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Western Movie Rambles


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Then, I'm sure there were some men who sang a sob story about why they chose to

do what they did. This, however, does not make them anymore innocent. Just because

you have been wronged, it doesn't give you a free pass at wronging others. So this

thinking is completely misguided and horribly flawed.

 

And then there are some men who will never view their actions as being wrong. They

only wish to harm others and they will concoct many, many reasons for why they choose

to do it. The most common reason (excuse) they will use is that it's someone's fault, not

their own. They are to always be viewed as the "victim." These kind of men are the

most dangerous of all, for they are blind to doing right and they will continue to hurt

others whenever they are given the chance to do so.

 

Anybody who'd kill a man for a lousy $50 gold piece is a l-o-s-e-r. Notice how that

one that shot his mouth off to John T only did so because there was a crowd of

them in that bar? What about the one on the street, the one John stood down.

He was alone so it was "Yes, sir!"

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Anybody who'd kill a man for a lousy $50 gold piece is a l-o-s-e-r.

 

Money talks.

 

Notice how that one that shot his mouth off to John T only did so because there

was a crowd of them in that bar? What about the one on the street, the one John

stood down. He was alone so it was "Yes, sir!"

 

That's a good point.

 

Are you gonna share your take on the neglected Stumpy with us?

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Are you gonna share your take on the neglected Stumpy with us?

 

ooooh! That's what you were referring to! I couldn't remember what I

said that you were hinting about, ha!

 

Yes, going back to how Hawks creates a sort of family out of these disparate

individuals, I think Stumpy is not only "mother hennish" but he even acts like

a neglected wife, complaining of doing the cooking, the cleaning and

"babysitting" Joe without getting a word of thanks for it. He sounds just

like a wife. That's when, as Kathy pointed out, John T responds by

calling him a "treasure" and kissing the top of his head. It's very funny.

I had screencaps but they turned out badly so I deleted them.

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ooooh! That's what you were referring to! I couldn't remember what I

said that you were hinting about, ha!

 

:D Blondes!

 

Yes, going back to how Hawks creates a sort of family out of these disparate

individuals, I think Stumpy is not only "mother hennish" but he even acts like

a neglected wife, complaining of doing the cooking, the cleaning and

"babysitting" Joe without getting a word of thanks for it. He sounds just

like a wife. That's when, as Kathy pointed out, John T responds by

calling him a "treasure" and kissing the top of his head. It's very funny.

 

And that's the feeling I got with ol' Stumpy. Your explanation is perfect, too. I love

your usage of "babysitting." Excellent! Stumpy is basically a stay-at-home "wife."

 

riobravo42.jpg

 

riobravo43.jpg

 

riobravo44.jpg

 

riobravo45.jpg

 

riobravo46.jpg

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Yay! That's the scene I wanted to capture. I think it's so funny. It's really

sweet. There's a lot of warmth in this movie. I used think Howard's movies

all seemed a bit unemotional, kind of like his reputation in general. But this

one is definitely toasty and human.

 

I think what Hawks may have found tough to express as a person, he was

able to on screen. Like humor, too. I keep reading how 'cold' he was in

real life yet his movies are just filled with humor. Not gags, mind you, but

a humorous outlook. So maybe everything was locked up inside and only

in the movies could he express it.

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Yay! That's the scene I wanted to capture. I think it's so funny. It's really

sweet. There's a lot of warmth in this movie. I used think Howard's movies

all seemed a bit unemotional, kind of like his reputation in general. But this

one is definitely toasty and human.

 

You told me before my viewing of Rio Bravo that you thought it was

Hawks' warmest film and it certainly is that. It really is a warm, inviting film.

John Wayne's performance is a big reason why, too. I really cannot say

enough about his "John T. Chance." He's confident but not overconfident.

He's strong but dominating. He's smart yet he still falls into traps. His

overall human touch is pitch perfect, as far as I'm concerned.

 

I think what Hawks may have found tough to express as a person, he was

able to on screen. Like humor, too. I keep reading how 'cold' he was in

real life yet his movies are just filled with humor. Not gags, mind you, but

a humorous outlook. So maybe everything was locked up inside and only

in the movies could he express it.

 

What I know of Hawks, I know from reading your words and others. You are

very right about his films possessing wonderful humor. It's my kind of humor,

too: smart alecky. And I certainly like his take on the "battle of the sexes."

 

riobravo47.jpg

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You told me before my viewing of Rio Bravo that you thought it was

Hawks' warmest film and it certainly is that. It really is a warm, inviting film.

John Wayne's performance is a big reason why, too.

 

That is true. Wayne is very relaxed and a "comforting" presence here.

 

And I certainly like his take on the "battle of the sexes."

 

Now why did you post that screencap? "Feathers" certainly

didn't put him down there on the ground.

