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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Re: the money:Could it have been against the law to depict United States currency in order to thwart counterfeiters???

>

 

Well, pretending to be a law enforcement officer is also against the law, but that doesn't stop movie producers from having police officers in their movies! ;)

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CineMaven wrote:

"Re the money:Could it have been against the law to depict United States currency in order to thwart counterfeiters???"

 

FilmFatale: "Well, pretending to be a law enforcement officer is also against the law, but that doesn't stop movie producers from having police officers in their movies!"

 

I believe there's a difference there becuz then ALL acting would be against the law. Should Fonda or Massey be arrested for portraying Lincoln? Or the actors who played the astronauts? Or should Greer Garson be arrested for having played Marie Curie?

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I found an interesting article regarding the portrayal of legal currency in the movies:

 

http://www.articlesnatch.com/Article/Fake-Money-Used-In-Movies-videos/287386

 

*Fake Money Used In Movies/videos*

By: Amy Nutt.

 

In Hollywood's infancy, filmmakers used real money in their productions, only to run into legal and administrative problems such as workers stealing the money. At the time, very strict laws prohibited the filmmakers from copying, photographing or imitating American currency in any way. This presented Hollywood with a tricky problem. Always resourceful, filmmakers found a way around it.

 

At the time, there happened to be large amounts of devalued currency printed by the Confederates during the American Civil War and Mexican Money printed during the Mexican Revolution. Both failed governments had issued a lot of money, hoping the volume would help stave off the money's declining values. Of course, they failed and the money was useless until Hollywood bought up caches of both types of cash, and the first Hollywood prop money was created.

 

Over time, the Confederate and Mexican folding money wore out, and most of it was thrown away or lost. By then, laws governing the reproduction of fake currency had loosened somewhat. Prop-making manufacturers began to print false money.

 

Much of this early fake money is now available via specialty Hollywood memorabilia stores. The makers of this money often copied Mexican and Confederate designs and used deliberate misspellings like "Steats of Amreica" to be sure the money could not be passed off as real. Many of these designs are interesting and very beautiful to look at. Though the designers were making obvious fake money, they took the time to make it look great.

 

In more recent history, laws loosened even more and the stacks of prop dollars being printed by manufacturers became even more convincing. There have been several incidents where the Secret Service (which oversees American currency and stings counterfeiters) has stepped in and confiscated Hollywood prop money, and forced companies to discontinue printing it.

 

In one notable case, bills with a total face value close to $1 Billion was blown up during the filming of "Rush Hour 2" in Las Vegas. A significant amount of the fake money, which happened to be very convincing, drifted into crowds of people in Las Vegas. Knowingly and unknowingly, people began to use the bills. Large amounts of this money began turning up in the Las Vegas and Los Angeles areas. Many bills were being passed successfully.

 

As the incident grew more widespread, the Secret Service got involved and the company that produced the bills, Indepenedent Studio Services, Inc., became embroiled in legal trouble. The Secret Service deemed their fake money product too realistic and seized the prop money from ISSI's facilities. Evenutally the company had to stop printing fake money altogether.

 

Today, prop money is still widely available via memorabilia stores, prop suppliers, private collectors and online auctions. But this prop money is almost always obviously fake, with indicators printed on the bills. Also, much of this printable fake money is smaller than its real counterpart.

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I have a number of prop "U.S. currency" bills from various periods in Hollywood history. Most of it's pretty uninteresting, but my favorite is the design used by Fox in the 1940s and '50s, that carries Fox's corporate name and logo.

 

I did find a real hundred-thousand-Reichsmark banknote from Germany's Weimar Republic (c. 1923) several years ago in the Warner's prop department. It's historically interesting in that the hyperinflation of this currency contributed to the fall of the Weimar regime and the rise of the Nazi Party in the late 1920s.

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"I believe there's a difference there becuz then ALL acting would be against the law. Should Fonda or Massey be arrested for portraying Lincoln? Or the actors who played the astronauts? Or should Greer Garson be arrested for having played Marie Curie?"

 

Well, I don't know about arrested, but someone should have at least slapped William Bendix for playing Babe Ruth. House arrest.......a fine.......I dunno......

SOMETHING........

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> {quote:title=CineSage_jr wrote:}{quote}

> I have a number of prop "U.S. currency" bills from various periods in Hollywood history. Most of it's pretty uninteresting, but my favorite is the design used by Fox in the 1940s and '50s, that carries Fox's corporate name and logo.

>

 

I don't suppose there's any way you could share a photo with us of that Fox bill?

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> But this (today's) prop money is almost always obviously fake, with indicators printed on the bills. Also, much of this printable fake money is smaller than its real counterpart.

 

I disagree with that. I once had a huge stack of movie money and it was like everything else in Hollywood - larger than life. The bills were about 10% larger and only printed on one side. Then they were glued on top of colored foam to create "stacks" light enough to carry.

 

Most of my "props" are food items from commercials and almost always bigger than the real thing, like my resin Ritz cracker.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}

> I disagree with that. I once had a huge stack of movie money and it was like everything else in Hollywood - larger than life. The bills were about 10% larger and only printed on one side. Then they were glued on top of colored foam to create "stacks" light enough to carry.

>

> Most of my "props" are food items from commercials and almost always bigger than the real thing, like my resin Ritz cracker.

 

That was one part of the story I wasn't so sure about. I've also read elsewhere that sometimes prop money can be as much as 20% bigger than real currency.

