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Western Movie Rambles


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Howdy, movieman,

 

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> I wonder if by the time we got to the late 60s TV directors slipped easily between the two forms. We already had Andrew McLaglen who did a ton of "Have Gun - Will Travel" and nearly as many "Gunsmoke" episodes.

>

 

Oh definitely...John Frankenheimer is a big one who came out of TV.

 

>

> Slightly off topic - look at Simon Wincer who gave us the much respected and beloved "Lonesome Dove" was mostly a director of TV work. He had a few films "Quigley Down Under" (which my children used to "That Q Guy) and "Free Willy" but one might hardly think that the levels were equal to the work he did for television westerns. And he is from Australia.

 

Love those aussies. :) Somehow Australia resembles the west in spirit and terrain. I've seen most of Quigley and enjoy it. I like Selleck out west, he's a natural for it. Why he doesn't do more of them I don't know, it's a shame. He still looks good. And he looks like a man, ha.

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Well, I'm sure it wuold have been better had Leone directed, but like I said, it still

was a surprise that I found it enjoyable at all.

 

I looked up Go Tell the Spartans at Netflix and it doesn't seem to be available, it

would only let me "save" it. I'm afraid there are no rental stores anymore near me. :(

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I've seen GO TELL THE SPARTANS and it's easily Post's most accomplished work.

 

Another one of his duds was BENEATH THE PLANET OF THE APES, a film that did at least live up to its title. It starts off well enough, but once we get to the underground mutants, it's strictly from hunger.

 

You're absolutely right, there's nothing wrong with someone being a TV director, Lamont Johnson managed to go back-and-forth with some measures of success and Paul Wendkos is another. Eastwood hired Post out of loyalty to an old RAWHIDE cohort and perhaps because he needed someone who would be able to function on a limited schedule. However, there are reports that by the time of MAGNUM FORCE, Post was really second-in-command, that Clint was really calling the shots and that he and Post had argued on that occasion as opposed to being allied on this one.

 

Vincent McEveety did an excellent job on FIRECREEK, a film that holds up pretty well. It came a little late in the day for something so obviously inspired to some degree by HIGH NOON. It's something of a hybrid of that film and another Henry Fonda film, WELCOME TO HARD TIMES.

 

It looks like a theatrical film and by that I mean not just the framing of shots, but also the continuity. The story flows at a nice pace, although it is incredibly downbeat once we get to town. That Stewart and Fonda do a professional job is a given, but I have to say that this film contains about the best work that I've ever seen come from Gary Lockwood. The big surprise is the stellar work done by Robert Porter as the unfortunate Arthur. Porter had previously done an GUNSMOKE episode with the same director and it's a shame that we didn't hear much from him in the future.

 

McEveety guides all of his actors well and he deserves credit for the final confrontation scene. It goes on without any background music until we get to the showdown between Stewart and Fonda. It was as if it was decided that this was an opportunity to be savored given that even in 1968, the world knew of the friendship between the two leads and that this should given the emphasis of a scored background.

 

If there's any weak spot in the film, it's the role played by Brooke Bundy. It's somewhat cliched "farmer's daughter gets tempted" stuff, but Bundy does well with the role as written. All of the women in the film are well cast and poor Jacqueline Scott did deserve some additional screen time. I always liked her from her days of playing Richard Kimble's sister. Barbara Luna makes the most of her time and Inger Stevens gets a character with some shading and the way that she stands up to Fonda somewhat prefigures the climax.

 

Some may quibble that the two male leads are a bit too old, but I can let that go as this is the best of the three vehicles in which they both appeared. When not shot in close-up, Stewart still manages to make his a believable character and even at near 60, one could see that he was taking his own falls in the fight scene with Elam. So what if there are bags under his eyes, they're still the sparkling eyes that he always had, it was only shortly after that real-life tragedy became apparent in them. His son died in Viet Nam not long after and when he and Fonda met up again in THE CHEYENNE SOCIAL CLUB, Fonda looks ten years younger and Stewart appears a decade older.

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> The big surprise is the stellar work done by Robert Porter as the unfortunate Arthur. Porter had previously done an GUNSMOKE episode with the same director and it's a shame that we didn't hear much from him in the future.