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That is true. Wayne is very relaxed and a "comforting" presence here.

 

More than any of his characters that I have seen. He's very much at ease.

 

Now why did you post that screencap? "Feathers" certainly

didn't put him down there on the ground.

 

She didn't? I could have sworn she floored him.

 

I posted that cap because it was an example of John T. falling victim to a trap. You

know, like Feathers' trap. :P

 

T-R-A-P!

 

riobravo48.jpg

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> {quote:title=calypsogal wrote:}{quote}

> riobravo47.jpg

>

> Well, _that's_ the spirit! ;)

 

Well, calypsogirl, what do you expect? He's the duke. No, actually, make that the _Duke_. He's a fighter. He gets up and keeps on goin'. And especially in a movie like "Rio Bravo", because it's, like, one of Hawks' warmest movies ever! ;)

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Shiftless,

 

Hawks liked working with Wayne because the amount of violence Wayne could bring to a role. Also he had a great deal of respect for Wayne's acting. Given Wayne's size, he was always careful not to cast someone of equal physical size in the supporting role.

 

He really liked the concept of "Mutt and Jeff" types for the lead and the supporting role.

 

Hawks and Wayne had a very different relationship than Ford and Wayne. Hawks and Wayne were more friends and Wayne and Ford had a more complicated father/son relationship.

 

I think the fact that Hawks and Wayne became friends is evident in the films they made together after *Red River* . I imagine the on-location work (as well as the off-set camaraderie) was more relaxed for Wayne (but not Dobie Carey) than working with Pappy.

 

Hawks may have helped Ford realize what depth Wayne could bring to role (though Ford must have had some inkling having used Wayne in *They Were Expendable* but it was Ford who got not only the best non-Wayne performance out of Wayne but knew that he could deliver the goods when he cast Wayne as Ethan Edwards in *The Searchers*.

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Calypsogal,

 

If you are interested in John Wayne you might enjoy:

 

Duke: We're Glad We Knew You: John Wayne's Friends and Colleagues Remember His Remarkable Life by Herb Fagen

 

It's available from Amazon along with a number of other books about Wayne.

 

I've found books like this one and Scott Eyman's wonderful bio of John Ford as well as Hawks on Hawks come in handy when discussing in-depth about films.

 

Message was edited by: lzcutter because the indentation bug needs to be fixed

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Howdy, Kool Aid Kid! -- Shiftless,

 

:D I haven't given Fordy Guns her credit yet, but I love that nickname. It matches me

perfectly.

 

Hawks liked working with Wayne because the amount of violence Wayne could

bring to a role.

 

Wow! That's very interesting.

 

Also he had a great deal of respect for Wayne's acting.

 

I have been pleasantly surprised by Wayne's acting ability. He's a very emotional

actor.

 

Given Wayne's size, he was always careful not to cast someone of equal physical

size in the supporting role.

 

Wayne is certainly an imposing figure. I prefer the younger Wayne, right now.

 

Hawks and Wayne had a very different relationship than Ford and Wayne. Hawks

and Wayne were more friends and Wayne and Ford had a more complicated

father/son relationship.

 

I have heard of how tough Ford could be on Wayne. He liked to push him, test him. That

kind of treatment would wear me down after a while.

 

Hawks may have helped Ford realize what depth Wayne could bring to role (though

Ford must have had some inkling having used Wayne in They Were Expendable but

it was Ford who got not only the best non-Wayne performance out of Wayne but knew

that he could deliver the goods when he cast Wayne as Ethan Edwards in The Searchers.

 

"Tom Dunson" (Red River) was the first Wayne performance I ever saw and I really liked it.

I liked seeing Wayne playing the "bad guy." Then I saw The Searchers and I was even

more impressed with the complexity of Wayne's character and performance. I then saw

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. I think there is more "Wayne" in that film, but

I loved his sacrificing for his true love. Rio Grande and The Wings of Eagles

are the other Wayne performance I have seen that I felt were excellent. And now his

"John T. Chance" has become my very favorite of his characters.

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*I have heard of how tough Ford could be on Wayne. He liked to push him, test him. That*

*kind of treatment would wear me down after a while.*

 

Ford was tough on everyone it seems. He would dog you until you earned his respect (usually by standing up to him) but he and Wayne had a very complicated relationship that often carried over to Ford all but humiliating Wayne on and off the set.

 

Hawks wanted respect from his actors and made it clear that he was the boss and the last word. Witness his treatment of Dobie Carey who was cast in *Rio Bravo*. Dobie got careless and called him Howard instead of Mr. Hawks in front the cast and crew.

 

Dobie ended up not being in the film (though he was paid for his time anyways).

 

And Hawks truncated John Ireland's role as Cherry Valance in *Red River* because they both wanted to make time with Joanne Dru.

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