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Forbidden Hollywood Volume 3


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It would be nice if there were comedies like BLEESED EVENT (1932), PROFESSIONAL SWEETHEART (1933) and I'VE GOT YOUR NUMBER (1934),as part of a pre-code package, however, I'm glad that they are at least relaseing the Wellman pre-codes films instead of nothing.

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I have to say I am disappointed in the Vol 3 selections. I like Wellman, but I don't understand why they would omit the notorious Safe In Hell from a Wellman pre-code set? For me, that movie alone would have made the set a definite buy at any price. As it stands now, I'll probably just rent until there's a significant price drop.

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i didn't find *Other Men's Women* to be particularly worth watching. Cagney is prominently listed in the credits but he's just a background character at best, with only a few minutes of screen time. Joan Blondell is entertaining in her few scenes, but overall the movie is mostly a depressing melodrama centered around Grant Withers and Mary Astor. It is one of those movies where i wished they'd ditch the main storyline and just follow the supporting characters around, because they are sure a lot more interesting than the lead characters.

 

Joan does get to spout some very pre-code dialogue at the beginning of the movie; When some customers in the diner start hitting on her, she tells them she's "A.P.O.", as in "ain't puttin' out", which those guys don't seem to believe, implying that she has a reputation for being easy.

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If I recall correctly, Grant Withrs is a bit whiney in this film as well. Not one of my favorites, although I do like the railroad footage (vintage locomotives and such). I think I would rather of had SAFE IN HELL as part of the collection instead.

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If I recall correctly, Grant Withers is a bit whiney in this film as well. Not one of my favorites, although I do like the railroad footage (vintage locomotives and such).

 

yeah the railroad footage is good, and the background noise throughout the film never lets you forget you are near a railyard. i think Grant Withers was alright in some other early talkies, but i agree his character is annoying in this one.

 

I can't help comparing *Other Men's Women* to another Grant Withers / Cagney / Blondell movie, *Sinner's Holiday*. better movie IMO, if only because Cagney gets way more screen time, and is playing a gangster. also i think Evelyn Knapp is much nicer to look at than Mary Astor.

 

About *Safe in Hell*. i agree, great movie that should have been in this set.

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Well, I can't argue with most of the titles here. WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD, HEROES FOR SALE, MIDNIGHT MARY, and even FRISCO JENNY (I will watch Ruth Chatterton in anything) are all good choices

 

I like THE PURCHASE PRICE more for George Brent than Barbara Stanwyck; she's good, but not quite believable as a torch singer. Brent gives his most atypical performance here -- a decent guy with post-nasal drip, and he makes the most of it. Only George . . .

 

The ringer here is OTHER MEN'S WOMEN, but I can see why it was included in a William Wellman package: it's an early film for both Wellman (his second for Warner Brothers) and James Cagney (his fourth). Right before PUBLIC ENEMY sent both of their stocks soaring. It's also the first film in which Cagney dances -- a brief but nifty turn in a dance hall. And the railroad atmosphere in the picture is so authentic it hurts, with a slam-bang finale.

 

(Somebody at Warner Home Video really likes pre-code Cagney. Has anybody noticed that now all but two of Cagney's 1931 films and all but one of his 1933 films will now be available on DVD?)

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"(Somebody at Warner Home Video really likes pre-code Cagney. Has anybody noticed that now all but two of Cagney's 1931 films and all but one of his 1933 films will now be available on DVD?)"

 

Yes, sadly one of my favorite Cagney pre-codes, BLONDE CRAZY is one of the 1931 titles not released on dvd. The other, THE MILLIONAIRE, is a neat George Arliss film. THE MILLIONAIRE, along with THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD (1932), THE WORKING MAN (1933) and THE KING'S VACATION (1933), really warmed me up to the films of George Arliss.

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"(Somebody at Warner Home Video really likes pre-code Cagney. Has anybody noticed that now all but two of Cagney's 1931 films and all but one of his 1933 films will now be available on DVD?)"