>

 

I agree, he was very touching and I did nOT see it coming, what happened to him. That

was very tough to watch. He had an uncanny resemblance to James Dean, to me. I'm

sure I've seen the "Gunsmoke" epi he appeared in, but I don't remember it.

 

> Some may quibble that the two male leads are a bit too old, but I can let that go as this is the best of the three vehicles in which they both appeared. When not shot in close-up, Stewart still manages to make his a believable character and even at near 60, one could see that he was taking his own falls in the fight scene with Elam. So what if there are bags under his eyes, they're still the sparkling eyes that he always had, it was only shortly after that real-life tragedy became apparent in them. His son died in Viet Nam not long after and when he and Fonda met up again in THE CHEYENNE SOCIAL CLUB, Fonda looks ten years younger and Stewart appears a decade older.

 

Thanks for sharing that background---I knew Jimmy lost his son in the war but did not know the exact timing----and yes, he did age dramatically after that, poor thing. I agree that this was the best of the Fonda/Stewart pairings, by quite a stretch. Though they are cute in that early comedy they did.

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>>Though they are cute in that early comedy they did.

 

They did have the best segment of ON OUR MERRY WAY. It must have been a favor for former fellow Princeton Player Burgess Meredith that got them in the film.

 

Porter did resemble James Dean, but I can't say that I recall as much being made of that as it was for Michael Parks and Christopher Jones. Not that it did either of them much good.

 

Looking at the credits for FIRECREEK, I see that its writer Calvin Clements did 43 episodes of GUNSMOKE and quite a few RIFLEMAN and WAGON TRAIN episodes also. Other than KANSAS CITY BOMBER, this was his only feature film. Well, he rose to the occasion and getting William Clothier to shoot it had to be a coup.

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Selleck did several westerns for TNT in the late 90s. I don't know why he doesn't do more except he is having quite a successful run for CBS playing "Jesse Stone" as a Chief of Police in MA. My bride and I enjoy them very much. He is not unlike a cowboy. He has a past. He is plain spoken and a man of few words.

 

I suspect if he were to try and make another western, though age may be problem, he would have to do it for another network. Although, CBS isn't adverse to doing them but I guess only if there is some tie to "Lonesome Dove."

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>>I get the reluctant marshal up against the bad guys and fighting it out himself but is that enough to make the comparison?

 

I would think that would be enough, and certainly I'm not the only one to have noticed that over the last 42 years. But I would add to that the fact that a woman has a lot to do with the dispatch of a bad guy in both films as being another similarity. It is more the reluctant townspeople that bonds them than it is the reluctant peace officer. No matter what, that Gary Cooper will face down the gang is never really in question whereas in FIRECREEK we see Stewart trying to avoid a confrontation up until the point where his cowardice (and that of the rest of the town) causes the death of an innocent person who earlier tried to keep a gang member from assaulting a woman.

 

One could say that FIRECREEK somewhat could be considered an offshoot of HIGH NOON if we think of what would have happened in the earlier film if Kane had run away and the Miller gang decided to stay for a night before going after him.

 

However, as I said earlier, to me there are touches of HIGH NOON and a bit of another Fonda western WELCOME TO HARD TIMES in the film. Are they conscious "borrowings" - I can't say, and there are only so many plots to go around anyway. It's more a shorthand way of saying that if one thinks well of one of the earlier films, they may wish to check out this one.

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I had heard the comparison elsewhere so I didn't mean to lay it on you. You are right about the lady dispatching the bad guy but as they ladies couldn't be more different I missed that part of it. I was thinking there were more similarities than what I saw based on what I had read from other sources about the "High Noon" comparison.

 

I mentioned somewhere else it reminded me more of "Day Of The Outlaw."

 

Thanks.

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Howdy, Cowboy Chris -- Firecreek reminds me of High Noon and 3:10 to Yuma.

 

As Clore and you have mentioned, the High Noon side is the cowardice of a town to stand up to the "Larkins" and "Frank Millers" and their gangs of the world, leaving the job to just one man. You also have the female finale, as Clore wisely pointed out. You even have a "kid" being the one person who was willing to stand by the sheriff.

