Ford had to settle for Cathy Downs. He was not happy with Linda Darnell at all.But as with Downs he had to settle for her.

This was the first picture he had shot in Monument Valley since "Stagecoach" As Robert O said the other night Ford and Brennan did not get along. Some say the hatred Brennan had for Ford he transferred to the Fonda character and that's why he looks so hateful at Wyatt Earp.But Ford was kind to Mature, maybe because Mature had served in the Coast Guard during the war and had done active duty in the North Atlantis for over a year.

After the shooting and editing was done and the first preview, that's when Zanuck stepped in did the reediting and some pick-up shots.He had done the same thing with "Grapes of Wrath" and "How Green was My Valley", Fords two Oscar winners. But Ford was not happy with what Zanuck had done to Clementine and left Fox to start Argosy Pictures. Even though Zanuck offered him $600,000 a year to stay.As Scott Eyman states in his book outside of "The Quite Man" and "The Seachers", studio assignments like "The Long Grey Line" and "Mogambo" seemed to be missing something. A lack of spark was noticeable in them..Maybe the conflict and criticizing between the two Ford and Zanuck combined to create some astonishing films.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for sharing those words about Clementine, I had not heard anything about Anne Baxter having been considered for the part of Clementine, but it's a shame it didn't happen, because I think she'd have been excellent in it.

 

As for a "lack of spark" in some post-Fox studio assignments, I think Scott Eyman might have a point. However in the case of Clementine I think a little more give-and-take between Zanuck and Ford might have helped it a bit more; from what I heard in the DVD documentary, Ford was simply gone by the time Zanuck started "fine-tuning" the film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops. sorry. some weird glitch in the system this morning.

 

fredb- while I have this accidental repost spot open, thanks for the info on My Darling Clementine's background. You know, as much as I want to say that Ford was a genius, and that he was right about getting away from the studio - I do think his Zanuck pictures are maybe his greatest works of art, with the exception of a few of his later films. If I were going to make a movie, I would want Zanuck as my producer.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Mar 24, 2010 9:03 AM

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Mar 24, 2010 9:30 AM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! That was some reply! I love my new nickname, btw. :D

 

>I find the rhythm of the story unfolds like a lyrical ballad, a ballad of ruffians, cavaliers and ladies fair.

 

That is so spot on! And yet, this film does not have as many musical numbers or interludes or even voice overs as some of the other Ford films to come.... it is simply in the way the movie flows.

 

I like that duality you bring up. I think you are saying that it is as if Doc and Wyatt are two halves of the same man (Ford?).

 

When I was reading your words, it came to me that Wyatt has stillness within him too. Part of what makes him a great character is that stillness at the center of the swirling vortex around him. As Doc's stillness indicates a violent outburst to come, or maybe just a deep hole of despair, Wyatt's stillness indicates something a little different. Depth, yes, but a quiet reserve and resiliency, the power of the desert within him.... he seems as if he could have gone through what Doc is going through, but come out the other side a better man, just as he came out of the desert at the beginning of the film. A modern day Moses? Doc is still lost in his inner desert, and he doesn't really want to find his way out. Wyatt has the strength to propel himself forward, whereas Doc cannot.

 

Thanks for posting that photo of Doc's reflection in his diploma! That is the shot that really captured my imagination, and made me think of all those family portrait talks in the Will Rogers films. SO why is Doc looking at his diploma instead of his mother, girl, or a family member? This brings up something else in Doc's character - is a man his job? or is he more? Doc is tied to his job in an odd way, he is almost joyous when he thinks he has saved Chihuahua. And conversely when she takes her turn downward, he is overcome with despair.

 

You have mentioned doctors having a place in Ford's films as characters a lot....I wonder where Doc fits in this group to you......he is an outcast doctor.... like the doc in Stagecoach, but he has other issues. I always have wondered why Doc is so hell bent on destroying himself - I have never felt it was JUST because he is dying...it makes me wonder if there was something else going on - he lost a patient, or he was at odds with his profession, maybe?

 

I also never noticed till you pointed it out just now, that Clem and Chihuahua are exactly like Wyatt and Doc.... the two sides again - this goes all the way through Ford's work -even Scar and Ethan, but I have never seen so much of this two sidedness as in this movie - the women are also a side of each man - each completes the other.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hola, Titania!

 

>

> I like that duality you bring up. I think you are saying that it is as if Doc and Wyatt are two halves of the same man (Ford?).

>

 

Could be , I do sense in Doc a character that is rather new to the Ford cannon, a defeated man with a troubling nature, one that doesn't allow him to be a part of life. I also think Wyatt and Doc can be thought of as two sides of "man" himself, especially of that period.