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Cinemaven wrote: "I believe there's a difference there becuz then ALL acting would be against the law. Should Fonda or Massey be arrested for portraying Lincoln? Or the actors who played the astronauts? Or should Greer Garson be arrested for having played Marie Curie?"

 

Mickeeteeze: "Well, I don't know about arrested, but someone should have at least slapped William Bendix for playing Babe Ruth. House arrest.......a fine.......I dunno......

SOMETHING........"

 

Now THERE'S a thread for you: "MOVIES THEY MADE THAT THEY SHOULD HAVE BEEN ARRESTED FOR!!"

 

Like, who told Kate Beckinsale she should play AVA GARDNER in "The Aviator"??? (And hell, I LOVE Kate Beckinsale).

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Like, who told Kate Beckinsale she should play AVA GARDNER in "The Aviator"??? (And hell, I LOVE Kate Beckinsale).

 

kate-avanew.jpg

It's not that I think it was the greatest choice - simply can't think of anyone who could have done any better.

 

What did you think of Gwen Stefani as Jean Harlow?

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> I would say actress Deborah Unger as a brunette.

 

Wow, you know what? That's actually not a bad choice! I've been secretly admiring Ms Unger for a long time now, at least since *The Game*, and I'm sad she hasn't found better parts lately. Certainly *88 Minutes* is not going to do anyone's career any good. :(

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> {quote:title=dianabat wrote:}{quote}

> Does anyone know why they use Roman Numerals to represent copyright dates in movies? I can't think of a single reason that makes sense.

>

> Di

 

Maybe to make us think the film is newer by not letting the average viewer figure it out in the .6 seconds its shown on the screen...

 

Message was edited by: casablancalover

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Film Fatale...yeah, maybe "88 Minutes" is not the ticket.

 

Mickeeteeze...you're right: EXTREMELY.

 

You know what's burned in my memory? "Whispers in the Dark." She yells at Annabella Sciorra in the office lobby. (To paraphrase): "My psychiatrist is f**king my boyfriend. I should have put a knife in you a long time ago!"

 

She's great!

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"You know what's burned in my memory? "Whispers in the Dark." She yells at Annabella Sciorra in the office lobby. (To paraphrase)............."

 

Totally. One of those rare actors/actresses that has that "something extra" that in no way, shape or form interferes with her ability to play "salt of the earth". For me, even her "not so goods" are completely watchable because, well, she's completely watchable.

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I'm with you on that score Mickeeteeze, extremely watchable. You know what I really think? Frankly, I think male directors are probably intimidated by her. Strength, sexually intimidating ('you better measure up boy'), not so pretty in the conventional sense. I'm working towards being a writer/director. I'd hire her. But then again, I'm a woman.

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"Strength, sexually intimidating ('you better measure up boy'), not so pretty in the conventional sense. I'm working towards being a writer/director. I'd hire her. But then again, I'm a woman."

 

First of all, good luck in your project(s?). You certainly seem to have the personality for it.

That's a compliment, and not a backhanded one either!

Second, I'd pay big dough to get put in my place by Ms. Unger. Doesn't seem like a bad way to go at all!

:D

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Was that Sheldon Leonard I saw in *"To Have And Have Not"* ? He was playing one of the bad guys who gets hand cuffed when Bogie shoots through the desk.

 

I could easily look it up, but I was wondering if you guys could tell me of hand....without me having to look it up...LOL!

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Yes, my fave guy Sheldon was a gangster in TH&HN.

 

My question: Why does music always get louder at the end of a movie? There must be a real reason they do this, as it's pretty universal.

It *can't* be to wake dozing audience as is always suggested, or it would be admitting their movie is a stinker. I hate waking to the music swelling to "The End". :-(

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}

> Yes, my fave guy Sheldon was a gangster in TH&HN.

 

Oh, thanks I had forgotten I had asked... :)

 

Have you ever seen him playing a gangster in *"Guys And Dolls"* ? It is HILARIOUS!

 

 

About the music. I always thought it had something to do with giving the film a big finish. Sometimes that is totally out-of-line with the rest of the movie, but I do think it was the studio's way of telling..."Yes, you were watching a movie. That was not real. That was all OUR doing. We are amazing." I know that sounds a little weird (to me too!), but that is what I always thought.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}

> Yes, my fave guy Sheldon was a gangster in TH&HN.

>

> My question: Why does music always get louder at the end of a movie? There must be a real reason they do this, as it's pretty universal.

> It *can't* be to wake dozing audience as is always suggested, or it would be admitting their movie is a stinker. I hate waking to the music swelling to "The End". :-(

 

 

TikiSoo-

 

I was told by some theater old timer's it was to wake the projectionist! Ha-ha!

No really, that same person said (seriously) it just helps out the ushers, so it did have a practical reason. Time to open the doors, for an orderly recession of audience. I buy that. Also, he said the projectionist would raise the volume sometimes before those movies with intermission breaks, as a forewarning to the concession stand.

It really would seem odd to me not to cresendo the movie with the music swelling. I think it does first and foremost serve that purpose.

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Tikisoo...I have also noticed that in older movies when the actors are in a scene, a nightclub for example,the music is playing, but when the actors start talking, the music is muted.

 

Unlike today's movies, when we sometimes have to strain to hear the dialogue, because the

sound is consistant. It is more realistic, just like lighting, in films today, which I suppose

that is what they are going for.

 

I think Sheldon Leonard is terrific. Who would have thought he would become a big time

producer in television. "The Dick Van Dyke Show", for instance

 

Message was edited by: Bargar

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