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Western Movie Rambles


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I was amazed to see Melvyn in BILLY BUDD. He was extremely good as the old sail-maker. Had a Scandinavian accent, and was very believable.

Ha! I like Ileana Douglas, she's got a great sense of humor (there's an espresso machine I've been meaning to buy from Ikea) Ever since I saw Ileana do an intro to MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE, where she perceptively honed in on the cozy, post-war, nostalgic feel to the film, I've really appreciated her. And of course, her granddad is wonderful in it. "Bill Cole, friend of the family...."

 

I like the way John Belushi "sings" Louie, Louie in ANIMAL HOUSE, ha!

 

I had an Uncle Harold from Queens as well. Everyone called him Heshey. No one knows why. He looked like a 6 ft. Wally Cox.

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> {quote:title=kingrat wrote:}{quote}

> Bronxie, I'm with you 100% about Melvyn Douglas in NINOTCHKA where his sex appeal seems, like, non-existent. Seriously damages the film.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like the way Melvyn takes an amiable 'back seat" to Cary's potent physical charms, in BLANDINGS. Myrna: "You'll be just as pure as the driven snow in the morning." Melvyn: "That's the story of my life".

>

> A friend of mine used to say that "Butterfly Morning" had the fewest lyrics of any song he'd ever heard. Yep, I remember it. Not necessarily fondly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just the title alone "Butterfly Morning" (ugh, I can hardly type it even) would make me not want to hear it, but of course I was already deep into the story, and then it popped up....

>

> Have to admit I'm not a big fan of Jason Robards, Jr., mainly because I first saw him as Brutus in the Stuart Burge film of JULIUS CAESAR. He seems to be hungover and reading his lines off cue cards. This image was hard to shake. Later I discovered that he was very good in LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. He's not bad in THE BALLAD OF CABLE HOGUE, but not my idea of a romantic lead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I saw snippets of JULIUS CAESAR and agree that Jason seemed a bit sluggish. (however, Chuck Heston I thought was extremely good as Antony) Most people's perceptions of Robards probably start at LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, if they've been lucky enough to have it as their first exposure to this gifted actor. He's brilliant in that part. One thing, however, I never cared for, is his very distinctive laugh -- it seems to be a part of every performance, and it always gets on my nerves. He probably didn't chortle in JULIUS CAESAR, though, lol. At least, I hope not. I love him in THE BALLAD OF CABLE HOGUE more than I do the film itself. He's scruffily sexy, and I cared about his character.

I adore Jason in A THOUSAND CLOWNS. Check that one out. You can skip MAX DUGAN RETURNS, in my opinion.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Aug 16, 2010 10:41 PM

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Here's my highly stupid addition to the Jason Robards fest - I absolutely loved him in "Something Wicked This Way Comes", as the supposedly weak and aging father who must fight the Devil for his son's soul. Of course, I love Jonathan Pryce's Devil too.

 

And Robards was always good in the plays done on PBS - O'Neill with the great Colleen Dewhurst, and his turn in You Can't Take it With You.

 

I agree about the very phoney laugh, but who's counting? Everything else is tremendous.

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A bunch of us saw "Something Wicked This Way Comes." I've always liked that title;as I LOVE the title "The Macomber Affair." Don't ask me why...I just love saying it. Unfortunately, neither one of those are Westerns. I saw Colleen Dewhurst once on Broadway and 43rd Street. Her auburn hair blazed in the sun. And she looked so tough and sexy. (Great voice, too!!) Gone too soon.

 

"I had an Uncle Harold from Queens as well. Everyone called him Heshey. No one knows why. He looked like a 6 ft. Wally Cox.

 

Six feet? Whew! That's a lot of Wally Cox.

 

Awwwrighty I know I know...go to bed, C-Mave.

 

Edited by: CineMaven on Aug 17, 2010 1:55 AM - after re-reading over my post, I thought I'd better add "Wally" as an adjective.

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*"Something Wicked This Way Comes."*

 

Oh yes, yes, it does.

 

And you thought the evil was just Jonathan Pryce.

 

Welcome to where the evil never sleeps.

 

Gloria doesn't call it "the biggest evil ever" for nothing.

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Here's my highly stupid addition to the Jason Robards fest - I absolutely loved him in "Something Wicked This Way Comes", as the supposedly weak and aging father who must fight the Devil for his son's soul. Of course, I love Jonathan Pryce's Devil too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Would you believe I've never seen that? Oooh, thanks for mentioning it! "Highly stupid" my Aunt Fanny.

 

A girlfriend and I, years ago when I lived in Los Angeles, loved Jason as a down-and-out horror film star in the little known FOOLS, with Katherine Ross. We had such a crush on Robards in this performance, but you know what? I can't even remember it now! I don't know why, I really don't.