 

This is what is left to be put on DVD of pre-code Cagney. They're pre-code in the sense of the era but not necessarily content. The films below the dotted lines are the ones not on DVD where Cagney is just in a supporting role. Above the dotted line, he's the star. There's definitely enough good stuff here to have a set of "Early Cagney".

 

He Was Her Man (1934)

Jimmy the Gent (1934)

Hard to Handle (1933)

Winner Take All (1932)

The Crowd Roars (1932)

Taxi! (1932)

Blonde Crazy (1931)

----------------------------------------------------------

The Millionaire (1931)

The Doorway to Hell (1930)

Sinners' Holiday (1930)

 

Of these ten films, only "Blonde Crazy" was on VHS. The rest have never been available in any format.

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I guess like others here, if you like Pre code, you have seen these movies already. I think everyone of them ran during William Wellman month earlier this year, well, last year. (go ahead tell me it was really 2007!) OTHER MEN'S WOMEN is an interesting movie in more ways than one, good beginning, bogged down middle, then Grant Whithers is less annoying, and ***Spoiler Alert*** Regis Toomey's final scene on the train, that look of relaxation as he is about to cross the bridge, almost makes up for the bulk of the film, IMHO.

 

Wish they would toss us a bone in one of these sets....

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I'd like to have seen *Safe in Hell* (what a movie) and maybe one of those early

Jimmys (Taxi! or Blonde Crazy) but it's still great to see any of these out on DVD.

And there's always volume four to be hoped for.

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> {quote:title=Scottman wrote:}{quote}

> Yes, sadly one of my favorite Cagney pre-codes, BLONDE CRAZY is one of the 1931 titles not released on dvd. The other, THE MILLIONAIRE, is a neat George Arliss film. THE MILLIONAIRE, along with THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD (1932), THE WORKING MAN (1933) and THE KING'S VACATION (1933), really warmed me up to the films of George Arliss.

 

I've only had the pleasure of seeing two of these, the Millionaire and The Working Man (and The Guv'nor, a British Arliss film TCM ran a couple of months back), and I am impressed with him as well. I doubt we'll ever see any DVDs come of it, though.

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> {quote:title=calvinnme wrote:}{quote}

> This is what is left to be put on DVD of pre-code Cagney. They're pre-code in the sense of the era but not necessarily content. The films below the dotted lines are the ones not on DVD where Cagney is just in a supporting role. Above the dotted line, he's the star. There's definitely enough good stuff here to have a set of "Early Cagney".

>

 

That would be such a great set to have... not sure they will think it has enough commercial potential, but it doesn't hurt to dream. ;)

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The absence of SAFE IN HELL on this set may be due to lack of pre-production materials. According to Richard P. May, former head of preservation at MGM and Turner Entertainment, the only source for SAFE IN HELL is a print in the Library of Congress that "had seen better days." TCM's broadcast print is a duplicate of that LoC print.

 

Knowing Warner Home Video's usual high standards of quality, we may have to wait for better materials to surface before we get SAFE IN HELL on DVD.

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> {quote:title=coffeedan wrote:}{quote}

> The absence of SAFE IN HELL on this set may be due to lack of pre-production materials. According to Richard P. May, former head of preservation at MGM and Turner Entertainment, the only source for SAFE IN HELL is a print in the Library of Congress that "had seen better days." TCM's broadcast print is a duplicate of that LoC print.

>

> Knowing Warner Home Video's usual high standards of quality, we may have to wait for better materials to surface before we get SAFE IN HELL on DVD.

 

If that's the best they can do, they should just include it as an extra, and say it's made from the best materials extant. It's certainly a good enough film to release no matter what condition - for broadcast, it was certainly acceptable. Fox released some of the Chans it had with the "best available materials" proviso, but of course you had to pay for them. If Dick May looked for it and couldn't find anything better, I doubt there's going to be anything more found (there's always a chance, however slim), but maybe somewhere one of the other libraries might have better material.

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