 

I really liked these words by Clore:

 

One could say that FIRECREEK somewhat could be considered an offshoot of HIGH NOON if we think of what would have happened in the earlier film if Kane had run away and the Miller gang decided to stay for a night before going after him.

 

That's perfectly said.

 

You could even say Meli (Barbara Luna) was the "Helen Ramirez" of Firecreek since Johnny (James Stewart) had a special reason to look out for her. Both were strong women, just in different ways. They had to look out for their "interests."

 

The reason I found Firecreek to be similar to 3:10 to Yuma was Johnny Cobb. He had let things just be, just as Dan Evans (Van Heflin) does in 3:10 to Yuma. He was taking what came his way, "settling." Eventually, he decides he must take a stand for something in life, even if the cost is his own life. Both Johnny and Dan have two young boys who they must set an example for.

 

Hopefully we can talk some Firecreek. It's a very underrated western. I'm amazed by the depth of character that's found in the film. It's quite the opposite of Day of the Outlaw, which I watched prior to it. That's a film that sorely lacks depth of character, except for Starrett (Robert Ryan) and Bruhn (Burl Ives).

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>>I really liked these words by Clore:

 

>>One could say that FIRECREEK somewhat could be considered an offshoot of HIGH NOON if we think of what would have happened in the earlier film if Kane had run away and the Miller gang decided to stay for a night before going after him.

 

>>That's perfectly said.

 

 

Well, thank you Frank. I liked these words of yours:

 

>>You could even say Meli (Barbara Luna) was the "Helen Ramirez" of Firecreek since Johnny (James Stewart) had a special reason to look out for her. Both were strong women, just in different ways. They had to look out for their "interests."

 

That hadn't occurred to me.

 

We could even consider Johnny Cobb to be the Herb character of HIGH NOON - the one to whom Kane said "Go home to your wife and kids." There's even a little bit of Ransom Stoddard of THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE in Cobb, and not just because both are James Stewart. Both take a while to get riled enough to realize that law and order may require the greatest sacrifice for the greatest good.

 

FIRECREEK is really a great example of the last gasp of the American western before the influences of Peckinpah and Leone created a whole new form. One could say that there is a Leone influence upon the film in the look of the town and its being so sparsely populated. It's not bright and pretty in its setting as were so many overly lighted 50s and 60s westerns. Walls don't look freshly painted and the street isn't some backlot set that had been used previously to shoot BONANZA or THE BIG VALLEY. The males don't appear to be costumed by Levi Straus and some of the shirts were the proper pullover kind that were prevalent in the period.

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> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}

> FIRECREEK is really a great example of the last gasp of the American western before the influences of Peckinpah and Leone created a whole new form. One could say that there is a Leone influence upon the film in the look of the town and its being so sparsely populated. It's not bright and pretty in its setting as were so many overly lighted 50s and 60s westerns. Walls don't look freshly painted and the street isn't some backlot set that had been used previously to shoot BONANZA or THE BIG VALLEY. The males don't appear to be costumed by Levi Straus and some of the shirts were the proper pullover kind that were prevalent in the period.

 

That's also an excellent point, clore, in this regard, I believe the movie benefits immensely from having such old-fashioned stars as Fonda and Stewart.

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Hi there, Clore -- Thank you for the complimentary words. I appreciate that.

 

We could even consider Johnny Cobb to be the Herb character of HIGH NOON - the one to whom Kane said "Go home to your wife and kids."

 

That's definitely who he was before Arthur's (Robert Porter) fate. The entire town is "Herb." As Whittier (Dean Jagger) says:

 

firecreek1.jpg

 

And that scene is one of the best in the film.

 

There's even a little bit of Ransom Stoddard of THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE in Cobb, and not just because both are James Stewart. Both take a while to get riled enough to realize that law and order may require the greatest sacrifice for the greatest good.

 

I definitely got a "Ranse Stoddard" feel with Johnny Cobb... at the very end. He came to the realization that he had to stand up for what's right. He's also too weak to really take out Larkin and all of his men. Just like Ranse, he gets a little help or he would have been a goner.

