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Western Movie Rambles


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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

 

> Thanks, it's nice to be on the trail again, at least for a little while. :)

 

I hope for more than a little...

 

 

> I did not know about Tom Mix, I think I just figured he was a Hollywood cowboy

> from the start.

 

He is very cloudy for me - some say he was a rancher, and others say he was in the Wild West Show. Maybe he did both? I know next to nothing about him, but he did seem VERY Hollywood to me. Maybe he was the real thing, but glamorized it? That would actually be kinda cool....

 

 

> How cute!! I NEVER would have imagined that kind of background for Elizabeth's Mom!

> Ha! I think I now know where Elizabeth got her spunk. ;)

 

I have had to read that article over and over just to imagine it! Every time I read it, I am surprised. I still can't picture it.

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The 101 Ranch story would make a good movie, if it weren't so sad

 

That was a VERY sad tale. For all the thrills and excitement of the wild west shows they must have produced.. it was a very sad end to it all. You are right, it would make a good movie. (sometimes the sad stories do)

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Being a true son of the old west, {that's old west boy} and having watched too many of the great western buckeroos ,I would never attempt to deprive a Lady of any treasure she might want, so I would bow to her request especially if the cowgirl was Izcutter.

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> Being a true son of the old west, {that's old west boy} and having watched too many of the great western buckeroos ,I would never attempt to deprive a Lady of any treasure she might want, so I would bow to her request especially if the cowgirl was Izcutter.

 

You are a true gentleman, fredb! :x

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*Being a true son of the old west, {that's old west boy} and having watched too many of the great western buckeroos ,I would never attempt to deprive a Lady of any treasure she might want, so I would bow to her request especially if the cowgirl was Izcutter.*

 

Ah, Fredb, our love of the old west and western movies continues on! Right back 'atcha, pardner!

 

I've got *Colorado Territory*, *Will Penny* and *Monte Walsh* on the tivo to watch next weekend. Maybe we can get some good jawin' going after I've had a chance to see them again!

 

Looking forward to it!

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Love them all, "Colorado Territory" holds a special place for me. That's when I first fell in LUST with Virginia Mayo . To an 8 year old in 1949 to see her on the big screen, Boy, was she HOT and I didn't even know what Hot was back then. All I remember was my "Milk Duds" started to melt...Ah memories. The other two are really wonderful Westerns also, but no Virginia.......

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Virginia was a truly beautiful woman who could act and proved it in many films She had a flair for comedy and musicals { even though she was dubbed in them } and she could hold her own with the best of them as she proved in the two you mentioned. She was a Goldwyn Girl, appeared with Danny Kaye in a number of his comedies.Supposedly the "Sultan of Morocco" in the 1940's stated that her beauty was proof of the existence of God.

I was also a fan of her husband Michael O'Shea whose film career never really took off, but in most of his films he was very good. "Lady of Burlesque" with Stanwyck where he played the comic and his lead role in "Jack London" {where he met Virginia} was quite good. The story is after he retired in the 50's he became a plainclothes operative for the CIA, what ever that is, he died of a heart attack at age 64. Him and Virginia had one daughter...

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fred and Iz: Now I know why I love you two so much: You have excellent taste in Western movies. I know this because we like the same ones and my taste, of course, is impeccable.

 

Just kidding. I am a Bogey fan but would rather see the Joel/Virginia version of the High Sierra than his. The first time I saw it, when I was 16, I liked it because of Virginia's character. She was the real "lady" as her feelings were honest and real rather than rather than phony like Dorothy Malone's Rose. I guess there was no other ending possible as they were outlaws but they died having known love.

 

I wrote about Monte Walsh the other day in a thread in General Discussions. I wish I had been able to see Will Penny and will definitely get to it the next time I can. If you two like it, that's enough for me. My only gripe is that the scenery would have been breathtaking in color but that's the only one.

 

fred, Encore has been running The Iron Mistress this month. Your lady is in glorious color and at her nastiest. They've been running another one she did with Alan Ladd about the founding of Abilene, also in color. The most G-rated thing I can say is "Enjoy your fantasy".

