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Film_Fatale

The films of the amazing Howard Hawks

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> {quote:title=Catwoman915 wrote:}{quote}

> I can't think of a Howard Hawks film that I don't like. He was one of the best.

 

I can't think of one I didn't like, either, but I can think of maybe one or two that I haven't had a chance to watch yet. But, having watched the "Men Who Made the Movies" special about him made me appreciate him even more!

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As part of the "Great Directors" theme this month, TCM will dedicate all of Sunday's schedule to Howard Hawks.

 

*SCHEDULE FOR SUNDAY, JUNE 14*

 

*A Song Is Born* (1948) 6am ET

A group of music professors takes in a singer on the run from her gangster boyfriend.

Cast: Danny Kaye, Virginia Mayo, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey Dir: Howard Hawks C-113 mins, TV-G

 

*Tiger Shark* (1932) 8am ET

A tuna fisherman marries a woman in love with another man.

Cast: Edward G. Robinson, Richard Arlen, Zita Johann, Leila Bennett Dir: Howard Hawks BW-77 mins, TV-PG

 

*Sergeant York* (1941) 9:30am ET

True story of the farm boy who made the transition from religious pacifist to World War I hero.

Cast: Gary Cooper, Walter Brennan, Joan Leslie, George Tobias Dir: Howard Hawks BW-134 mins, TV-G

 

*Bringing Up Baby* (1938) 12pm ET

A madcap heiress upsets the staid existence of a straitlaced scientist.

Cast: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Charlie Ruggles, Walter Catlett Dir: Howard Hawks BW-102 mins, TV-G

 

*Twentieth Century* (1934) 2pm ET

A tempestuous theatrical director tries to win back the star he created and then drove away.

Cast: John Barrymore, Carole Lombard, Walter Connolly, Roscoe Karns Dir: Howard Hawks BW-91 mins, TV-PG

 

*His Girl Friday* (1940) 4pm ET

An unscrupulous editor plots to keep his star reporter-and ex-wife-from re-marrying.

Cast: Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy, Gene Lockhart Dir: Howard Hawks BW-92 mins, TV-G

 

*Ball Of Fire* (1941) 6pm ET

A group of professors takes in a nightclub singer hiding from the law to protect her gangster boyfriend.

Cast: Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck, Oscar Homolka, Henry Travers Dir: Howard Hawks BW-112 mins, TV-G

 

*To Have And Have Not* (1944) 8pm ET

A skipper-for-hire's romance with a beautiful drifter is complicated by his growing involvement with the French resistance.

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Walter Brennan, Lauren Bacall, Dolores Moran Dir: Howard Hawks BW-100 mins, TV-G

 

*The Big Sleep* (1946) 10am ET

Private eye Philip Marlowe investigates a society girl's involvement in the murder of a pornographer.

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, John Ridgely, Martha Vickers Dir: Howard Hawks BW-116 mins, TV-PG

 

*Only Angels Have Wings* (1939) 12am ET

A team of flyers risks their lives to deliver the mail in a mountainous South American country.

Cast: Cary Grant, Jean Arthur, Richard Barthelmess, Rita Hayworth Dir: Howard Hawks BW-121 mins, TV-PG

 

*Air Force* (1943) 2:15am ET

A bomber crew sees World War II action over the Pacific.

Cast: John Ridgely, Gig Young, Arthur Kennedy, Charles Drake Dir: Howard Hawks BW-125 mins, TV-G

 

*The Crowd Roars* (1932) 4:30am ET

A race-car driver tries to keep his brother from following in his footsteps.

Cast: James Cagney, Joan Blondell, Ann Dvorak, Eric Linden Dir: Howard Hawks BW-70 mins, TV-G

 

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Thoughts about a couple of Hawks films I hadn't seen before:

 

TWENTIETH CENTURY: Has some funny things, but in comparison with HIS GIRL FRIDAY/BRINGING UP BABY/BALL OF FIRE, Hawks hasn't yet worked out the editing rhythms that unify the film. It's not just the overlapping dialogue in the later films, it's the momentum that pushes the film from scene to scene. Still, there's a lot to enjoy in TWENTIETH CENTURY, from Barrymore's hamming to Carole Lombard's beauty to the little man with the "Repent" stickers.

 

ONLY ANGELS HAVE WINGS: Now I understand why people have written about the gay subtext of this film. Jeff (Cary Grant) is interested in women, but not necessarily long enough to remember their names, as we learn. He seems more emotionally involved in seeing if McPherson (Richard Barthelmess) can fit into the group of men at the airfield than he does in seeing his ex-girlfriend (Rita Hayworth) again. Ordinarily, we would expect the ex to be the main challenge for Bonnie (Jean Arthur), but that's not really the case. The emotional logic of the film seems to be that Jeff can only accept Bonnie after his friend the Kid (Thomas Mitchell) dies. There's a fascinating shot about a third of the way through the movie where Jean Arthur, back to the camera, is at the right while Grant, separated by furniture, is at the left of the screen with Mitchell behind him. Bonnie wants closeness with Jeff; the composition suggests that Jeff and the Kid together are resisting her. Bonnie later says to the Kid, "You love him, don't you?" Of course this can be read as meaning brotherly love or more than that. The Kid admits that he loves Jeff. The death of the Kid releases enough emotion in Jeff for him to ask Bonnie (indirectly) to stay. Oddly, Bonnie says that Jeff is crying but I saw no tears on Cary Grant's face. Romantic films often end with a shot of the two lovers together. Instead, Bonnie realizes from the coin Jeff wanted her to flip (heads on both sides) that he wants her to stay. We see her alone, radiantly happy. Jeff has already left her side to work with the other men. Ending with a shot of her alone perhaps gives us a more realistic view of the relationship than a standard clinch would. A very odd film.