 

> When I was reading your words, it came to me that Wyatt has stillness within him too. Part of what makes him a great character is that stillness at the center of the swirling vortex around him. As Doc's stillness indicates a violent outburst to come, or maybe just a deep hole of despair, Wyatt's stillness indicates something a little different. Depth, yes, but a quiet reserve and resiliency, the power of the desert within him.... he seems as if he could have gone through what Doc is going through, but come out the other side a better man, just as he came out of the desert at the beginning of the film. A modern day Moses? Doc is still lost in his inner desert, and he doesn't really want to find his way out. Wyatt has the strength to propel himself forward, whereas Doc cannot.

>

 

That's terrific, Jackie---Wyatt's stillness is riveting. Fonda manages to convey it in his eyes, they always level gazing at people. His gaze never wavers for an instant. He's not conflicted at all. He has a confidence that is supreme, almost kingly. I find it awesome. I love how he sets up the showdown. He's so methodical, such a strategist. Again, it's cold, clear logic on his part. The complete opposite to Doc.

 

Doc's eyes seem turned inward, like he doesn't even see the people near him. His blank, stony expression right after Chihuahua kisses him under her sombrero, is very telling. And then he turns contemptuously to her and wounds her with cutting remarks. Ford seemed to really tap into the natures of both men, and by showing Doc being mean to Chihuahua he adds a very dark shading to his character, but also generates a lot of sympathy from us for Chihuahua. It will make his attempt to save her later, more poignant and his character even more contradictory.

 

 

> Thanks for posting that photo of Doc's reflection in his diploma! That is the shot that really captured my imagination, and made me think of all those family portrait talks in the Will Rogers films. SO why is Doc looking at his diploma instead of his mother, girl, or a family member? This brings up something else in Doc's character - is a man his job? or is he more? Doc is tied to his job in an odd way, he is almost joyous when he thinks he has saved Chihuahua. And conversely when she takes her turn downward, he is overcome with despair.

>

 

Great questions---I feel like he's looking at the ghost of himself in the past. I imagine failure is something many men feel crushed by. Each handles it a different way. He's almost masochistic to hang up his past honors like that, to mock him. He's constantly hurting himself. Drinking too much, courting death with provocation to gunplay, turning away people who love him, respect him.

 

> You have mentioned doctors having a place in Ford's films as characters a lot....I wonder where Doc fits in this group to you......he is an outcast doctor.... like the doc in Stagecoach, but he has other issues. I always have wondered why Doc is so hell bent on destroying himself - I have never felt it was JUST because he is dying...it makes me wonder if there was something else going on - he lost a patient, or he was at odds with his profession, maybe?

>

 

I feel like it's something more, too, because he tells Clem that his illness is not behind his fleeing from the East. I wonder if he's just a tormented man. AFter all, why was Ford himself so subject to deep, black periods of depression and isolation? He once said to Eugene O'Neill, who is probably his only superior in depths of morbidity, that the only explanation for people like them was that they were Irish. Perhaps Ford is, in the portrayal of Doc as in every one of his films, just requiring us to take the man as he is, for what he is, and not expect to ever know or understand all. Movies tend to try to fill in all the blanks for us, especially with the leading characters, and he seldom indulged that.

 

 

> I also never noticed till you pointed it out just now, that Clem and Chihuahua are exactly like Wyatt and Doc.... the two sides again - this goes all the way through Ford's work -even Scar and Ethan, but I have never seen so much of this two sidedness as in this movie - the women are also a side of each man - each completes the other.

 

That is what I'm starting to see. I even notice that Cathy Downs moves very quietly and delicately and Chihuahua, well, you know she's in the room, ha! She flounces. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

>I feel like he's looking at the ghost of himself in the past. I imagine failure is something many men feel crushed by. Each handles it a different way. He's almost masochistic to hang up his past honors like that, to mock him. He's constantly hurting himself. Drinking too much, courting death with provocation to gunplay, turning away people who love him, respect him.

 

That's brilliant. Yes, that is just the feeling you get - "just an old graveyard ghost" as Muley says. So the person he is communing with is his own dead self. And that dead self has no advice to give, no comfort to share with his later self. So good, Goddess - you really are making me think here. He really wants to cling onto something.... "I was mean to Chihuahua, so now if I save her, everything will be forgiven.... " and it's interesting how he listens to Wyatt - why does he? He doesn't listen to anyone else - certainly not Clem. He wants to trust Wyatt - when Wyatt tells him not to provoke someone killing him - "That's a sucker play." - Doc listens to him...you can almost see him wanting Wyatt to tell him why, talk him down. He respects Wyatt, but also I think this is what leads me to believe Wyatt has been right where Doc is emotionally. I think Doc senses that Wyatt can understand what others do not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

>I feel like he's looking at the ghost of himself in the past. I imagine failure is something many men feel crushed by. Each handles it a different way. He's almost masochistic to hang up his past honors like that, to mock him. He's constantly hurting himself. Drinking too much, courting death with provocation to gunplay, turning away people who love him, respect him.