>

> And Robards was always good in the plays done on PBS - O'Neill with the great Colleen Dewhurst, and his turn in You Can't Take it With You.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The only O'Neill I've seen him do is on screen with LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. Ralph Richardson is phenomenal as the penny-pinching father.

>

> I agree about the very phoney laugh, but who's counting? Everything else is tremendous.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's true.

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I swear, the combo of Dewhurst and Robards was killer.... and you think at some points they COULD kill one another.... but their volatility was fantastic to watch.

 

I am so jealous of you Maven, Colleen was one of my very favorite actresses.

 

I had a crush on Jonathan Pryce in SWTWC as the Devil. He was so evil! Luckily, I don't have the same feelings about the real life counterpart. Blecch!

 

 

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I don't remember the movie very clearly, but I do see James Stacey in the film. (He was married to Connie Stevens and lost some limbs in a horrific motorcycle accident). Might be worth another look some time.

 

With Dewhurst, don't be jealous, Jackay. I didn't talk to her or anything...I just saw her pass by me. The only time I saw her very frightened in the movies was in "When A Stranger Calls" which was a fantastic film. She was a great theatre actress.

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That's funny, I was just thinking about that James Stacy character - wondering how they cast him.... and if he was an actor before he played this part.... I am glad he got such a nice role after his accident.

 

The movie is pretty good. It was made by Disney before their resurgence as a power, probably at their lowest point, business wise. So it still has a little of the feel of the old Disney movies, like Scarecrow of Romney Marsh, but it is more modern in using the CGI stuff. Luckily, there is very little special effects, and it is not at all overpowering. It is a great script, with a very dark subject - and a truly superb cast. I really like it a lot.

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*That's funny, I was just thinking about that James Stacy character - wondering how they cast him.... and if he was an actor before he played this part.... I am glad he got such a nice role after his accident*.

 

He was the prodigal son returned home in the TV western *Lancer* and was a very popular actor on a variety of tv series before his accident.

 

After the accident, *Posse* and *This Way Something Wicked Comes* are the highlights and then his life spiraled down into tragedy and scandal.

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While Bradbury's book is a brilliant piece of moral ideology, Disney's film was a rough ride for me, due to the poor screenplay (which Bradbury adapted) and the way the film was altered from the book (the ending did not make any sense from my perspective). Nevertheless, the performances are extremely well done and Pryce deserved an Oscar nomination at the very least for what he was able to achieve. Pam Grier was also great as the Dust Witch .

 

This scene copies the book pretty much word for word and Pryce is everything Mr. Dark should be:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmRdHVkqS_k

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Like you I loved the book and was excited when the film opened. However the excitement soon died down. Even though Bradbury did the screen play,Disney made many changes that Bradbury and director Jack Clayton did not agree to..Following a poor test screening, Disney pulled the film for a year and did reediting and added special effects,but the result was the same. The movie was a box office flop.Bradbury said the original screenplay was the best of his novels to screen, but with Disney reediting and messing with the screenplay, it was not the movie he had wanted to make...

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Aug 19, 2010 2:16 AM

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I haven't read the book, and after reading your posts I guess I should hightail it to the bookstore to get a copy! Because I enjoyed the movie a great deal despite the flaws.

 

However, most of the enjoyment is indeed in the performances. *Jonathan Pryce* is sublime, he alone is worth watching the film for. He is the embodiment of temptation and evil. I would follow him anywhere, and I KNOW who he is!

 

Robards somehow manages to play weak and boring, and then pulls off a wonderful transformation. The kids are pretty darn good too. I can only imagine how good the movie would have been if Disney had not messed with it, dumbing it down. Thank goodness they were working with a top notch story, because that wonderful idea still comes through. So even if the movie is a two and a half star, as opposed to the possible four star it might have been, it's worth looking at.

 

and Pam Grier is AMAZING as the dust witch. Whew! Is it hot in here?

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"Bradbury said the original screenplay was the best of his novels to screen, but with Disney reediting and messing with the screenplay, it was not the movie he had wanted to make..."

 

Aaaaaah the Suits, the Suits; those illustrious Executive Suits. I can't imagine how many

screenplays they have destroyed under the guise of "...knowing what the audience wants."

It must be even worse to have read the book and then seen the film. Those who cannot

create...destroy.

 

Egads!!!

 

Jackaaaay...Pam Grier always makes it hot. Hmmm...what if she had played the wife,

Bellamy wanted back in "The Professionals." NOT that there's anything wrong with

Claudia Cardinale, mind you.