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"Only Angels....." may be my LEAST favorite Hawks film, notwithstanding the fact that this is where Grant's "Judy, Judy, Judy" allegedly originated (although he never actually uuttered 3 Judys in a row.)

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That's correct, finance, he never actually said "Judy, Judy, Judy", but I have to admit that hearing anyone saying the name 3 times while imitating Grant's accent immediately makes me think of the movie.

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You don?t think that the difficult job and rough working conditions, and the constant threat of sudden death, and the fact that dames and dangerous jobs don?t usually mix, had something to do with the relationships in the story?

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*You don?t think that the difficult job and rough working conditions, and the constant threat of sudden death, and the fact that dames and dangerous jobs don?t usually mix, had something to do with the relationships in the story?*

 

Fred,

 

I agree with what you're saying and I think Hawks would as well. He was a flier as well as race car driver and a director. His younger brother, a fledgling director himself, had died in a flying accident while filming a flying stunt.

 

Hawks liked to explore the friendship between men and how throwing a dame or two into the pot tended to mix the whole thing up. It was one of his favorite themes and you can draw a line from his his version of *The Dawn Patrol* to *The Crowd Roars* to *Only Angels Have Wings* to *To Have and Have Not* to *Rio Bravo* and its subsequent remakes.

 

Hawks was quite the Lothario in his day and Ford had nicknamed him the Grey Fox in tribute to his many conquests with women. But he liked the friendship of his circle of buddies as well and knew that in a pinch they would be watching his back.

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It may have been done in the spirit of portraying nothing more than camaraderie between male friends, I suppose, but in the minds of some people even that will leave room for some other interpretation - even if it may be the furthest thing that Hawks had in mind while creating these "buddy buddy" relationships.

 

It doesn't necessarily detract from his accomplishments that different people can arrive at different readings about what has been portrayed, even if some of them may be way off the mark.

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I saw Hawks' TWENTIETH CENTURY this morning for the first time, and it was a real letdown. The reviews I read all agreed how great it was, but I found it to be singularly unamusing. Barrymore's and Lombard's scenery- chewing hamming it up were, to me, annoying. Anyone agree?

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It's funny. Just 24 hours later, I think of the film more favorably. Maybe I was just expecting too much, and my hopes were dashed.

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It's funny. Just 24 hours later, I think of the film more favorably. Maybe I was just expecting too much, and my hopes were dashed.

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I didn't get a chance to post this ahead of today's showing, but O. Henry's Full House was on the Fox Movie Channel earlier today. It is scheduled to show again on Nov. 19th. (Hawks directed one of the segments of the movie, "The Ransom of Red Chief".)

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Coming up next on TCM, one of Hawks' best:

 

*The Big Sleep* (1946)

Private eye Philip Marlowe investigates a society girl's involvement in the murder of a pornographer.

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, John Ridgely, Martha Vickers Dir: Howard Hawks BW-114 mins, TV-PG

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> I saw Hawks' TWENTIETH CENTURY this morning for the first time, and it was a real letdown. The reviews I read all agreed how great it was, but I found it to be singularly unamusing. Barrymore's and Lombard's scenery- chewing hamming it up were, to me, annoying. Anyone agree?

 

Yes.

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Coming up this evening, as part of the SOTM tribute for Humphrey Bogart, are two of Howard Hawks' best films from the 40s:

 

*To Have And Have Not* (1944) 8pm ET

A skipper-for-hire's romance with a beautiful drifter is complicated by his growing involvement with the French resistance.

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Walter Brennan, Lauren Bacall, Dolores Moran Dir: Howard Hawks BW-100 mins, TV-G

 

*The Big Sleep* (1946) 10pm ET

Private eye Philip Marlowe investigates a society girl's involvement in the murder of a pornographer.

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, John Ridgely, Martha Vickers Dir: Howard Hawks BW-114 mins, TV-PG

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The schedule for tonight includes Hawks' To Have and Have Not as one of the films that will be introduced by Guest Programmer Raquel Welch.

 

For those who will be up late tonight / early Friday morning, the 2:15am ET showing of To Have and Have Not will be followed by a special about Howard Hawks:

 

*The Men Who Made the Movies: Howard Hawks* (1973) 4:15am ET

Film clips and an exclusive interview capture the career of Hollywood's most efficient director of Westerns and screwball comedies.

Cast: Cary Grant, John Wayne, Howard Hawks Dir: Richard Schickel BW-55 mins, TV-PG

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Thanks for the info. Even on the west coast that is still rather late for me to be up watching TV!

 

Hawks is one of my top 5 directors. He created great movies in many different genre working with many different stars.

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