 

FIRECREEK is really a great example of the last gasp of the American western before the influences of Peckinpah and Leone created a whole new form.

 

That's a great point. It really does have a "traditional" western feel. It's a "Gunsmoke" western. And I do like that about it.

 

One could say that there is a Leone influence upon the film in the look of the town and its being so sparsely populated. It's not bright and pretty in its setting as were so many overly lighted 50s and 60s westerns. Walls don't look freshly painted and the street isn't some backlot set that had been used previously to shoot BONANZA or THE BIG VALLEY. The males don't appear to be costumed by Levi Straus and some of the shirts were the proper pullover kind that were prevalent in the period.

 

Now that's a terrific observation. It really did have a "Dollars" trilogy look. And funny you should mention Leone, because I also noticed a Leone influence with the score, particularly when Johnny returns to town, "the morning after."

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How do, Cowboy Chris -- I just have to think deeper. I guess I am looking more at comparisons at its most basic.

 

I think it's primarily how the town reacts and the ending that is most similar to High Noon. At the end, both Hadleyville and Firecreek become "ghost towns," yet are populated. The citizens are hiding in fear and cowardice.

 

Then you have four bad guys versus the hero amongst the town. A barn and the threat of fire plays a role in both films. Heck, even both guys really aren't the sheriff.

 

I think of High Noon as a film about marriage and community. Firecreek is definitely a film about community and where we fit in and what is sometimes asked and expected of us.

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>>I think of High Noon as a film about marriage and community. Firecreek is definitely a film about community and where we fit in and what is sometimes asked and expected of us.

 

If you think about it, there's only five years between FIRECREEK and HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER which is somewhat HIGH NOON as seen through the influence of Leone by way of Eastwood.

 

Again we get a town where the public is unwilling or unable to face the menace of the approaching outlaw gang headed by a man just released from prison. This won't be the only time that Eastwood reworked an earlier western as certainly PALE RIDER is dependent upon SHANE for its existence.

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FIRECREEK SPOILED

 

I had earlier mentioned the depth that's found in Firecreek, in both the story and its characters. Some characters are only given brief moments yet they actually make an impact.

 

In my recent viewing of Firecreek (my second overall), I came away being even more moved by Arthur (Robert Porter). Arthur is known as the town simpleton, yet like many "simpletons," he helps to remind us of how life is supposed to be. He looks to do good. He wishes to be a member of the community, a helpful one, a contributing one.

 

Arthur likes to do things for others. He wishes to be appreciated.

 

firecreek15.jpg

 

Arthur wishes to become a man, his own man. He's a "boy" with dreams.

 

firecreek11.jpg

 

firecreek12.jpg

 

Arthur then turns on himself. You get the feeling Society plays a hand in this, too.

 

firecreek13.jpg

 

firecreek14.jpg

 

Arthur ends up being a hero, as he comes to the rescue of Meli (Barbara Luna) as she's being raped by Drew (James Best). But just his luck and fate, he ends up accidentally killing Drew, which ultimately leads to his own demise. It's the perfect story arc for such a character.

 

The film has many nice little touches, but my favorite is that Arthur doesn't know his last name, so he comes to adopt the town as his last name. He is "Arthur Firecreek." The reason why I love this is because Arthur comes to represent the town. You get the feeling he has pride in his last name and his town. When he is hanged, the town is hanged.

 

I also love this:

 

firecreek8.jpg

 

Arthur has one true and loyal friend in this world and its his dog. He's by his side to the end.

 

firecreek9.jpg

 

Another nice little touch in the film are these two:

 

firecreek19.jpg

 

Why it's Marnie and her mother! Leah (Brooke Bundy) and her mother Dulcie (Louise Latham) are going through different feelings wihout a man in their life. Leah is seeking the attention of man and she is doing so recklessly. She's willing to give herself to any guy who wants her and buys her things. She's headed for serious trouble. And then there's Dulcie:

 

firecreek5.jpg

 

firecreek6.jpg

 

firecreek7.jpg

 

Dulcie has written off men. She doesn't trust them. She has fallen bitter. And this sets up one of my favorite moments of the film... which has nothing to do with the story at hand yet it has everything to do with it.