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The film was a major disappointment for me. I loved the book so much and when the film came out I was ready for a slam bang story of Jim Bowie. Though Alan Ladd was a fine Bowie and Virginia was, well, not very likable .But what a letdown. The story of Jim Bowie and no battle of the Alamo.A couple of good knife fights, but at the end of the film************SPOILER ALERT********* He throws his famous knife into the Mississippi River.......PLEASE. The book was a wonderful read by a wonderful writer of western novels. I've discussed him before, Paul I. Wellman. A great many of his books were made into films with big stars like John Wayne, Glenn Ford.....

But Virginia does look wonderful as a Southern Belle.........

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Jun 19, 2010 3:39 AM

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fred: You might also like The Tempered Blade by Monte Barrett that was the source for the Scott Forbes series from the 50's about Bowie. While I'm guessing the Sybil character is fictional most of the Mexican part of his life seems to follow history. It's also a good read.

 

I just realized I was a bit unclear talking about Colorado Territory. That was the b&w movie I wished was in color as mountains, both green and Southwest earth tones are beautiful to me. I am a misplaced Florida beach bunny who is really a mountain goat. I've spent time in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas where they're part of the landscape and I loved all of it.

 

Edited by: wouldbestar on Jun 19, 2010 12:20 PM

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"Colorado Territory" is one of those films that when I first saw it as a 8 year old I could have sworn it was in color. But years later I was surprised that it was b&w. The same with "Yankee Doodle Dandy". When I was working on the Warners albums in "73 and we pulled the 16mm print of "YDD" and it was b&w, even my film editor was surprised that it was not in color. We remembered it as a color film and I guess there are certain movies that stick in your mind when you first see them and years later you're surprised they are b&w....

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You did what at Warners? I did not know you were ever in the entertainment business. That explains your wealth of knowledge. I know their bios say Izcutter and CeneMaven make them I'm curious to see some of their work or know if I already have. That goes for anyone else I enjoy posting with. Are you all allowed to toot your own horns or is that considered using the posts for personal gains?

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I love this movie but have one question. Despite what Steve Leach thought, Jim McKay was never lost; he did on land what he did at sea following the direction of the stars in the sky. Seamen have been doing this since they've been around and I thought land explorers did the same. Cowboys didn't do this on the range or on cattle drives? How about Indian scouts? If the answers are no, this is quite a revelation for me.

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You guys may not be as crazy as you thought. For a short time there, there was a rash of coloring of B&W movies. They colored *Casablanca, It's a Wonderful Life,* and countless others. Someone thought it would interest more people if they cold see the oldies in color, so that's what they did. You may all have seen one of these colored versions previously on TV.

 

The reverse was fun for me for a while, and others like me who have been watching TV since it was a little 10" round screen in black and white. I saw a lot of movies on TV in the afternoons and on the weekend when I was 7 through 12 on B&W TVs. So imagine my surprise and pleasure when getting ready to watch something like *The Barkleys of Broadway* and it appears in full color.

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The colorizing of old B&W films hit in the mid '80's.Ted Turner was a big proponent of the process with his vast library of old films.Some were in favor of the colorizing such as Cary Grant and Frank Capra. Others like Jimmy Stewart, Woody Allen were against it.... John Huston and Orson Welles instituted lawsuits against colorizing their films. Gladly they stopped pushing colorization But the films I was referring to I though were in color was long before then .A simple trick of the mind and memory of long ago, but you make a good point regarding the old film after the 1980's.

BTW,FYI ,"The Barkleys of Broadway" was a Technicolor film, the only one Fred and Ginger did in color.

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I only saw Colorado Territory about six months ago, on TCM, so it was not the colorized version. But it is funny - to me it was vividly, blazingly in color.

 

I think I just couldn't remember Virginia Mayo in anything else but technicolor. It suited her so. :D

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I'm such a slacker as I only now finished "Hell's Hinges." What started out as an intense drama that just happens to be a western finishes as only a western could. It has a bit of everything. There is some humor, action, redemption and some pretty good acting. (Maybe even the first curse word 23 years before Mr Gable uttered his line.) Hart, I thought, was one of the few that weren't too broad in their approach. Some things were done for the sake of time. The sister turns Hart into a pussycat in less than two minutes. The preacher seems alcoholic after one night. And so on.

 

What was interesting and troubling at the same time was the lengths a town would go to destroy not only a man but a town's faith. You'd think they would have just ignored him. It's not even enough to ruin his reputation they have to rid the town of any trace of God. In the end they have revenge exacted on them.