 

It is very much of the ghost and a reminder not only of what he was but what he isn't anymore. Failure can ruin a man because they take on so much and much is expected of them. Doc almost regained that by operating on Chihuahua but even her death he has to feel responsible for. Never mind the seriousness of the wound, he takes it personally. One more failure in a failed life. What could possibly be left. Most likely nothing except to help his one friend and take whatever happens.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> >I feel like he's looking at the ghost of himself in the past. I imagine failure is something many men feel crushed by. Each handles it a different way. He's almost masochistic to hang up his past honors like that, to mock him. He's constantly hurting himself. Drinking too much, courting death with provocation to gunplay, turning away people who love him, respect him.

>

> It is very much of the ghost and a reminder not only of what he was but what he isn't anymore. Failure can ruin a man because they take on so much and much is expected of them. Doc almost regained that by operating on Chihuahua but even her death he has to feel responsible for. Never mind the seriousness of the wound, he takes it personally. One more failure in a failed life. What could possibly be left. Most likely nothing except to help his one friend and take whatever happens.

 

 

That was perfectly said, mm.

Link to post
Share on other sites

OH wow... April what a great perspective you are bringing in to MDC, little missy. (woo HOO!!)

 

> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> I underline "contrast" in your post because that's one other aspect of the way the movie's story is told that hits me. Everything seems to have a duality or contrasting element. Boiled down and simplified, it's the "wildness" contrasted with what I'll just call "civility" or the tamed. That duality is in so much of Ford's work, as it was in the man.

 

I love all the info and insight you have on Ford. And I think he must have been one of the more "personalized" filmmakers of that day... meaning that he put so much of his OWN personality and thought and emotion into his films.

 

And I love your thoughts and comments on Doc. You have really just drawn out all the details on his inner personality.

 

> He looks neither angry nor sad, just remote and rather distanced from any emotional reaction. And yet he's the wildest and most explosive character in the movie. More contrast and duality.

 

He was wild. And (yet looked so "unwild" on the outside.Remote and distanced are the right words. Almost quietly resolved that he was nearing the end of his existance and he was pondering his own mortality. It was like we were getting to see his outward expression of all his innermost thoughts not by the wildness.. but more by those "dead calm" moments.

 

RE: why he was there in Tombstone instead of back East:

> I feel like it's something more, too, because he tells Clem that his illness is not behind his fleeing from the East. I wonder if he's just a tormented man

 

I think you may have it.. but also I think here is a part of the puzzle too:

> The wildest westerner is in fact, an Easterner and a product of a civilized, educated background.

 

Perhaps he was just born in the wrong place. He may have TRIED to fit in that civilized, educated world all his life and realized it just was not really HIM.. and the west was more REAL to him. And also.. I just wanted to add that I always took it that his illness came after he left the East... and maybe he even felt like it was his "punishment" for leaving..

 

(oh.. and PS, Mr Movieman.. I think you have it right too.. he was likely feeling like a failure too)

 

I don't know. I might be wrong and reading too much into it all... but that was my take. Anyway... what I trying to say is... he felt guilty for leaving Clem high and dry the way he did... and for "failing" those who must have had higher expectations for him so he felt like "he'd gotten what he deserved" in letting them all down. (again.. I may be wrong... but I can see him reflecting on all that as his body started to let HIM down over time. It is wrong thinking... but it could be what was on his mind)

 

Thanks again for bringing more goodies to the table, little gal. Your rambling thoughts are always a delight! :-)

 

(Oh.. and PS folks.. I'm with Miss G.. I hope there is more to read on Audie too. I have not seen that film, but have enjoyed the discussion)

Link to post
Share on other sites

>(Oh.. and PS folks.. I'm with Miss G.. I hope there is more to read on Audie too. I have not seen that film, but have enjoyed the discussion)

 

Someday soon. I really thought we were done with "Clementine" at least for awhile.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> >(Oh.. and PS folks.. I'm with Miss G.. I hope there is more to read on Audie too. I have not seen that film, but have enjoyed the discussion)

>

> Someday soon. I really thought we were done with "Clementine" at least for awhile.