 

firecreek2.jpg

 

firecreek3.jpg

 

firecreek4.jpg

 

Dulcie's hearing how Johnny (James Stewart) feels about his wife hits her hard. She wishes a man would think that way about her. She's hurting, just as her daughter Leah is hurting. And, just as the lovely lady here is hurting:

 

firecreek23.jpg

 

Why it's Key Largo! Inger Stevens is wonderful in Firecreek. Her scenes with Henry Fonda are very powerful... and beautiful. They both understand the other and they are both attracted to the other because of their longings. Here again, we are introduced to a character, Evelyn (Inger Stevens), who is seemingly ancillary yet comes to represent the entire story of Firecreek, the town and film. Amazing.

 

firecreek24.jpg

 

I love it when Johnny says this:

 

firecreek21.jpg

 

firecreek22.jpg

 

The first delivery is said to himself. The second (and third) is said to the town. The guilt is felt by all.

 

And, boy, doesn't this seem to be always relevant?:

 

firecreek20.jpg

 

firecreek16.jpg

 

Was there ever a more important badge to wear than this one?

 

firecreek18.jpg

 

firecreek17.jpg

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I wanted Shea to say "Charlie Brown."

 

Great comments on the film. One thing you touched on that I liked is Dulcie's reaction to Johnny's comments about his wife. She is a hard woman. She does things out of obligation. She certainly tries to dissuade her daughter from getting involved with any man much less the men that came to town. But that look you posted when she sits down next to Johnny's wife. She is sad and, I think, a little bit guilty. She has been hurt so all men must be like that. There is a deeper story there.

 

Arthur is the heart, as you say. He wants to make something of himself which is ironic because the town full of normal people seem to be incapable of it. Arthur is not kidding himself though. He knows his limitations but that doesn't stop him from doing the right thing when he sees it. Johnny respects him.

 

Inger Stevens is a fish out of water here. She may be the toughest person in town. I am sure she is only there to take care of her father. There probably is some past there but I think she just hates being there. That is what makes her verbal sparring with Fonda so interesting. At the same time she is angered by him she is fascinated by him. Somebody to match wits with. Though she may find him compelling she is not so over run that she can;t do the right thing.

 

One other thing is that my DVD looked gorgeous on my screen. I have an upconvert DVD player but it is a regular DVD. Beautiful scenery.

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Wonderful discussion on FIRECREEK, gentlemen!

 

> I had earlier mentioned the depth that's found in Firecreek, in both the story and its characters. Some characters are only given brief moments yet they actually make an impact.

>

 

This really struck me on my last viewing, too---especially the prevalence of female

characters of all kinds, something unusual for westerns in general.

 

> In my recent viewing of Firecreek (my second overall), I came away being even more moved by Arthur (Robert Porter). Arthur is known as the town simpleton, yet like many "simpletons," he helps to remind us of how life is supposed to be. He looks to do good. He wishes to be a member of the community, a helpful one, a contributing one.

>

> Arthur likes to do things for others. He wishes to be appreciated.

>

 

I love Arthur. You described him and his dreams beautifully and picked

the perfect screencaps. See how the dog is his best "friend" and it

shows how tied in he is to the essential, just like children are. He can

see into people like kids and animals.

 

> Arthur wishes to become a man, his own man. He's a "boy" with dreams.

>

 

I love that about him, he is the only one there with real potential, he

could represent what the town could be, in fact, he is the only one

that believes in Firecreek or who doesn't see it as a mangy, worthless

place. Just as the townspeople gave up on Firecreek and see none

of its potential to become a real community, they also view Arthur

the same way.

 

He thinks he can make his dreams come true there whereas

everyone else kind of sees it as a nightmare.

 

> Arthur then turns on himself. You get the feeling Society plays a hand in this, too.

>

 

Yes, Jimmy is the only one who kind of treats him well.

 

> Arthur ends up being a hero, as he comes to the rescue of Meli (Barbara Luna) as she's being raped by Drew (James Best). But just his luck and fate, he ends up accidentally killing Drew, which ultimately leads to his own demise. It's the perfect story arc for such a character.