 

The climax was really exciting. Hart as avenger. He not only comes after the town for what they did to the preacher but God himself has been insulted and he can't have that. In his wake the town is gone. No grace, no mercy except most of the people are spared. It was visually striking.

 

I wish I could play piano like that.

 

Thanks for bringing it to our attention. Maybe "Tunbleweeds" tomorrow.

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Good golly, Mr. Movieman..

 

You are far from SLACKING. (I mean.. do the words "Programming Challenge ring any bells?? ha. You've been a busy guy! I mean it is not like you are the SHIFTLESS one around here.. HA!) :P

 

Glad you got to see this one all the way through.

 

What was interesting and troubling at the same time was the lengths a town would go to destroy not only a man but a town's faith

 

That part of the movie actually reminded me a bit of the town in a book by Frank Peretti called The Oath... one of the most creepy books I ever read (but a great allegory about how sin can take over and consume a human heart) ANYWAY I remember thinking that as I was watching it all play out.

 

(And PS: the book is NOTHING like this film at all, by the way... except in the early part of the story where the entire town.. I think every single citizen except the preacher, has the mindset that the folks in Hell's Hinges.. And OH do they all pay a price for it in the end.. (did I mention it was a creepy book, ha.. but a VERY good story) And you are right.. Troubling is a great word for it.

 

At any rate.. that is what I remember thinking about this part of the story as I was watching.

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SPOILERS

 

>The climax was really exciting. Hart as avenger. He not only comes after the town for what they did to the preacher but God himself has been insulted and he can't have that. In his wake the town is gone. No grace, no mercy except most of the people are spared. It was visually striking.

 

The way you described the ending was spot on, movieman. The movie could have been very pedestrian, the good guys win, the town is saved. I found the climax of the film to be awe inducing. What I was not expecting was the level of wrath, the lack of mercy. Nothing but dust left..... nothing to show that a town had ever been there. Pretty powerful stuff for a short film from 1916.

 

I loved the piano score.

 

On another note, I watched Tumbleweeds and absolutely loved it, maybe because I wasn't expecting much. It doesn't stick in your memory like Hell's Hinges, but what I do remember most about it was the rousing action, the brisk pacing, and the cinematography - there was shot after shot that took my breath away. It was fascinating to me that they didn't even have to travel to make this film... California at that time was so unspoiled. Santa Clarita is 32 miles northwest of Los Angeles! :D

 

I liked the scope of the movie, and I gotta say that the scene with Hart riding his faithful Fritz across miles of countryside to reach the ranch in time was breathtaking! When you realize Hart's age at the time of this film (he was not a young man), it is really great to me the way he presented such an intriguing and youthful character - yes, maybe this cowman was past his prime, but he was still a good leading man. One thing about westerns - men only get better with age. There is none of this cult of youth in a western ( except for maybe young guns). Maybe that is why I have become partial to westerns and western actors. Because they are MEN, not boys. They are tested and tried, and found to be true.

 

I want to post some caps but don't have time now. I'll be back later. :D

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I watched "Tumbleweeds" this morning. I liked it was well. One thing about Hart is that if they can call Keaton "The Great Stone Face" he runs a close second. The boyish good looks of "Hell's Hinges" are barely there but they do come across now and then. Overall I like him here. He is still a tough guy that goes to mush as soon as he meets a pretty girl but after that he is still the toughest man around.

 

Beautiful cinematography. The first shot that caught me was early on when the homesteaders are coming to town and they comment on the passing of the west. There is a shot of the five men on a ridge in shadow all with their hats off as paying respect for a friend who has died. Beautifully done.

 

I wouldn't say the land rush is as good as "The Iron Horse" but it is exciting. As beautiful as watching Hart ride through the rest of the crowd it is a bit of a stretch to think that he could start that late, run the horse that hard for that long past that many people and live to tell about it. It was a sight though.

 

A good supporting cast with a pretty good back story. Some humor thrown in for good measure and you have a fun 90 minutes.

 

I saw the DVD that has Hart's "Farewell Address." While heartfelt it seems way over the top. I kept thinking why couldn't he deliver it the way he acted. It is good to hear his voice.

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