 

I just saw THE KID FROM TEXAS. It was pretty routinely directed, but Audie does make sense cast as Billy the Kid. However, there was no real nuance or depth to any of the characterizations, in spite of the presence of several veteran supporting actors. I feel sorry for the Audie, he got typecast to play so many gunmen and he probably wanted nothing more than to put all that behind him.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched "Frenchie." An unfortunately named but ok western from Joel McCrea's Saturday run on Encore. "Frenchie" is played by Shelley Winters as a woman out to revenge the death of her father. I have never been a fan of Winters but she is quite likable here. Partnered with Elsa Lanchester, of all people, to run her saloon they make for an interesting grouping. One scene even includes a rough and tumble slapfest with Winters and Marie Windsor. McCrea comes to their rescue.

 

Some drama, some action and some comedy make this an odd little film. It certainly isn't going to be on anyone's list of favorite anything but it might be worth a look just because it is so rare.

 

*MissG*

 

I haven't seen the Murphy film you saw but when you think about it westerns and an occasional war film was about all he did. Depending on where he was he may have been bored or too new to give it much. Of course, those Universal International type films ("Frenchie" was also one) didn't aim to be much more than early features at the theater on a Saturday.

 

Edited by: movieman1957 on Mar 29, 2010 11:05 AM

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Frenchie, too. It was a thinly disguised rework of Destry Rides Again. I finally got to see Wichita in the same Encore line-up and enjoyed that one a little more. It was nice to see Vera Miles, in what may be the only non-Hitch, non-Ford movie I've seen her do so far. Joel made an upstanding Wyatt Earp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, we almost went to the movies together.

 

I'm glad you pointed that out. I was thinking some of this had a familiarity to it but I wasn't sure because it was only a little of it. Did you notice Hank Worden? He had some hair on his head. Not much but more than I have seen.

 

I also liked "Wichita" better.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're right about Audie getting pigeon holed as a gunman on either side of the badge. Even though most of the westerns films he did he was pretty good for the most part, when he had the chance to work with a top flight director he proved he could act. The two films he did with John Huston, "The Red Badge of Courage" { wish they could find the missing scenes} if they still exist.While not a great film, the studio didn't want Huston to do the film and took control of the editing and cut it from 95 minutes down to 69 minutes.Huston got fed up with the project and left to start "The African Queen". Murphy had one of his best roles in the other Huston film The Unforgiven" with Lancaster and Audrey Hepburn, In "The Quite American" he helt his own with Michael Redgrave, He had a lot of demons to over come and Hollywood didn't always use him wisely . He didn't want to play himself in his bio "To Hell and Back", he though the public would see him as capitalizing on his war experiences and he hoped Tony Curtis would be cast but Universal wanted him and the film remained the biggest grosser for them until "Jaws" hit the screen 20 years later in 1975.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> Hey, we almost went to the movies together.

>

 

We sure did! I really enjoyed the Joel fest. :)

 

> I'm glad you pointed that out. I was thinking some of this had a familiarity to it but I wasn't sure because it was only a little of it. Did you notice Hank Worden? He had some hair on his head. Not much but more than I have seen.

>

 

Ha! Yes you BET I saw my Hanky Panky! I always get the biggest lift from seeing his sweet, long tall self and that unmistakable voice!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdeee, Fredb!

 

I saw The Red Badge of Courage in grade school, I believe, and never have seen it since. I really need to, in spite of the butchering by the studio. I forgot about him in The Unforgiven, he was good there, very emotional, too. I found him very touching in The Quiet American. I do think he could be an interesting actor with a strong director.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdee thar Little Lady, Audie was better then a lot of people gave him credit for. Was he ever going to give Lawrence Olivier a run for his money, I doubt it, but I though he gave a good account of himself considering on the job training after James Cagney bought him to Hollywood. He had a lot of baggage and ghost that troubled him, which considering his war time experience was understandable Not many know he was also a song writer, a few he co-wrote the lyrics for were "Please Mr. Postman play a Song for Me" , "Leave the Weeping to the Willow Tree" and "When the Wind blows in Chicago".Artist like Dean Martin Eddy Arnold among others recorded some of them.I think he was more talented then a lot of people though..........

*********************************The Crosses Grow on Anzio*****************************************

Oh,gather 'round me comrades, and listen while I speak.

Of a war,a war,a war, where Hell is six feet deep.

Along the shores, the cannons roar. Oh how can a soldier sleep.

The goings slow on Anzio, where Hell is six feet deep.

 

Praise be to God, for this captured sod

that rich with blood does seep.

That Death awaits, there is no doubt; no triumph will we reap.

The crosses grow on Anzio, where Hell is six feet deep.

 

Audie Murphy** 1948

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Mar 29, 2010 9:57 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...