>

 

I just hate what happens to him, it's so horrible. The "Indian" woman is raped

and the innocent boy/man is murdered for trying to save her. It's kind of a

whole snapshot of society and human history.

 

 

> The film has many nice little touches, but my favorite is that Arthur doesn't know his last name, so he comes to adopt the town as his last name. He is "Arthur Firecreek." The reason why I love this is because Arthur comes to represent the town. You get the feeling he has pride in his last name and his town. When he is hanged, the town is hanged.

>

 

there you go, you said it better than I could.

 

>

> Why it's Marnie and her mother! Leah (Brooke Bundy) and her mother Dulcie (Louise Latham) are going through different feelings wihout a man in their life. Leah is seeking the attention of man and she is doing so recklessly. She's willing to give herself to any guy who wants her and buys her things. She's headed for serious trouble. And then there's Dulcie:

>

 

Great comparison! Louise definitely was channeling her Marnie experience, ha! And Dulcie does look to "take things" from men. :D

 

> Dulcie has written off men. She doesn't trust them. She has fallen bitter. And this sets up one of my favorite moments of the film... which has nothing to do with the story at hand yet it has everything to do with it.

 

I missed that moment, thank you for pointing it out because that is terrific.

I have to say, this is one of the best westerns for showing off female roles.

 

>

> Why it's Key Largo! Inger Stevens is wonderful in Firecreek. Her scenes with Henry Fonda are very powerful... and beautiful. They both understand the other and they are both attracted to the other because of their longings. Here again, we are introduced to a character, Evelyn (Inger Stevens), who is seemingly ancillary yet comes to represent the entire story of Firecreek, the town and film. Amazing.

>

 

Lol! Another good comparison! Though Inger has gone through a lot,

she shows how hard that kind of life back then could be on women.

Because it is not just that her lover died, but she seems to resent

the harshness of her life. I don't know how she got to be so well

spoken, though, and seemingly very poised, so much so I wonder why

she doesn't move her father and herself out of Firecreek. Also,

I want to know who does her hair. :D

 

 

> The first delivery is said to himself. The second (and third) is said to the town. The guilt is felt by all.

>

 

Good call!

 

> Was there ever a more important badge to wear than this one?

>

 

I thought that was so sweet. Wow, how those two sons of Johnny's must

really look at their father in a whole new light after all the events. :)

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Frank, I haven't even seen more than the first five minutes of the movie yet, but your caps (especially the ones about the badge) made me cry!

 

Nice job, boys. You've made me want to see the rest of the movie even more.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 14, 2010 11:46 AM

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Howdy, Movieman -- I wanted Shea to say "Charlie Brown."

 

Now that you mention it, I want him to say it!

 

One thing you touched on that I liked is Dulcie's reaction to Johnny's comments about his wife. She is a hard woman. She does things out of obligation. She certainly tries to dissuade her daughter from getting involved with any man much less the men that came to town. But that look you posted when she sits down next to Johnny's wife. She is sad and, I think, a little bit guilty. She has been hurt so all men must be like that. There is a deeper story there.

 

That was wonderful. I really like your comment about Dulcie doing things out of obligation. That's right on.

 

For such a small character in a story, you really feel Dulcie. She fits the entire theme of Firecreek, both town and film. And to give her such a moment... wow. It's very good writing. Why is it so important for us to feel for Dulcie? She's not involved in the main story at hand. But really, she is. Everyone in the town is.

 

Arthur is the heart, as you say. He wants to make something of himself which is ironic because the town full of normal people seem to be incapable of it. Arthur is not kidding himself though. He knows his limitations but that doesn't stop him from doing the right thing when he sees it. Johnny respects him.

 

In a way, the "normal people" are doing just as Arthur is doing. They are fooling themselves. They may hope and dream to get out of their rut, their depression, their fear, but they eventually come back to "I can't." I think most of us can relate to this. I know I can. I'd be mayor of Firecreek.

 

Inger Stevens is a fish out of water here. She may be the toughest person in town.

 

I'd say she is the toughest, but she's still like the rest.