 

Say Arkadin...how's the l'il shaver?? :D

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> I swear, the combo of Dewhurst and Robards was killer.... and you think at some points they COULD kill one another.... but their volatility was fantastic to watch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, yes, what an O'Neill pair! But then, I get frightened by Dewhurst as Marilla in ANNE OF GREEN GABLES. There's just something so intimidating about her in general...

 

> I had a crush on Jonathan Pryce in SWTWC as the Devil. He was so evil! Luckily, I don't have the same feelings about the real life counterpart. Blecch!

>

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I grew up with Ray Bradbury (not literally of course) but I've never seen SWTWC.

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I think the reason I always loved Dewhurst is that she was so formidable..... and being looked over a lot of the time, I wanted to be just like her..... and that's pretty much as far away from my own character as possible. :D

 

Marilla is wonderful - I love how cold she is, but then the fire and wamth underneath - I can't think of another actress who could play her.

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Oh my goodness! I just watched a "western" that had me bawling like

I haven't over a movie in a long, long time. It's 1936's Trail of the

Lonesome Pine, from the director of The Shepherd of the Hills and

it takes us to the same territory as that later film, with a couple of the same

principal performers.

 

At first, I thought, "oh, this is a warm-up for The Shepherd of the Hills",

but oh boy, DON'T sell it short. Stick with it because even though many

of the themes are just the same and the two films are almost siblings,

it has it's own emotional punch. It lacks the mythical dimensions of

the later film but it has plenty of heartwrenching human situations. The

cast is just as compelling as the later film, though it lacks the mediating

character of Harry Carey, jr. And it's just as beautifully photographed.

I mean GORGEOUS.

 

It's available to rent at Netflix, if any are of a mind. I'm going to buy

a copy of the DVD, I'm so enthusiastic about this film. In fact, I want

to read the book it's based on, a novel just as famous in its day

as TSOTH was.

 

Here it is at Netflix:

http://www.netflix.com/WiMovie/The_Trail_of_the_Lonesome_Pine/70118323?strackid=3a63768f650bae85_0_srl&strkid=935540675_0_0&trkid=438381

 

vlcsnap-00110.jpg?t=1282361447

 

vlcsnap-00111.jpg?t=1282361479

 

vlcsnap-00112.jpg?t=1282361502

 

vlcsnap-00113.jpg?t=1282361526

 

vlcsnap-00114.jpg?t=1282361550

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"From the director of The Shepard of the Hills"

 

That is Henry Hathaway. One of the most prolific directors in Hollywood and director of some of the finest films ever made. A man who doesn't get the credit he deserves. People know Ford, Hawks, Capra, Wellman and many others. But Hathaway gets lost some times in the kudos being given to the others. He worked as a propman in the late teens along with another propman, a young fellow named John Ford. He worked as an Assistant director to Josef von Sternberg, Victor Fleming and William K. Howard. He directed his first film in 1932, a Zane Grey western "Hertiage of the Desert, it was Randolph {chorus please } Scotts first leading role. He directed his last film in 1974. In those 42 years as a no nonsense director, some called him a tyrant and a screamer plus a few other things, he turned out some of the best Hollywood had to offer..

He directed some of the biggest and best of Hollywoods elite:From John Wayne's "Shepard of the Hills","Legend of the Lost", "North to Alaska", "Circus World", "Sons of Katie Elder" and "True Grit" to Mae West, Gary Cooper, James Cagney, Dana Andrews, Victor Mature, Richard Widmark, Marilyn Monroe, Susan Hayward,Tyrone Power, Sophia Loren, Burt Lancaster,Dean Martin and Gregory Peck to name a few.

He pioneered the "Semidocumentery" film style starting with "The House on 92nd St","Call Northside777" and the classic "Kiss of Death"

Some others he directed were:

Trail of the Lonesome Pine

Sundown

Wing and a Prayer

13 Rue Madaline

The Black Rose

The Desert Fox

Prince Valiant

Garden of Evil

How the West Was Won

Like I said sometimes his name gets lost in the shuffle, so I just wanted to give him a mention....

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Aug 21, 2010 2:40 AM

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> I think the reason I always loved Dewhurst is that she was so formidable..... and being looked over a lot of the time, I wanted to be just like her..... and that's pretty much as far away from my own character as possible. :D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I remember reading a Pauline Kael review of the movie she did with Duke, forget the name. Kael complains that Colleen's character is being treated poorly by Wayne, and that how could the script let this happen to a force of nature like Dewhurst?

>

> Marilla is wonderful - I love how cold she is, but then the fire and wamth underneath - I can't think of another actress who could play her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was a bit taken aback at Colleen Dewhurst playing this role, but boy she sure grew on me, a fantastic performance, and I agree completely with your assessment. By the way, I think Colleen was actually born in Canada, so maybe the role had a personal appeal for her.

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