 

I am sure she is only there to take care of her father. There probably is some past there but I think she just hates being there.

 

Larkin (Fonda) pretty much pegged her. She's buried herself in Firecreek. She's "dead," on the inside. Ironically, Larkin stirs her, makes her feel alive again. I believe everyone wants to live and be alive, it's just we don't always know how to make this happen for ourselves. We often need another person(s) to awaken us.

 

That is what makes her verbal sparring with Fonda so interesting. At the same time she is angered by him she is fascinated by him. Somebody to match wits with.

 

Very much so. You get the feeling she hasn't been around a man since her "friend" was killed. She "died" with him. Larkin talks to Evelyn, challenges Evelyn, forces her to see herself, forces her to "undress" before him. She hates him for this and loves him for this. You also get the feeling she is longing to be a man's woman. She seems to take great joy in tending to Larkin. It's what she's desiring and dearly missing in her life. There's both male and female pride to be found in this film, and how the two conjoin.

 

Though she may find him compelling she is not so over run that she can;t do the right thing.

 

That's correct. She's isn't blind to the truth about Larkin. In fact, she never was.

 

One other thing is that my DVD looked gorgeous on my screen. I have an upconvert DVD player but it is a regular DVD. Beautiful scenery.

 

It does look pretty sharp. I never truly know how a DVD looks until I take screen caps. That's where I really notice the transfer.

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How do, Denver -- Frank, I haven't even seen more than the first five minutes of the movie yet, but your caps (especially the ones about the badge) made me cry!

 

:) I hope you do get the chance to watch it. There's a lot to be found in Firecreek. I believe you will be moved by it, on many different levels.

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Howdy, Bad Hat! Maybe I can get to it tonight.

 

Everything you guys have said about it leads me to believe that there is a lot for me in this movie .... and I do love strong female characters in westerns.

 

I was already getting a feeling from the beginning of the film that it was to be a slow spiral downward for Jimmy Stewart and the rest of the town. It seemed very realistic to me. You think that bad things will just go away if you ignore them. Then you try a little bit here and a little bit there instead of just doing what needs to be done, make excuses for NOT doing anything.....when it comes down to the nitty gritty, you shy away, thinking someone else will take care of it or worse, make excuses for inaction. It's easier to keep spiralling rather than to break out of your torpor and go a different direction that is unknown. That spiral is at least comfortable....

 

Thanks to movieman for alerting me... I would never have realized it was on if you hadn't brought up the movie in the first place.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 14, 2010 12:33 PM

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Howdy, Bad Hat!

 

Who are you talking to?! This is Layne! I'm wearing a white hat, as always. That should prove, once and for all, that I'm a gentleman.

 

Maybe I can get to it tonight.

 

I hope you do. I really liked it after I first watched it, about five years ago. I rewatched it for the first time just a few days ago, and it was even better the second time because I have a better grasp of classic film, now. I enjoyed the women in the film a lot more, this time.

 

Everything you guys have said about it leads me to believe that there is a lot for me in this movie .... and I do love strong female characters in westerns.

 

You're gonna get a nice mix of women in the film. They don't dominate the screen, but their moments are powerful. I'm sure you will like Fonda and Inger's scenes. I also liked Henrietta's (Jacqueline Scott) talk to Johnny (James Stewart). And you also get to see Miss G in action! That alone is worth the price of admission.

 

I was already getting a feeling from the beginning of the film that it was to be a slow spiral downward for Jimmy Stewart and the rest of the town. It seemed very realistic to me. You think that bad things will just go away if you ignore them. Then you try a little bit here and a little bit there instead of just doing what needs to be done, make excuses for NOT doing anything.....when it comes down to the nitty gritty, you shy away, thinking someone else will take care of it or worse, make excuses for inaction. It's easier to keep spiralling rather than to break out of your torpor and go a different direction that is unknown. That spiral is at least comfortable....

 

Geez, that was excellent and you have only seen five minutes of the film. I'm confident you will notice a similarity between Firecreek and...

 

My favorite scene is the one between Johnny and Whittier (Dean Jagger). Lots of hard truths are spoken in the film. Lots of medicine is being swallowed.

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